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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

BUS I ON PUBLICTjBRARY 



3 9999 06544 643 5 



i .i ■ i ii - i n . 



THE PUBLIC LIBRAR 



OF THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FORM NO 522: I 



— — ~— i 



rF 








Compliments of . . . 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



HENRY H. SPRAGUE, Chairman. 




HENRY P. WALCOTT. 




JAMES A. BAILEY, Jr. 




1 ASHBURTON 


Place, 




BOSTON. 


William N. Davenport, Secretary. 






r//j 



Public Document 



7 



No. 57 



NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



FOR THE YEAR 1909 




<0 



111 



BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1910. 






\0\0<\ 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



• • • ! \ 



CONTENTS. 



I. Organization and Administration, . 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes, 

(2) Offices and Buildings, 
II. Metropolitan Water District, . 

III. Metropolitan Water Works — Construction, 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir, 

(a) Dam and Reservoir, 

(6) Clinton Catholic Cemetery, . 

(2) Improvement of the Watersheds, . 

(3) Weston Aqueduct, .... 

(4) Distribution System, 

(a) New Supply Main for Boston Low-service District, 
(6) New Weston Aqueduct Supply Main, . 

(c) Northern High-service Main in Everett, Chelsea and Revere 

(d) New Main for the Supply of Winthrop, 

(e) Extra High-service Main to Belmont, . 
(/) New Pumping Engine at Chestnut Hill, 

(5) Acquisition of Lands and Settlements for Damages, 

(a) Acquisition of Lands, ..... 

(b) Depreciation of Real Estate, 

(c) Loss of Business, ...... 

(d) Diversion of Water, ..... 
IV. The Construction of the Metropolitan Water Works from 1895 to 1910, 

(1) The Taking of the Waters of the South Branch of the Nashua River 

(2) Wachusett Aqueduct, 

(3) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir, 

(4) The Clinton Sewerage System, 

(5) Taking and Completion of the Sudbury Dam and Reservoir, 

(6) Taking of Other Boston Works of Water Supply, 

(7) Taking and Improvement of Spot Pond, 

(8) Distribution System, 

(9) Weston Aqueduct, . ... 

(10) Protection of the Water Supply, 

(11) Cost of Various Works, . 

(12) Settlements for Real Estate and Other Damages, 
V. Water Works — Maintenance, . 

(1) Operation of Works, 

(2) Storage Reservoirs 

(3) Distributing Reservoirs, 

(4) Aqueducts 

(5) Pumping Stations, .... 

(6) Pipe Lines 

(7) Clinton Sewerage Works, 

(8) Protection of the Water Supply, 

(9) Sanitary Inspection, 

(10) Forestry, 

(11) Moth Suppression, .... 

(12) Quality of the Water, 

(13) The Rainfall and Water Supply, . 



iv CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

VI. Waterworks — Financial Statement, . . . 39 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loans, Receipts and Payments, 40 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Water Loan Bonds, .41 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 42 

(4) Annual Assessments and Receipts, 42 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to Water Companies, 43 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, .......... 44 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act, 48 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, .48 

(b) Receipts, 55 

(c) Assets 56 

(d) Liabilities, 57 

VII. Metropolitan Sewerage Works, . \ .... 57 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, 58 

(a) Deer Island Pumping Station Extension, ........ 58 

(&) East Boston Pumping Station Extension, ' . .59 

(c) Stable and Locker Buildings, 60 

(2) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, . . . . . .60 

(3) Acquisition of Land 61 

(4) North Metropolitan System — Maintenance, 61 

(a) Shirley Gut Siphon 63 

(6) Siphon under Alewife Brook, .......... 63 

(c) Changes caused by the Cambridge Subway, 63 

(d) Winchester and Woburn Sewers, .......... 64 

(5) South Metropolitan System — Maintenance, 64 

(a) High-level Sewer Extension 66 

(&) Outfalls of High-level Sewer, 66 

VIII. Sewerage Works — Financial Statement, .66 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments, 68 

(a) North Metropolitan System, ; . . 68 

(6) South Metropolitan System 69 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Bonds, 69 

(3) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 71 

(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, 72 

(5) Annual Assessments, ............. 73 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, . . .73 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement, ........... 76 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 76 

(6) Receipts, , 82 

(c) Assets 82 

(d) Liabilities, 83 

IX. Consumption of Water, 83 

X. Electrolysis, 86 

XL Recommendations for Legislation, 86 

XII. Future Work S9 



Report of the Chief Engineer of Water Works, 91 

General Statement, 91 

Organization, 92 

Construction, 93 

New 48-inch Supply Main for the Boston Low-service District, 93 

60-inch Supply Pipe Line 94 

24-inch Northern High-service Pipe Line in Everett, Revere and Chelsea, Section 33, 95 

16-inch Pipe Line for the Supply of Winthrop, Section 32, 96 

Northern Extra High-service Pipe Line to Belmont, Section 34, 96 

Pumping Engine for the Southern High Service, 97 

Miscellaneous, . . . 97 

Engineering, 97 



CONTENTS. v 

PAGE 

Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works — Concluded. 

Maintenance, . . 98 

Rainfall and Yield 98 

Storage Reservoirs, 98 

Wachusett Reservoir and Dam, . . . . ... . . . . 99 

Sudbury Reservoir, 102 

Framingham E,eservoir No. 3, . . . . . . . '. . . . . 104 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2, . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1, . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 

Ashland Reservoir, 104 

Hopkinton Reservoir 104 

Whitehall Reservoir, ............. 105 

Farm Pond, 105 

Lake Cochituate 105 

Sources from which Water for the Supply of the Metropolitan District has been taken, . 107 

Aqueducts, 108 

Wachusett, 108 

Sudbury, 108 

Cochituate, 109 

Weston, 109 

Pumping Stations, 109 

Chestnut Hill High Service Ill 

Chestnut Hill Low Service 113 

Spot Pond, 114 

Arlington, 114 

West Roxbury, 115 

Consumption of Water, . 117 

Metering of service pipes, ............ 120 

Quality of the Water 121 

Sanitary Inspection, 126 

Swamp Ditches and Brooks, ............. 131 

Protection of Supply, 131 

Forestry, ................. 134 

Distributing Reservoirs 138 

Weston Reservoir, 138 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, ............. 139 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 139 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe, 139 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs 139 

Mystic Reservoir, 139 

Mystic Lake and Pumping Station, 140 

Arlington Standpipe, . 140 

Pipe Yards 140 

Pipe Lines, 140 

Metering of Water to Municipalities, 142 

Pressure Regulators and Recording Gages, 143 

Electrolysis , 144 

Clinton Sewerage, 146 

Engineering, 150 

Cement Tests, 150 



Report of Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works, 152 

Organization, 152 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, . 153 

Areas and Populations . 153 

Metropolitan Sewers, 154 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, . 154 

Cost of Construction, 156 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage, 157 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works — Concluded. 

Construction, 

North Metropolitan System, .... 
Construction at Deer Island Station, 
Construction at East Boston Station, 

South Metropolitan System 

Extension of the High-level Sewer through West Roxbury, Brookline and Brighton, 
Maintenance, ........ 

Scope of Work and Force employed, 

Capacity and Results, 

North Metropolitan System, 

Deer Island Pumping Station, . 
East Boston Pumping Station, . 
Charlestown Pumping Station, . 
Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 
South Metropolitan System, 

Ward Street Pumping Station, . 
Quincy Pumping Station, . 
Nut Island Screen House, . 

Cost of Pumping, 

North Metropolitan System, .... 
Shirley Gut Siphon, . . . . . 
Siphon under Alewife Brook, . 
Pipes under Cambridge Subway, 
Tannery Drainage in Winchester and Woburn, 
New Pumps at Alewife Brook Station, . 
South Metropolitan System, .... 
South Metropolitan Outfalls, . . . 
Material Intercepted at the Screens, 



157 
157 
157 
158 
160 
160 
161 
161 
166 
166 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
170 
171 
171 
172 
175 
175 
176 
176 
177 
178 
178 
178 
178 



Appendix No 


. 1 


Appendix No 


. 2 


Appendix No 

Appendix No 

Table No. 


.3 

. 4 
1 


Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 


2 
3. 
4. 
5 
6 
7 


Table No. 


8 


Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 
Table No. 


9 

10 
11 
12 


Table No. 


13 


Table No. 


14 


Table No. 


15 


Table No. 


16 


Table'No. 


17 



Statement of Important Events in the Construction and Operation of the 

Metropolitan Water Works to January 1, 1910, 182 

Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending during 

the Year 1909 186 

Tests of Cements used on the Metropolitan Water Works, .... 191 

Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, . . 198 
Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water Works 

in 1909 198 

Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1909, ....... 199 

Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1909, ...... 200 

Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1909, ..... 201 

Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1909, . . . .203 

Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1909, . . . .204 

Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1897 to 1909 205 

Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 1875 

to 1909, 206 

Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1909, 209 
Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1909, 210 
Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1909, 211 
Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month 212 

Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for the 

Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, 213 

Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1909, by 

months 214 

Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill High-service 

Pumping Station for the Year 1909 215 

Statement of Operation of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1909, 216 

Statement of Operation of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1909, 217 



CONTENTS. vii 



Appendix No. 4. — Concluded. 

Table No. 18. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 5, 6, and 7, at Chestnut Hill Low-service 

Pumping Station for the Year 1909, 218 

Table No. 19. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 8 at Spot Pond Pumping Station for the 

Year 1909, 219 

Table No. 20. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station for the 

Year 1909, 220 

Table No. 21. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns sup- 
plied wholly or in Part by the Metropolitan Water Works, .... 221 
Table No. 22. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Low-service 

System, 221 

Table No. 23. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water from the High-service and 

Extra High-service Systems, . 222 

Table No. 24. — Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns supplied from 

Metropolitan Works, as measured by Venturi Meters in 1909, .... 223 
Table No. 25. — (Pump Basis) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, as 

Constituted in the Year 1909, and a Small Section of the Town of Saugus, 

from 1893 to 1909, 226 

Table No. 26. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, . 228 
Table No. 27. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . . 229 
Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . . 230 

Table No. 29. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, 231 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, . 232 
Table No. 31. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1909, 233 

Table No. 32. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1892 to 1909, 234 
Table No. 33. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 

Works, from 1898 to 1909, inclusive, 235 

Table No. 34. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of the 

Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1909, inclusive 237 

Table No. 35. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 1909, 238 
Table No. 36. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works 

in 1909, 239 

Table No. 37. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works 

in 1909, 240 

Table No. 38. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections owned 

and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and Number of 

Valves set in Same, Dec. 31, 1909 241 

Table No. 39. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, owned and oper- 
ated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Dec. 31, 1909, . . . 242 
Table No. 40. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 

Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 31, 1909, 243 
Table No. 41. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and 

Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, ..... 244 
Table No. 42. — Average Maximum and Minimum Monthly Heights, in Feet, above Boston 

City Base, to which Water rose, at Different Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1909, 245 

Appendix No. 5. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1909, 247 

Appendix No. 6. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the year 1909 250 

Appendix No. 7. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on January 12, 1910, . 255 
Appendix No. 8. — Legislation of the Year 1909 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board, 259 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Wachusett Dam — Inscriptions upon Granite Posts on Gateway at top of Dam, . . Frontispiece. 

Laying 60-inch Pipe in Commonwealth Avenue in Brighton, 7 

Wachusett Dam — Bronze Tablets on Gate and Power House, . II 

Wachusett Reservoir — Seven-year-old White Pines in Grass Land, 35 



viii CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Diagram showing Comparative Amounts of Water collected in the different years on the Sudbury 

and Wachusett Watersheds per square mile of Watershed, 38 

Sewerage Pumping Station and Extension at Deer Island, 58 

Ward Street Sewerage Pumping Station 65 

Diagram showing Average Rate of Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan District in 1909 during 

the Entire Day and Between the Hours of 1 and 4 at Night, ....... 84 

Making Wooden Insulating Joints on 48-inch Main in Brookline, 86 

Map showing Metropolitan Water District, Watersheds, Reservoirs, Aqueducts and Pipe Lines, . 90 

Laying Metropolitan 48-inch Main under Boston 48-inch Main in Brookline, ..... 93 

Chestnut Hill Pipe Yard — Loading 60-inch Pipe, 94 

Unloading 60-inch Pipe on Pipe Line in Brighton, 94 

Wachusett Dam — Gate and Power House, 101 

Diagram showing Average Rate of Consumption in Metropolitan Water District and Rainfall and 

Average Temperature of Air at Chestnut Hill Reservoir for Each Week during 1909, . . 120 

New Engine at Deer Island Sewerage Pumping Station, 158 

New Boilers at Deer Island Sewerage Pumping Station 158 

Map showing Metropolitan Sewerage District January 1, 1910, 272 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has al- 
ready presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account of 
its doings, receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and liabilities 
for the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1909, and now, in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 
1906, it presents a detailed statement of its doings for the calendar 
year ending on December 31, 1909, being its 

NINTH ANNUAL EEPOET 

made since the consolidation of the Metropolitan Water Board and the 
Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners on March 20, 1901. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes. 

The term of office of Henry H. Sprague expired on March 21, 
1909, and he was reappointed for the three years next succeeding. 
The membership of the Board has consequently remained as in the 
preceding year: Henry H. Sprague, chairman, Henry P. Walcott, 
M.D., and James A. Bailey, Jr. William N. Davenport has con- 
tinued as secretary and in charge of the auditing department. Al- 
fred F. Bridgman has been the purchasing agent and Miss Alice G. 
Mason the bookkeeper. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, two general clerks, three stenographers and 
clerks, a telephone operator, a messenger, and a janitor with two 
assistants, one of whom acts as watchman. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

George D. Bigelow has been in charge of the conveyancing work, 
and he has been assisted by Miss Alline E. Marcy, title examiner. 
They have performed such general conveyancing work and made such 
further investigation of real estate titles in the different counties as 
has been called for during the year for the general purposes of the 
Board and for the assistance of the Attorney-General in pending suits. 

The consulting engineers of the Board are Joseph P. Davis, Hiram 
F. Mills and Frederic P. Stearns, who are called upon for services 
when matters arise which require such consideration. 

Dexter Brackett has been Chief Engineer of the Water Works, with 
supervision of the various departments of both construction and main- 
tenance. William E. Foss, who until July 1 was, as Division En- 
gineer, in special charge of construction work and of electrolytic 
investigations in the Metropolitan District, has since that date, as 
Assistant to the Chief Engineer, had a general charge of engineering 
work in all departments. Others acting under direction of the Chief 
Engineer have been: Elliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent of the 
Wachusett Department ; Charles E. Haberstroh, Superintendent of 
the Sudbury and Cochituate Works and of the portion of the Weston 
Aqueduct above the Weston Reservoir ; Samuel E. Kill am, Superin- 
tendent in charge of the Weston Reservoir and the remaining portion 
of the Weston Aqueduct and of all reservoirs and pipe lines within 
the Metropolitan District; Arthur E. O'Neil, Superintendent of the 
several pumping stations ; Alfred O. Doane, Division Engineer in 
charge of engineering work at pumping stations; Benjamin F. Han- 
cox, Assistant in charge of the Drafting Department ; Arthur W. 
Walker, Biologist ; William W. Locke, in charge of the sanitary 
inspection of the watersheds ; and William E. Whittaker, Office 
Assistant. 

On account of the increased amount of construction work in prog- 
ress during the past year there has been an increase of about 20 per 
cent, in the engineering force employed. The average force in con- 
struction and maintenance during the year has included, in addition 
to the Chief Engineer, 4 department superintendents, 2 division en- 
gineers, 6 assistant engineers, and 35 others in various engineering 
capacities and as sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenographers and mes- 
sengers, the total force numbering 47. The maximum engineering 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

force employed at any one time during the year on both construction 
and maintenance was 54. 

A maintenance force in addition to those engaged in engineering 
capacities as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 249, has been required at the pumping stations, upon reser- 
voirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, and upon minor construction work. At 
the end of the year this force numbered 216. 

William M. Brown, as Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works, has 
continued in charge of both construction and maintenance. He has 
been assisted during the year by Frank I. Capen and Frederick D. 
Smith, Division Engineers, and Henry T. Stiff, Assistant Engineer, 
who have been in supervision of both construction and maintenance 
departments, by 1 assistant engineer all of the year and 3 assistant 
engineers during parts of the year, and by 22 others employed in 
various engineering capacities, and by 2 clerks and stenographers. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on construction and maintenance of Sewerage Works was 28. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the opera- 
tion of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers 
and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engineers 
and day-labor forces, has upon the average numbered 148. 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end of 
the year numbered 160, of whom the Chief Engineer and 17 assist- 
ants and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, and, of 
the remainder, 88 were employed upon the North System and 54 
upon the South System. 

Day-labor forces under the supervision of the engineers and the 
immediate direction of foremen have been employed in the construc- 
tion of foundations, new channels and connecting chambers in prep- 
aration for the extension of the buildings and plant at the Deer Island 
pumping station, and in construction of a siphon under the new chan- 
nel of Alewife Brook, on the Metropolitan branch sewer to Arlington. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction on the Sewerage Works during the year was 
for the week ending October 24, when the number amounted to 85. 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



(2) Offices and Buildings. 

The offices of the Board and of the secretary, the auditing and 
conveyancing departments, and the main engineering offices of both 
Water Works and Sewerage Works, are located in the buildings num- 
bered 1 and 3 Ashburton Place, at the corner of Somerset Street, in 
Boston. 

The office building belonging to the Board in Clinton and occupied 
as a branch office for the Wachusett Department of the Water Works 
has been given up, and the headquarters for this department have 
been removed to the gate-chamber and power-house at the Wachusett 
Dam. The branch office for the Sudbury Department is maintained 
at South Framingham. Headquarters of the maintenance force of 
the Water Works for the northern part of the Metropolitan District 
are maintained in the Glenwood pipe yard in Medford, where there 
are offices, shops, store-rooms and stables ; and the maintenance force 
for the southern part of the District has headquarters in like build- 
ings at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Branch headquarters of the maintenance and repair forces of the 
Sewerage Works are maintained for the North Metropolitan System 
near the East Boston and Deer Island pumping stations, and for the 
South Metropolitan System at the Ward Street pumping station and 
at the storage yard at Hough's Neck. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

Swampscott, although situated outside the 10-mile limit, was, under 
a special Act of the Legislature of the year 1908, admitted into the 
Metropolitan Water District on May 3, 1909. The sum of $90,000 
was paid by the town on account of its admission. By an Act of the 
year 1909 it was provided that all sums which should be received 
from the town for admission to the District should be paid into the 
Metropolitan Water Loan Fund, and might be applied by the Board 
to the construction of works made necessary by the admission of the 
town into the District. 

The District now comprises the cities of Boston, Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, Quincy and Somerville, and the 
towns of Arlington, Belmont, Hyde Park, Lexington, Milton, Nahant, 
Revere, Stoneham, Swampscott, Watertown and Winthrop, — in all, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

9 cities and 11 towns. The District has an area of 174.8 square 
miles, and its population, as of the date of July 1, 1909, the date upon 
which calculations for the Water Works are based, is estimated at 
1,022,260. 

The city of Newton and the town of Hyde Park, however, though 
belonging to the District, do not take water from the Metropolitan 
sources, but still depend upon their own sources of supply. 

III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The construction work upon the Metropolitan Water Works dur- 
ing the year 1909 has exceeded that of the previous year by more than 
50 per cent. The principal work accomplished has been in the Dis- 
tribution System, and has comprised the completion of the new main 
from the Chestnut Hill Reservoir to the Riverway in the city of 
Boston near the Longwood Avenue Bridge, the laying of mains for 
reinforcement of the water supply of Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop, 
Swampscott and Nahant, the laying of a main for the high service of 
the town of Belmont, and the provision for a new pumping engine 
for the southern high service. A beginning has also been made in 
the laying of a new main for bringing the supply from the Weston 
Aqueduct into the Metropolitan District. Some additions and im- 
provements have been effected in connection with the Wachusett Res- 
ervoir and watershed and with Lake Cochituate, but these have been 
made upon the maintenance account. 

The total amount expended for construction, including real estate 
and other property acquired, and payment of claims on account of 
the Water Works, during the calendar year 1909, was $359,667.13. 
Of this amount, $7,642.35 was expended on account of the Wachusett 
Dam and Reservoir; $4,135.50 for the improvement of the Wachu- 
sett watershed; $251 on account of the diversion of the waters of the 
South Branch of the Nashua River; $96,212.70 on account of the 
supply mains from the Weston Aqueduct; $242,304.50 for other 
construction in the Distribution Department; and the remainder, 
$9,121.08, for administration and other expenses. The total amount 
expended on account of construction since the beginning of the Water 
Works in the year 1895 has been $41,044,304.64. 



6 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir 

(a) Dam and Reservoir. 
The Wachusett Dam and Reservoir being regarded as completed 
works, some improvements and additions required have been made 
under the account of maintenance. The charges to construction have 
been mainly made in the settlement of old claims for depreciation of 
real estate and for injury to established business, and on account of 
the payment of a small amount of reserve held under former con- 
tracts. 

(&) Clinton Catholic Cemetery. 
Efforts which it was hoped would prove successful have been made 
during the year to bring about a final settlement under the agree- 
ment which was made in the year 1898 with the Roman Catholic 
Bishop of the Diocese of Springfield and the St. John's Catholic Cem- 
etery Association, by which the land acquired for the old cemetery 
in Clinton was taken and the bodies removed to the new site in Lan- 
caster purchased by the Board for the purpose of the Association. 
Final papers were again prepared for execution by the Bishop and 
the Association, but, owing to controversies still existing among the 
parties, they have not been executed and returned. As repeatedly 
stated in previous reports, the Board, having long ago performed on 
its part all the stipulations of the agreement so far provided for, has 
been ready and desirous, in accordance with its terms, to pay over 
to the Association the balance of the money, amounting to $32,096.83, 
becoming due from the Commonwealth, and to convey to the Associa- 
tion the lands in Lancaster occupied for burial purposes, to which 
the Commonwealth holds the legal title, on receipt from the Bishop of 
a conveyance of the old cemetery lot, now submerged in the reservoir, 
and the release from the parties of all claims for damages. 

(2) Improvement of the Watersheds. 

The appropriation available for the improvement of the Wachu- 
sett watershed was not sufficient to enter upon any large improve- 
ment on the construction account. 

The Board has deemed it wise to purchase five small parcels of 
land situated on and near Lake Waushacum in the town of Sterling 
which became attainable for the better protection of the waters of the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

lake, a feeder of the Waclrasett Reservoir. The premises were such 
that they peculiarly threatened the purity of the water. 

For like reasons it was deemed advisable to acquire a considerable 
tract of land in West Boylston through which a brook having a water 
privilege ran and emptied into the Wachusett Reservoir. 

Other improvements have been effected not only in the W T achusett 
watershed but also in the Cochituate and Sudbury watersheds, but 
as these pertained more especially to maintenance the cost of these 
improvements has been defrayed from maintenance funds. 

(3) Weston Aqueduct. 

Some claims under contracts arising on account of the construction 
of the Weston Aqueduct, the settlement of which has been long de- 
layed by reason of pending suits, have been finally settled. The pay- 
ments made under the settlements amounted to $1,627.35, making 
the total of expenditures for the construction of the Weston Aqueduct 
and Reservoir $2,849,490.11. 

(4) Distribution System. i 

(a) New Supply Main for Boston Low-service District. 
The laying of a new 48-inch main from a point near the Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir through Beacon Street and Longwood Avenue to the 
Riverway near the Longwood Avenue Bridge in the city of Boston 
was completed and the line was put in service on September 14. This 
main was deemed especially necessary for the reinforcement of the 
low service in that city. The length of the main is 12,400 feet, and 
the cost of the work has amounted to $162,698.06. There are two 
small bills still to be paid. Inasmuch as the appropriation authorized 
for the purpose was $190,000, there will be left a balance amounting 
to more than $25,000. 

(b) New Weston Aqueduct Supply Main. 

Under the authority given by the Legislature of the year 1909 for 
the construction of a 60-inch main from the terminus of the Weston 
Aqueduct to the present mains near Chestnut Hill Reservoir, con- 
tracts have been made for the furnishing of about one-half of the 
iron pipes which will be required. A contract was also made in the 
latter part of the season for the laying of about 8,000 feet of pipe 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

near the Chestnut Hill end of the line, principally through Chestnut 
Hill and Commonwealth avenues in Brighton. The estimate for the 
entire line was for an expenditure of $750,000. The value of the 
work done at the end of the year under the contract for laying 
the pipe was $25,902.53, and, in addition, pipes to the value of about 
$142,070 have been received. 

The work of laying the pipe will be prosecuted during the coming 
year, and it is expected that about one-half of the entire length, being 
the part on the Chestnut Hill end, will be completed during the two 
coming seasons. By laying this portion of the pipe the more pressing 
necessities of the District will be relieved, and it is possible that the 
laying of the remainder of the line may be put off for a period of a 
year or two, but such possibility is dependent upon the continuance 
of a saving in the consumption of water such as has been effected 
during the past year. This main is supplied, in addition to the 
48-inch pipe line which had previously been laid, for the purpose 
of bringing additional water from the Weston Aqueduct into the 
Metropolitan District, and is only one of several lines which will be 
required from time to time to supply the increasing necessities of 
the District. 

(c) Northern High-service Main in Everett, Chelsea and Revere. 

The laying of a new 24-inch main from the junction of Broadway 
and Hancock Street, in the city of Everett, through Chelsea to the 
junction of Fenno Street and Broadway in Revere, was begun and 
completed in the past year. This main has been laid to reinforce the 
present pipe line in order to give a sufficient pressure to the water sup- 
plied to Winthrop, Revere, Swampscott and Nahant. The laying of 
pipe was begun on July 20 and completed on December 17, and the 
whole line was put into service by the end of December. The esti- 
mated cost of the line was $68,000, for which, however, complete 
settlements have not yet been made. 

As the laying of this main was made immediately necessary on 
account of the admission of the town of Swampscott into the Metro- 
politan Water District, the expense of construction is paid out of the 
sum received from the town on its admission into the District. This, 
however, is but a portion of the new work which will be required on 
account of the admission of the town into the Metropolitan Water 
District, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 

(d) New Main for the Supply of Winthrop. 
A new 16-inch main, 3,945 feet in length, has been laid during the 
past year from a point near the Beachmont railroad station in Revere 
to the Winthrop town line, to take the place of a main belonging to 
the town of Revere which had been used for the supply of Winthrop. 
The laying of pipe was begun on August 4 and the new main was 
completed and put into operation on October 23. The estimate made 
of its cost was $14,500, but the total expenditures have amounted to 
but about $12,500. 

(e) Extra High-service Main to Belmont. 
A 12-inch pipe line from the standpipe on Arlington Heights to 
the Belmont town line has been required for the supply of buildings 
on the higher lands in Belmont. The pipe line laid has a length of 
1,610 feet and was constructed in the latter part of the year and put 
into service on November 18. The cost of the line has been $4,604.43. 

(/) New Pumping Engine at Chestnut Hill. 

The Board was authorized by the Legislature of last year to pro- 
vide additional pumping machinery for the Southern High Service 
at Chestnut Hill. Competitive bids were called for, and as a result 
the contract for the pumping engine was awarded to the Holly Man- 
ufacturing Company of Buffalo, N. Y. 

The new engine will have a daily capacity for pumping 40,000,000 
gallons, and the contract price is $98,769. This pumping engine will 
be located in the low-service pumping station, and its completion is 
called for in the early part of the year 1911. 

(5) Acquisition of Lands and Settlements for Damages. 
(a) Acquisition of Lands. 

During the past year the Board has acquired in fee, by purchase 
or taking, 25.585 acres of land. Six small parcels in Sterling, aggre- 
gating 1.245 acres, were purchased, at a cost of $2,440, for the pro- 
tection of the Wachusett watershed. A tract of 15.94 acres in West 
Boylston was also acquired for the same reason at a cost of $1,000. 
There were also acquired three parcels situated on the borders of Lake 
Cochituate in Natick, aggregating 2.86 acres, for the better protec- 
tion of the waters of the lake. For these the sum of $813 was paid 



10 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



out of the maintenance appropriation. A tract of 3.99 acres in Fram- 
ingham was also purchased out of the funds for maintenance, at an 
expense of $500, for the protection of Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
in the Sudbury Department. 

But a single taking was made, as follows : — 

Taking for Metropolitan Water Works for the Year 1909. 



No. 


Location and Description. 


1 
Former Owner. Recorded. 


Purpose of Taking. 


127 


Natick, — adjacent to lands of the 
Commonwealth on the margin 
of lake Cochituate, near We^t 
Central and Speene streets. 
Area, fee in 1.55 acres. 


Devisees of Willard 
Morse. 


1909. 

Nov. 24. 


Improvement of 
Cochituate water- 
shed. 



No settlements for lands acquired have been made aside from those 
effected upon the purchase of the lands above described. 

The settlements under purchases or takings of land for all pur- 
poses of the Water Works effected during the past year have been 11 
in number, and for an aggregate of 24.035 acres. The sums paid in 
all these settlements have amounted to $4,753, and in all the cases 
the settlements have been effected by voluntary agreements. 

(b) Depreciation of Real Estate. 
Settlements for depreciation in the value of real estate not taken 
by the Board were effected in 10 cases, 2 on account of lands situated 
in the town of West Boylston, amounting to $1,200, and 8 on account 
of lands situated in Boylston, amounting to $2,400, making a total 
for the year of $3,600. The 8 Boylston cases and 1 of the West 
Boylston cases were settled under awards made by commissioners ap- 
pointed by the court. The other West Boylston case was settled by 
agreement out of court. 

(c) Loss of Business. 

For injury to business caused by the carrying out of the Metropoli- 
tan Water Act in the towns of Boylston and West Boylston and in 
portions of the towns of Sterling and Clinton, settlements were made 
during the year in 3 cases, the amount paid being $650. 















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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

(d) Diversion of Water. 

There has been paid during the year 1909, on account of a judg- 
ment obtained for the diversion of water, the sum of $250. 

The sums enumerated as paid in the preceding cases do not include 
amounts paid for expert services and court expenses. 

IV. THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE METROPOLITAN WATER 
WORKS FROM 1895 TO 1910. 

The Metropolitan Water Act, chapter 488 of the Acts of the year 
1895, called for the construction of certain works within the first ten 
years following the passage of the Act, and certain other works within 
the succeeding ten years. The works contemplated for the first dec- 
ade have been completed, as well as the larger part of those which 
were proposed for the second decade, which is now half completed. 

The Act required the taking of the waters of the South Branch of 
the Nashua River; the building of the Wachusett Aqueduct; the 
building of the Wachusett Dam and Reservoir ; the taking and com- 
pletion of the Sudbury Dam and Reservoir; the taking of the other 
works of water supply of the city of Boston ; the taking and utiliza- 
tion of Spot Pond; and the extension of the Distribution System, 
including the laying of water mains throughout the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict, the making of distributing reservoirs and the enlargement and 
construction of pumping stations. 

The Metropolitan Water Act of 1895 not only included many re- 
quirements additional to the original scheme recommended by the 
State Board of Health in its report to the Legislature, but subsequent 
acts of the Legislature have extended the requirements to works and 
damages beyond the provisions of the original Act. 

(1) The Taking of the Waters of the Soutpi Branch of the 

Nashua River. 

The waters of the South Branch of the Nashua River were formally 
taken on February 23, 1898, and were directly afterwards diverted 
•and made available for the water supply of the Metropolitan Water 
District, the Wachusett Aqueduct and other works having then been 
sufficiently completed for that purpose. Settlement had previously 
been made with the larger part of the parties entitled to damages 
on account of the diversion of the waters. The sums paid on ac- 



12 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

count of water diverted, in cases where the damages were disconnected 
with other property or rights acquired or affected, have amounted to 
$1,212,995.42. This amount was paid to the various owners of man- 
ufacturing properties and water privileges along the Nashua River 
from the town of Clinton to the city of Nashua, and included a sum 
paid to that city for the damages which it suffered. 

(2) Wachusett Aqueduct. 
Preliminary work necessary for the building of the Wachusett 
Aqueduct was begun directly after the organization of the Metro- 
politan Water Board in the year 1895, so that the water of the river 
might at as early a date as possible be diverted at the point in the 
town of Clinton where the proposed dam was to be erected and be 
brought as a water supply to the Metropolitan District. The actual 
work of construction was begun early in the year 1896, and the aque- 
duct, having a length of 12 miles in tunnel, covered masonry and open 
channel, was completed and water was introduced on March 7, 1898. 
The total cost of the aqueduct was $1,797,948.85, of which the sum 
of $1,536,895.48 was expended in the work of construction, $94,- 
473.17 on account of real estate damages and expenses, and $166,- 
580.20 in preliminary and engineering charges and expenses. 

(3) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir. 
Borings, soundings and other investigations were begun for fixing 
the location of the dam to be built on the Nashua River at Clinton 
directly after the organization of the Board in the year 1895. This 
work was followed in the year 1897 by the building of the temporary 
or coffer-dam just above the site selected for the great dam, not only 
as a preliminary to the construction of the latter, but also to enable the 
diversion of the water of the river into the Wachusett Aqueduct. In 
the year 1899 excavations were made in the bed and at the sides of 
the river, but it was not until October 1, 1900, that the general con- 
tract for the building of the dam was made. Work under the contract 
was continued until the year 1906, at which time the dam was re- 
garded as completed, although the storage of water was begun as 
early as the year 1903, and other work has, since the year 1906, been 
carried on chargeable to the account of construction. The sum of 
$266,008.20 was expended for preliminary work and engineering; 
$120,173.53 was expended in the construction of the coffer-dam and 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 13 

other temporary works; $1,918,787.94 was spent on account of the 
main contracts for the building of the dam and the additional work 
thereunder; and $72,937.34 has been expended in the construction 
of the gate-house at the foot of the dam. The sums paid for the con- 
struction of the Wachusett Dam have thus amounted to $2,377,907.01. 

Surveys preliminary to the construction of the Wachusett Reser- 
voir were begun in the latter part of the year 1895. In the follow- 
ing year a beginning was made in clearing the territory of wood and 
brush and in the building of roads to take the place of those running 
through the area to be submerged. It was on July 26, 1897, that the 
first taking of lands was made, but considerable purchases of land for 
the reservoir had been previously effected. The first contract for 
stripping the reservoir and the removal of material was made on July 
14, 1897. The work of excavating and removal of the soil was sub- 
stantially completed in the year 1905, and the reservoir was for the 
first time filled to high-water mark on May 10, 1907. 

The work involved the stripping of the soil and other material 
from an area of 6.44 square miles and the removal of 6,926,000 cubic 
yards of material. The expenditures for this work amounted to 
$2,536,612.66, of which amount the sum of $2,134,093.87 was ex- 
pended under the contracts, $103,747.53 for additional work, and 
$298,771.26 for preliminary and engineering surveys. 

The surface of the territory flanking the masonry dam on each side 
was in places lower than the high-water level of the reservoir, and 
to retain the water, dikes or embankments of earth were built. The 
North Dike extends for a distance of about 2 miles northwesterly, 
and the South Dike extends about 2,925 feet southerly from the clam. 
The sums of $792,264.68 and $137,075.55 were respectively expended 
for their construction, in addition to the cost of the reservoir proper. 
These sums do not include the cost of excavating from the reservoir 
the material which was used in the construction of the dikes, but 
do include the cost of depositing the material at the dikes. 

Old roads running through the area within the limits of the reser- 
voir were discontinued to the extent of 19.25 miles, and new high- 
ways and necessary bridges were constructed to take their place, the 
main highways being built from Clinton to Boylston and West Boyl- 
ston both on the north and on the south sides of the reservoir. The 
length of all the highways constructed is 11.8 miles. Engineering 
and preliminary expenses amounted to $110,594.96, and "the total 



14 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

sum of $437,272.80 was expended under contracts and work addi- 
tional thereto. The total sum for construction of roads and bridges 
amounted to $547,867.76. 

The relocation of the Central Massachusetts Division of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad, which ran through the entire length of the bed 
of the reservoir, became necessary, and the railroad was diverted to 
the northerly side of the reservoir. For a portion of the distance a 
new roadbed was constructed by the Board, and for the remainder, 
under an arrangement made with the railroad company, the track of 
the Worcester, Nashua & Rochester Railroad was utilized. The rail- 
road construction involved the building of a tunnel about 1,080 feet 
in length, a steel viaduct over the river 921 feet long at a height of 
133 feet above the valley, and a deep rock cut. The length of the 
relocation is 8.87 miles, being about one-third of a mile longer than 
the old location, which was superseded. The engineering and pre- 
liminary expenses attending the works were $72,301.02. Contracts 
and additional work thereunder amounted to $631,974.04, and there 
was paid to the Boston & Maine Railroad for a release of all the land 
and structures taken and damages incurred, including the compensa- 
tion for the use of its tracks, the sum of $177,597.39. The total 
amount paid on account of the relocation was $881,872.45. 

The building of the reservoir involved the purchase and taking of 
7,945.58 acres, or 12.41 square miles, of land. Connected with 
these lands were 6 mills with water privileges attached, 4 churches, 
8 schoolhouses, 492 residences and other buildings, a large cemetery 
in which 3,902 bodies had been buried, and a small cemetery in 
which had been buried 65 bodies. Engineering, legal and expert ex- 
penses in connection with the acquisition of the real estate amounted 
to $216,386.64. The sum expended for mill property and water 
rights was $1,402,200 ; for other real estate, including property out- 
side of the direct margins of the reservoir, acquired for reservoir pur- 
poses, $1,439,914.88; and for sundry expenses, $148,263.61. The 
total expenditures for the acquisition of the real estate for the reser- 
voir were $3,206,765.13. 

The Metropolitan Water Act provided for the payment of indirect 
damages on account of injuries sustained by reason of the building 
of the reservoir. For depreciation in the value of real estate in the 
towns of Clinton, Boylston, West Boylston and Sterling which was 
not acquired there has been paid in 297 cases $289,588.24. On ac- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 15 

count of claims for loss of business in the same towns, caused by the 
carrying out of the Water Act, in 333 cases the sum of $156,699.18 
was paid. There was paid on account of loss of employment to resi- 
dents of West Boylston, to the number of 477, the sum of $85,959.65. 
Legal and expert expenses incurred independently of the acquisi- 
tion of real estate have amounted to $8,547.92. The total expendi- 
ture on account of indirect damages was $540,794.99. 

(4) The Clinton Seaverage System. 
In the year 1898 the Metropolitan Water Board was required by 
the Legislature to intercept and to purify the sewage of the town of 
Clinton. For the purpose it was necessary to build a sewerage pump- 
ing station and to construct filter-beds. These works were begun 
at once upon the passage of the Act, and were completed and put 
into use in the year 1899. There was expended on account of engi- 
neering and preliminary work the sum of $22,860.82, for acquisi- 
tion of real estate there was spent $37,794.40, for construction the 
sum of $88,908.19, and for sundry expenses $1,376.48, making a 
total expenditure of $150,939.89. 

(5) Taking and Completion of the Sudbury Dam and 

Reservoir. 

The Board was required by the Metropolitan Water Act forthwith 
to take and complete the Sudbury Dam and Reservoir, the construc- 
tion of which had been begun by the city of Boston, and to reimburse 
the city for the amount already spent for that purpose. The Board 
accordingly assumed the existing contracts for construction and pro- 
ceeded to the completion of the dam and reservoir. The dam was 
completed so that water could be stored in the reservoir in the month 
of March, 1898, and the whole work was brought to entire completion 
in December of the same year. 

Eor the construction of the Sudbury Dam, including preliminary 
work and engineering, there has been expended $648,792.45 ; and in 
like manner, for the construction of the reservoir, $1,623,673.91; for 
the purchase of land and margins, $621,367.43 ; and for legal, expert 
and general expenses, $29,299.92, making a total expenditure of 
$2,923,133.71. This amount includes the sum of $1,157,921.59 paid 
to the city of Boston in reimbursement for the expenditures pre- 



16 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

viously made in the construction of the dam and reservoir. There 
were, besides, necessary additions to the pipe lines and siphon below 
the dam in connection with the Sudbury Aqueduct, amounting to 
$71,614.46. 

(6) Taking of Other Boston Works of Water Supply. 

On or before January 1, 1898, the Board was required to take, in 
addition to the uncompleted Sudbury Dam and Reservoir, all the 
other lands and works held by the city of Boston, for the purpose of 
supplying water and for storing and protecting the purity of the 
water, situated westerly of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, together with 
the Chestnut Hill Reservoir and pumping station and other portions 
of the distributing system. The works taken included the small 
reservoirs in the Sudbury System, Lake Cochituate, the Mystic Water 
Works and also the Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts. All this 
property was, therefore, taken at that date, and afterwards operated 
by the Board for the water supjxly of the Metropolitan Water District. 

Settlement for the taking was effected with the city of Boston in 
the year 1900, and final payment on account of the amount due was 
made on October 29, 1901. The total amount paid to the city of Bos- 
ton in addition to the sum paid on account of the Sudbury Reservoir 
was $12,768,948.80. 

(7) Taking and Improvement of Spot Pond. 

The Board was also required to take, for the purposes of the water 
supply of the District, Spot Pond, situated principally in the town 
of Stoneham, and which was owned by the cities of Maiden, Medford 
and Melrose, together with the lands and other property held by the 
said cities, for the purposes of water supply or protecting and pre- 
serving the purity of the water. The taking was accordingly made 
on January 1, 1898. After considerable controversy settlements 
were effected with the cities of Maiden, Medford and Melrose by 
which they were paid, on account of the taking of the pond and 
property connected therewith, the sum of $1,240,229.62. 

In order properly to purify the water for the purposes of the Dis- 
trict it was deemed necessary to remove the mud and other organic 
material from the bottom of the pond and to enlarge its storage capac- 
ity, by which an increase in its capacity from 750,000,000 gallons to 
about 1,800,000,000 gallons was made. This improvement was ef- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 17 

fected at a cost of $582,188.73, but this cost is included under the 
expenditures for the Distribution System. 

(8) Distribution" System. 

The distribution of water to the various cities and towns of the 
Metropolitan District has necessitated the laying not only of large 
mains from the Chestnut Hill pumping station and from the ter- 
minus of the Weston Aqueduct, but various smaller mains in order 
to comply with the requirements of the Metropolitan Water Act that 
the Board should furnish water to each city and town by delivering 
the same into a main water pipe, reservoir or tank at sufficient pres- 
sure for use without pumping. The pipes laid vary in size from 
60 inches to 6 inches, and in length amount to 92.53 miles, those of 
36 inches and over measuring 48.09 miles in length. 

The distribution of water has required in addition the erection 
of a new low-service pumping station and the enlargement of the old 
high-service station at Chestnut Hill, the erection of the Spot Pond 
pumping station, the building of a new pumping station at Arlington, 
the improvement of Spot Pond, the construction of the Fells Reser- 
voir and Bear Hill Reservoir in connection with the improvement of 
Spot Pond, the construction of a distributing reservoir and stand- 
pipe at Forbes Hill in Quincy, and the acquisition of the Waban Hill 
Reservoir in Newton and Arlington standpipe on Arlington Heights. 

The expenditures for the various purposes have amounted to 
$6,100,012.96. 

(9) Weston Aqueduct. s 

In the year 1900 the consumption of water in the Metropolitan 
District had so increased as to test the capacity of the Sudbury and 
Cochituate aqueducts for supplying the necessities of the District, 
and consequently the authority of the Legislature was obtained for 
the construction of an additional aqueduct from the Sudbury Reser- 
voir to a point in Weston overlooking the Charles River. The con- 
struction of the aqueduct, with a capacity of carrying 300,000,000 
gallons per day, including an equalizing reservoir in Weston, was 
begun in the same year, and the aqueduct was completed and put 
into operation in the year 1903. 

The engineering and preliminary expenses attending the con- 
struction of the aqueduct amounted to $243,011.67. Contract and ad- 
ditional work amounted to $2,110,808.44. For the reservoir the 



18 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

engineering and preliminary expenses were $34,697.54 and the con- 
tract and additional work of construction amounted to $254,304.28. 
There was paid on account of real estate acquired the sum of $186,- 
400.55, and legal, expert and other expenses amounted to $20,267.63. 
The total cost, therefore, of the Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir 
was $2,849,490.11. 

(10) Protection of the Water Supply. 
Work has been carried on from time to time for the protection 
and improvement of the water supplies of the Sudbury and Cochituate 
systems and also for the improvement of the two watersheds. The 
larger sums were expended in the drainage of swamps and other im- 
provements in the Wachusett and Sudbury watersheds, for the pro- 
tection of the Sudbury Reservoir and Lake Cochituate, and for the 
improvement of Lake Cochituate under the requirements of a statute 
passed in the year 1901. The expenditures have amounted to $575,- 
396.74. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



(11) Cost of Various Works. 
The expenditures for construction during the period from 1895 
to 1910, on account of the various works have been as follows : — ■ 



Taking of waters of Nashua River, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, .... 
Wachusett Dam and Reservoir : — 

Dam (including $193 for Power Plant), 

Reservoir, ...... 

North Dike, 

South Dike, ...... 

Roads and bridges, 

Relocation of railroad, 

Real estate, ...... 

Indirect damages, .... 

Clinton Sewerage System, 
Sudbury Dam and Reservoir : — 

Dam and Reservoir, 

Pipe line and siphon, .... 

Taking of Boston works of water supply, 
Taking of Spot Pond, .... 
Distribution System, .... 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Protection of water supply, 



Total expenditures for the various works, 
General expenditures applicable to all the 
works, ........ 

Expenditures for engineering, conveyancing 
and legal expenses in common for acquisi- 
tion of works of Boston, Maiden, Medford, 
Melrose and Newton, 



Less stock acquired with Boston Water 
Works and charged to and included in Dis- 
tribution account, 



$2,378,100 01 
2,536,612 66 
792,264 68 
137,075 55 
547,867 76 
881,872 45 
3,206,765 13 
540,794 99 



$2,923,133 71 
71,614 46 



$281,453 29 



73,128 47 
$354,581 76 



22,340 91 



$1,212,995 42 
1,797,948 85 



11,021,353 23 
150,939 89 



2,994,748 17 
12,768,948 80 
1,240,229 62 
6,100,012 96 
2,849,490 11 
575,396 74 

$40,712,063 79 



332,240 85 



Total of all expenditures, 1895-1910, 



. $41,044,304 64 



20 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(12) Settlements for Real Estate and Other Damages. 

The total area of the lands acquired for the purposes of the Water 
Works since the beginning of operations in the year 1895, including 
lands in which easements have been acquired, has amounted to 16,- 
970.002 acres, or 26.515 square miles. For these the settlements 
effected have been 895 in number, of which 843, being more than 94 
per cent, of the whole number, have been made by voluntary agree- 
ments ; and only 52 cases, or less than 6 per cent, of the whole, were 
settled upon judgments obtained in court. 

Settlements have been effected with all owners of lands acquired 
for the Metropolitan Water Works who have made claims for dam- 
ages within the time allowed by the statute, except in 4 cases in- 
volving about 2% acres. 

The total area of lands acquired, however, includes the lands taken 
from the city of Boston with its water works for which settlement 
was made by agreement out of court, the lands originally acquired 
by the city of Boston for the construction of the Sudbury Reservoir 
for which reimbursement was made by the Board, the lands taken 
from the cities of Maiden, Medford and Melrose in connection with 
Spot Pond for which settlement was made on the basis of an award 
by commissioners appointed by the court, and the Waban Reservoir 
lands acquired from the city of Newton under a voluntary agreement. 

For all the remaining lands acquired by the Board the sum of 
$3,561,758.47 has been paid. In the settlements effected, 840 in 
number, 95.2 per cent, of the whole amount was paid under voluntary 
agreements, and 4.8 per cent, under judgments of the court. The 
legal, expert, court and miscellaneous expenses have amounted to 
$60,449.47, being 1.7 per cent, of the total amount of damages paid. 

In the settlement of the damages arising from the diversion of the 
waters of the Nashua River, the damages paid amounted to $1,138,- 
319.67, and of these, 80.6 per cent, were paid under voluntary set- 
tlements and 19.4 per cent, upon judgments obtained in court. The 
legal, expert, court and miscellaneous expenses amounted to $45,- 
179.74, being 4 per cent, of the total amount of damages paid. 

In the payment of the indirect damages for depreciation of real 
estate, damages to established business, and for loss of employment, 
there were 1,107 claims, on which the total paid was $532,247.07. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 21 

Of these, 92.5 per cent, in number and 78 per cent, in amount were 
settled by voluntary agreement. The legal, expert, court and mis- 
cellaneous expenses amounted to $19,507.63, being 3.6 per cent, of 
the total damages paid. 

For the settlement of the damages for the taking of the existing 
water works and in reimbursement to the cities of Boston, Maiden, 
Medford, Melrose and Newton there was paid the sum of $15,227,- 
100.01. The legal, expert, court and miscellaneous expenses of the 
Board amounted to $46,648.0*3, or % of 1 per cent, of the total sum 
paid in damages. 

At the earlier period of construction special attorneys were paid 
by the Board, but in the later years, beginning with November 1, 
1896, suits in court have been conducted by the Attorney-General 
and his assistants. 

V. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 
(1) Operation of Works. 
The maintenance and operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
extend to three large water pumping stations, two at Chestnut Hill 
and one at Spot Pond, two smaller pumping stations at Arlington 
and West Roxbury, two sewerage pumping stations, one upon Pegan 
Brook at Natick and the other at Clinton, ten storage reservoirs in 
the Cochituate, Sudbury and Wachusett watersheds, ten distributing 
reservoirs and standpipes at different locations within the Metropoli- 
tan District, the Cochituate, Sudbury and Wachusett aqueducts, the 
Clinton, Marlborough and Sterling filter-beds, 92.53 miles of main- 
pipes for the distribution of water to the various cities and towns in 
the Metropolitan Water District, and, in addition, the various pipe 
yards, gate-houses, siphon and terminal chambers and other struc- 
tures, dwelling houses for attendants and various other buildings 
used or held for operating purposes. Though the Mystic Reservoir 
is kept in service the Mystic pumping station and Mystic Aqueduct 
have not for some years been put into active operation. 

(2) Storage Reservoirs. 
The reservoirs maintained for the collection and storage of water 
in the various watersheds, with their holding capacities, are as fol- 
lows : — 



22 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Capacity in gallons. 

Cochituate watershed : — 

Lake Cochituate, including Dudley Pond, .... 2,242,400,000 

Sudbury watershed : — 

Sudbury Reservoir, 7,253,500,000 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1, . . . . . . 287,500,000 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2, 529,900,000 

Framingham Reservoir No 3, 1,180,000,000 

Ashland Reservoir, 1,416,400,000 

Hopkinton Reservoir, . . . ... . . . 1,520,900,000 

Whitehall Reservoir, 1,256,900,000 

Farm Pond, . . . . . . . . . . 167,500,000 

Wachusett watershed : — 

Waehusett Reservoir, . . 64,968,000,000 

Total, 80,823,000,000 

Although the normal capacity of these reservoirs is 80,823,000,000 
gallons, this total is in some years actually exceeded. The year 1909 
began with a storage of 58,890,300,000 gallons, and this amount was 
gradually reduced until February 9, when the quantity in storage 
was 57,300,000,000 gallons. For the succeeding three months the 
greater rainfall caused a gradual increase in the quantity in storage 
until the maximum of 79,112,800,000 gallons was reached on June 
14. The small amount of rainfall during the latter part of the year 
caused a gradual loss of storage, and on December 31 the total amount 
was 62,101,500,000 gallons, this being, however, greater by 3,211,- 
200,000 gallons than the quantity at the beginning of the year. 

The water in the Wachusett Reservoir at the beginning of the year 
was 15.13 feet below high-water mark, and it continued to fall until 
February 6, when it was 17.08 feet below the high-water mark of the 
reservoir. From this time the water rose until June 14, when it 
reached a maximum elevation of 394.4 feet, or 0.6 of a foot below 
high water. At this time the reservoir held 64,161,000,000 gallons. 
From June 14 there was a constant drawing down of the water until 
the end of the year, when the quantity held in storage was 48,667,- 
800,000 gallons, and the water stood at 12.83 feet below high-water 
mark. ISTo water was, therefore, discharged over the waste-weir into 
the river below the dam, although in accordance with the require- 
ments of the Water Act an average of 2,536,000 gallons per day was 
drawn by pipes from the reservoir into the river. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 23 

The action of the waves has again caused a considerable recession 
of the banks both npon the north and south sides of the reservoir, and 
consequently it has been necessary to strip the soil from additional 
areas of land along the shores. Considerable quantities of roots, 
stumps and other debris have been collected about the reservoir and 
burned. Brush and weeds have been mowed along the entire margin 
of the reservoir. The slopes of the North and South dikes have been 
fertilized with material collected from the Clinton filter-beds. Addi- 
tional town and property monuments have been erected, and various 
other improvements have been effected. There are 14 houses belong- 
ing to the Water Works which are rented, largely to employes of the 
Board, and considerable repairs are necessary to keep the buildings 
and grounds in good condition. 

Some receipts have been had from the pasturage on outlying lands 
in the vicinity of the reservoir and from sand and gravel which have 
been sold. The grass about the shores of the reservoir and on outlying 
lands has been sold for sums aggregating $2,347.50. 

An act was passed by the Legislature of the year 1909 authorizing 
the Board to permit, by lease, license or other agreement, the con- 
struction and maintenance of lines for the purpose of transmitting 
electric power over lands and waters held by the Board for water- 
supply purposes, it being provided, however, that no such permis- 
sion should be given for a period of more than fifteen years. 

Accordingly the Board granted to the Connecticut River Trans- 
mission Company permission to extend a line from a point in the 
northerly portion of the reservoir lands, along the northeasterly side 
of the reservoir and crossing the North Dike, a distance of about 6,100 
feet, for the transmission of electricity to the Lancaster Mills. The 
Company has also been granted the privilege of erecting and main- 
taining a power-transmission line along the northwesterly side of 
the reservoir and crossing the reservoir at a point easterly of the 
Worcester Street Bridge. For these privileges the Company is to 
pay the sum of $400 per year. 

The Sudbury Reservoir, which receives not only the comparatively 
small amount of water supplied from the watershed but also all of 
the water which is brought from the Wachusett Reservoir, has been 
kept substantially full during the entire year, and for nearly six 
months the water has been allowed to flow over the crest of the dam 



24 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and into Eramingham Reservoir No. 3, from which the water is 
drawn directly for the supply of the District. 

Considerable improvements have been made in the swimming pool, 
which had been provided in the previous year for the benefit of the 
town of Southborough, by lessening the grade of the slopes of the 
shores and decreasing its depth, in order to render the pool more con- 
venient and safe for bathers. The expense has been shared with the 
town of Southborough, and there have been provided by the town and 
its citizens other improvements to make the bathing pool more avail- 
able for its purposes. 

The ledge rock at the foot of the overflow of the Sudbury Dam, 
which had somewhat disintegrated through the combined action of 
frost and water and had been gradually wearing away, has been 
treated with cement concrete, and the cavities and open joints and 
seams have been pointed. 

The water in Framingham Reservoir No. 3, in which is received 
a portion of the supply furnished from the Sudbury Reservoir and 
from which it is discharged into the Sudbury Aqueduct, has been 
maintained but little below the crest of the dam during the year. 
No water has been allowed to waste. A considerable amount of 
fencing has been done on the marginal lands of the reservoir in order 
to prevent the cattle from gaining access to the water from the adja- 
cent pastures. Fences have also been to a considerable extent built 
about the Hopkinton Reservoir, to protect the lands of the Common- 
wealth. 

In Lake Cochituate the water was maintained during the first half 
of the year at a little below high-water mark. Later the lake was 
drawn down to a depth of about 8 feet, but subsequently the water 
was allowed to rise, until at the end of the year it was 5% feet below 
high-water mark. 

Considerable work has been done during the year for the purpose 
of protecting the purity of the water and improving the conditions 
around the lake. Several strips of land have been acquired in order 
to increase the margins controlled by the Board, and several coves 
about the lake where the water was shallow have been filled with 
material excavated from the bed of the lake. 

Surveys have been made and plans completed for the construction 
of works for the diversion of the surface drainage from Cochituate 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 25 

Village and to carry this drainage outside the watershed. Proposals 
for the construction of the work under the specifications prepared 
were offered, but the lowest bid which was received was so great 
that it was evident that the entire work could not be finished within 
the appropriation of $30,000, which had been made by the Legislature 
for that purpose. This was largely for the reason that it seemed 
necessary in making definite specifications to include some additional 
work beyond that which had been made the subject of the estimates, 
and labor and materials had also seemed to advance since the original 
estimates were made. It was, therefore, deemed wiser to reject all 
of the bids and to postpone the work until another season, in the 
meantime recommending to the Legislature an additional appropria- 
tion of $6,000. Advantage, however, was taken of the low state of 
the water to extend a pipe across the culvert between the north and 
middle divisions of the lake, which could not ordinarily be done 
early in the season. It is expected that if the increased expenditure 
is authorized the work will be begun at an early period of the season 
and completed during the year. 

The smaller reservoirs were generally kept about full during the 
year and there were no extra repairs required upon them. 

From the Wachusett Reservoir an average of 99,312,000 gallons 
per day was drawn through the Wachusett Aqueduct into the Sud- 
bury Reservoir. From the Sudbury Reservoir an average of 29,440,- 
000 gallons per day was drawn through the Weston Aqueduct for 
distribution into the Metropolitan District, and directly from the 
Sudbury Reservoir, through Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 81,046,- 
000 gallons per day were conveyed to Chestnut Hill through the Sud- 
bury Aqueduct. There was also drawn from Framingham Reservoir 
No. 2 and conveyed through the Sudbury Aqueduct an average of 
2,467,000 gallons per day, and from Lake Cochituate an average of 
6,774,000 gallons per day was drawn and conveyed through the 
Cochituate Aqueduct to the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. The Spot Pond 
watershed furnished 289,890 gallons per day. Over 40 per cent, 
more water was drawn from Lake Cochituate during the year than 
in the preceding year. On the other hand, about 8,000,000 gallons 
per day less were drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir, being a de- 
crease of a little more than 13 per cent. 

A small quantity of water was drawn from the Hopkinton Reser- 



26 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

voir which was supplied to the District through Framingham Reser- 
voir JSTo. 2, but no water was furnished to the District from Framing- 
ham Reservoir "No. 1, Ashland Reservoir, Whitehall Reservoir or 
Farm Pond. The town of Framingham, however, obtained the 
larger portion of its water supply through the filter gallery from 
Farm Pond, though a small portion was also directly taken from the 
Sudbury Aqueduct. 

(3) Distributing Reservoirs. 

The following are the distributing reservoirs and standpipes main- 
tained by the Board within the Metropolitan District : — 

Capacity in 
Gallons. 

Spot Pond, 1,791,700,000 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 300,000,000 

Weston Reservoir, . 200,000,000 

Fells Reservoir, 41,400,000 

Mystic Reservoir, . . 26,200,000 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 13,500,000 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 5,100,000 

Bear Hill Reservoir, . . . 2,450,000 

Arlington Standpipe, 550,000 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, 330,000 

Total, 2,381,230,000 

These reservoirs, having a total capacity of 2,381,230,000 gallons, 
are kept full during the year, not only for the purpose of providing 
for a proper distribution of water throughout the District, but also 
in order to afford protection and relief in cases of accident and 
emergencies. The distributing reservoirs would, even if the outside 
sources of supply were all cut off, furnish the regular supply of the 
District for a period of nearly 20 days. 

(4) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in operation for periods amounting 
to nearly 306 days during the year. The masonry interior of the 
aqueduct was not cleaned during the year, but it was necessary to 
remove the weeds and grasses from the open channel, which was ac- 
complished while the channel was emptied in order to introduce the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 27 

pipe for the Westborough Insane Hospital. The water was, bow- 
ever, cnt off for the purpose of increasing tbe storage in the reservoir 
at times when there was a sufficient supply for the District from the 
smaller reservoirs which otherwise would have been overflowing. The 
Sudbury Aqueduct was in continuous use during the year and the 
Cochituate Aqueduct was in operation for periods amounting to more 
than 125 days. The Weston Aqueduct was in service for about 359 
days, its operation being suspended at intervals amounting to about 
7 days. 

Some renovation and repairs were required upon the Wachusett 
Aqueduct, and it was also deemed advisable to construct fences along 
•considerable portions of the open channel and aqueduct, in order 
to prevent cattle from entering upon the aqueduct lands. It was nec- 
essary thoroughly to repoint and in places to relay the exposed brick- 
work of Echo Bridge on the Sudbury Aqueduct. The sodding upon 
the embankments of this aqueduct and of the Weston and Cochitu- 
ate aqueducts has been improved, and considerable fencing has been 
erected along the latter to protect the lands of the Commonwealth. 

(5) Pumping Stations. 

The pumping stations maintained by the Board are the high-service 
and low-service pumping stations at Chestnut Hill, the Spot Pond 
pumping station, the Arlington pumping station and the West Rox- 
bury pumping station. By the introduction of water for the supply 
of the District through the Weston Aqueduct by gravity the pumping 
of 25 per cent, of the entire quantity of the water consumed has been 
saved. All of the remainder of the water furnished, which is sup- 
plied through the Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts, is pumped at 
either the high or low service station at Chestnut Hill. The total 
quantity pumped at the two Chestnut Hill stations has been 32,618,- 
420,000 gallons, which is 8.4 per cent, less than that pumped by the 
two stations during the preceding year. The water is received at 
Spot Pond by pumping from the Chestnut Hill station, and from the 
Spot Pond station as well as from the Arlington and West Roxbury 
stations water is pumped into the higher regions embraced within the 
District. 

The total quantity of water pumped at all the stations during the 
year was 35,762,190,000 gallons, which was 8.7 per cent, less than 



28 METROPOLITAN WATER {Pub. Doc. 

the quantity pumped during the preceding year. The total cost of 
operating all the stations was $106,902.03, or $2,989 per million 
gallons pumped, — a decrease of $0,055 from the cost of the preced- 
ing year. 

The total amount of coal purchased during the year for use at the 
various stations was 11,341.77 gross tons. Of this total, 7,407.79 
tons were bituminous, 328.16 tons anthracite, 3,002.10 tons buck- 
wheat anthracite and 603.72 tons were anthracite screenings. The 
average price per gross ton for the bituminous coal at the several sta- 
tions varied, chiefly on account of differences in cost of transporta- 
tion, from $3.96 to $4.23. The average cost of the anthracite coal 
was $6.01 per gross ton, of the buckwheat anthracite $2.68, and of 
the anthracite screenings $2.49. 

Under contracts for the purchase of bituminous coal the approxi- 
mate amounts of thermal units, volatile matter and other constituents 
required have been specified. In cases where the coal furnished has 
been inferior to the specifications deductions have been made in the 
contract price; on the other hand, where coal has been furnished of 
a superior quality a corresponding increase in payment has been 
allowed. The result has been that coal of a better quality than last 
year has been received. For the purpose of such determinations fre- 
quent tests of the coal furnished • have been required ; and in like 
manner the oils which are furnished for the pumping stations are 
frequently tested in order to determine whether they are furnished 
in accordance with the contract. 

The cost per million gallons of water raised one foot was, for the 
Chestnut Hill high-service station, $0,027; for the Chestnut Hill low- 
service station, $0,037; for the Spot Pond station, $0,040; for the 
Arlington station, $0,114; and for the West Roxbury station, $0,223. 
The average cost at all the stations of raising one million gallons of 
water one foot high has been $0.0349, — which is slightly less than 
the average cost in the previous year. 

As stated in the report of last year, the increased demands for 
pumping which were put upon the West Roxbury pumping station 
were such that it was determined necessary to increase the capacity 
of that station. Accordingly, a small addition was made to the 
building, and a pumping engine which formerly belonged to the city 
of Melrose, and was taken by the Board, was put into proper repair 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 29 

and removed to this station. A new boiler was also provided. The 
repairs of the engine and necessary piping, as well as some other 
work, were performed by the regular maintenance force. The entire 
expenditure for the purpose was $5,782.94. 

While there has been a decrease of 3,394,430,000 gallons in the 
total quantity of water pumped at the different stations, this decrease 
has especially occurred at the Chestnut Hill low-service pumping sta- 
tion, and also at the Spot Pond pumping station, where a large re- 
duction occurred on account of the more general introduction of 
meters, especially in Melrose and Swampscott. 

(6) Pipe Lines. 

The system of mains has increased by 7.88 miles during the past 
year, making the aggregate maintained by the Board at the end of 
the year 92.53 miles. The length of the various mains 4 inches and 
more in diameter, connected with the Metropolitan System, but 
owned and operated by the several cities and towns through which 
water was supplied from the Metropolitan Works, was 1,602.62 miles. 

Two breaks in the main pipes occurred during the year, both of 
which caused considerable damage from water to private property. 
One was in the 4-8-inch main in Brighton, which was quickly re- 
paired. The more serious one occurred on Christmas Eve in the 
48-inch main in Harvard Square in Cambridge, causing the escape 
of a large quantity of water. This occurred in unfortunate weather, 
in the latter part of the evening, but was repaired and again in use 
at midnight of the following day. The injuries to the two mains 
occasioned the expenditure of a little more than $800 ; but in the 
former case the damage to property was small, while the latter case, 
owing to the character of the buildings flooded, involved a loss of 
nearly $20,000. In both cases the breaks occurred from causes be- 
yond the control of the Board. In the latter case a claim for reim- 
bursement will be made. There were in addition 31 leaks on the 
pipe lines from various causes, several of them from defective joints. 

The abolition of a grade crossing on the Boston & Maine Railroad 
in Maiden called for a relocation of a 30-inch high-service main about 
1,000 feet in length. Though the larger part of the work of reloca- 
tion was performed by the Board, the expense will ultimately be paid 
out of the fund for abolishing grade crossings. 



30 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

A large amount of work is necessitated on account of the relocation 
required by the Cambridge Subway, and while a portion of this work 
is performed by the Boston Elevated Railway Company, the entire 
expense will be paid by that Company. The existing 48-inch main 
passing through Central Square, with a length of about 1,200 feet, 
has been relocated, and the larger part of the change has already 
been accomplished. A change in the location of the 48-inch main 
passing through Harvard Square will be required during the coming 
year. 

Considerable other work of lesser amount in connection with the 
pipe lines has been required in various parts of the District. 

(7) Clinton Sewerage Works. 

The quantity of sewage received at the Clinton pumping station 
from the Clinton sewers was increased by about 8.5 per cent, over 
that received during the preceding year, due in part to the large 
amount of surface water which entered the sewers and in part to the 
natural increase following the extension of the sewerage system of 
the town. 

The total cost of pumping the sewage was $3,192.10. The cost 
per million gallons pumped was $10.24, as against $10.96 last year, 
and the cost per million gallons of sewage raised one foot was $0,206, 
as against $0.22 last year. ■ 

In the filtration of the sewage an additional bed has been added 
during the past year and one of the old beds has been made to render 
much greater service. Other improvements in the filter-beds have been 
made by regrading the beds and by the introduction of additional 
lines of underdrains to improve the distributing ditches. The im- 
provements made in this year and the past years have been successful 
in increasing the efficiency of the filtration, and, as a consequence, in 
improving the character of the effluent from the filter-beds. The sum 
of $7,109.85 has been expended in the improvement of the filter-beds. 
There has been a slight increase in the cost of maintenance of the 
filter-beds over that of last year. The cost has amounted to $3,222.15, 
being $10.43 per million gallons of sewage treated. 

The sludge collected from the various filter-beds has been entirely 
used upon the grass land belonging to the Commonwealth on the 
North and South dikes and about the Wachusett Dam. 




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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 35 

(9) Sanitary Inspection. 

A constant inspection of the watersheds has been maintained dur- 
ing the past year by William W. Locke, C. E., who has had the help 
of two assistants. 

On the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 19 cases of typhoid 
fever were reported during the year. Precautions were taken by the 
sanitary inspectors in all cases to protect the water supply from 
pollution, and so far as known no harmful results have followed. 

During the year there have been reported on the Wachusett water- 
shed 9 cases of typhoid fever and 1 of dysentery, these all occurring 
in the town of Holden. All of these with the exception of 2 cases 
occurred in houses not supplied with water from a public water 
supply. The 2 cases excepted were at the Mt. Pleasant Hotel, from 
which originated an epidemic of typhoid fever resulting in 59 cases 
and 8 deaths, all of which cases, with the exception of the 2 men- 
tioned, developed outside of the watershed. The epidemic was as- 
cribed to a contamination of milk which had been supplied. 

Premises upon the watersheds have been inspected during the 
year for the purpose of ascertaining the number and condition of 
sewer connections and cesspools, and also the condition of privies, 
sink drainage, manufacturing wastes and other disturbing elements. 
Upon the Wachusett watershed there were inspected during the 
year 1,475 premises. During the year 7 new cesspools have been 
constructed, and under the requirements 16 new buildings, built 
upon the watershed, have been provided with cesspools. The sanitary 
condition of the watershed has been further improved by the removal 
of 4 buildings which were standing upon the territory belonging to 
the Commonwealth. The number of cases inspected upon the Sud- 
bury and Cochituate watersheds was 7,083. Upon the Sudbury 
watershed 44 old and 14 new premises were connected with public 
sewers, and upon the Cochituate watershed 33 old and 29 new prem- 
ises were so connected. 

(10) Forestry. 

The Board is obliged to exercise a care over more than 15.5 

square miles of land, the larger part of which is covered with trees. 

Not only has considerable forestry work been done for the care 

and improvement of tracts of existing woodland, but also a large 



36 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

portion of the cleared lands, particularly those directly about the 
reservoirs, has been planted with trees. On the margins of the Wa- 
chusett Reservoir, a total area of 1,341 acres has been planted, and 
of this aggregate 27.5 acres have been planted during the past year. 
This planting has been principally of white pine seedlings. Be- 
sides, areas covered more or less with woods have been improved by 
the thinning out of the trees and the removal of brush. Tree planting 
and improvement have also been effected in some of the outlying 
lands belonging to the Board, and particularly upon the highways 
through lands of the Board and on the forest roads through these 
lands. 

For the protection of the marginal lands a fire patrol has been 
found necessary, but, notwithstanding the precautions which have 
been taken, three fires of considerable extent have taken place during 
the year in which large areas have been burned over, and considerable 
damage has been done in the destruction of the newly planted trees. 

During the year there were used for planting on the Wachusett 
watershed 36,000 white pines, and 34,050 arbor vitas and maple 
seedlings were transplanted from the nursery to the margins of the 
highways. 

In the Lamson nursery on the north side of the reservoir there are 
58,100 arbor vitse and a considerable number of sugar maples, locusts, 
white oaks, ashes and walnuts. 

The Flagg nursery is maintained upon the south side of the reser- 
voir and now contains 23,350 white pines and 19,350 arbor vita?. 

Considerable forestry work has also been done on the margins of 
the Sudbury Reservoir, where 5,000 white pines have been planted 
during the past year and where brush and undesirable trees have been 
removed, and other areas have been improved by cutting. Some tree 
planting has been accomplished about the Ashland and Hopkinton 
reservoirs, and other work has been done around Lake Cochituate 
and along the Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts in the cutting out 
of underbrush and the removal of undesirable trees. 

(11) Moth Suppression. 

Much work has been required during the past year to prevent the 
depredations not only of the gypsy and brown-tail moths but of the 
elm-leaf beetle and the pine-tree weevil, and the amount which has 
been expended on different regions under the control of the Board 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 37 

has been a little in excess of that of last year, the total expenditure 
having amounted to $8,012.28. 

Nearly one-half of the amount expended was spent in the region 
about Spot Pond, where it was necessary again to attack the egg 
clusters of the gypsy moths and to spray the trees upon considerable 
areas. Much of the work was required in the southern part of the 
territory on the line between the Commonwealth's land and that of 
the city of Medford. There has been an increase in the number of 
gypsy moths about the Chestnut Hill Reservoir and also at Lake Co- 
chituate. The brown-tail moths have largely increased in the regions 
about the Sudbury Reservoir and they have also been found along 
the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct, about the Wachusett 
Dam and at the upper end of the Wachusett Reservoir in West Boyl- 
ston and Oakdale, as well as in the grounds about the Clinton sewer- 
age filter-beds. 

The pine-tree weevil has severely attacked the young pines which 
have been set out by the Board so that it has been necessary to cut 
off and burn many of the affected shoots. The trouble has arisen 
among the pines both about the Wachusett Reservoir and the Sud- 
bury Reservoir, affecting in different localities from one in three 
to one in twenty-five. 

Less trouble has been caused by the elm-leaf beetle than in the pre- 
ceding year. 

The efforts which have been made for the protection of the trees 
would have been sufficient to keep them from serious injury had there 
been similar effort on the part of those in ownership and control of 
neighboring lands. 

(12) Quality of the Water. 

According to the chemical examinations of the water made in. the 
laboratory of the State Board of Health during the past year the 
water supplied to the Metropolitan District has been superior in 
quality in most of the important elements to that of the preceding 
year. In the early part of the year, however, it was much affected 
in odor and taste by the presence of organisms which, though objec- 
tionable, were not injurious to health. One of these organisms, known 
as Asterionella, reached an unexpected and extraordinary develop- 
ment in the Wachusett Reservoir, and the numbers of these in- 
creased so greatly that they affected the water disagreeably and 



38 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

caused considerable complaint. These organisms gave to the water 
the taste and odor of the geranium. They prevail at nearly all times 
but it is only when they are found in so great numbers that they 
have produced a disagreeable effect. As the growth began in the 
Wachusett Reservoir the larger part of the water supplied to the 
District was affected by it. Other organisms of a different character 
were found in the waters of different sources of supply at different 
periods, so that for longer or shorter times one source was preferable, 
and at other periods another, for consumption for the District. 

(13) The Rainfall and Watee Supply. 

The rainfall on the several watersheds, and consequently the yield 
or amount of water collected, was greater than in the preceding 
year, but the amount of rainfall was still from 3% inches to 3% 
inches below the average year's rainfall as determined in accordance 
with the past records which have been kept. The rainfall on the 
Sudbury watershed was 41.75 inches, on the Wachusett watershed 
was 44.50 inches, and on the Cochituate watershed was 41.44 inches. 

The yield of water or the amount of water collected on the various 
watersheds does not necessarily correspond closely with the rainfall, 
as the proportion of the rainfall which reaches the reservoirs varies 
according to circumstances prevailing from time to time. The per- 
centage of rainfall collected on the Wachusett watershed was 43.3 
per cent., on the Sudbury watershed 31.5 per cent., and on the 
Cochituate watershed 32.9 per cent., of the entire rainfall. 

The amount of water collected on the Wachusett watershed in the 
year 1909 was only 0.78 of the average amount for the years since 
the measurements have been made, and the amount so collected on 
the Sudbury watershed was but 0.60 of the average. 

The measurements on the Wachusett watershed begin with the year 
1897, but on the Sudbury watershed they began to be recorded in the 
vear 1875. 

The unusually small amount of water yielded during the past six 
years, five of which have been peculiarly dry, is indicated by the 
accompanying diagrams, showing the comparative amounts collected 
in the successive years in the Wachusett and Sudbury watersheds. 

The average daily quantity of water furnished by the various 
sources of supply as determined by measurements at the pumping 



COMPARATIVE AMOUNTS OF WATER COLLECTED IN THE 

DIFFERENT YEARS ON THE SUDBURY AND WACHUSETT 

WATERSHEDS PER SQUARE MILE OF WATERSHED. 



SUDBURY WATERSHED 
1875 - 1909 



1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 



WACHUSETT WATERSHED 



1897 



909 



1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1308 
1909 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 39 

stations and of the flow through the Weston Aqueduct, and including 
the estimated yield of Spot Pond, was 119,386,000 gallons, as against 
a daily average of 127,301,000 gallons during the preceding year. 

VI. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with De- 
cember 1, 1908, and ending with November 30, 1909, was, in ac- 
cordance with the requirements of chapter 255 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 7. 

The more detailed statement of its doings required by said chap- 
ter, for the calendar year 1909, in relation to the Metropolitan Water 
Works, is herewith presented. 

The Metropolitan Water Loans authorized for the construction 
and acquisition of works have amounted to $41,798,000. To this 
sum are added the proceeds from the sale of certain property by the 
Board, and these amounted on January 1, 1910, to $257,071.66. 
The total amount, therefore, which the Board has been authorized 
to expend is $42,055,071.66. The amount of expenditures approved 
by the Board for payment out of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund 
was, for the year 1909, $359,667.13, and the total amount so ap- 
proved for payment since the beginning of the work up to January 
1, 1910, has been $41,044,304.64. There was accordingly a balance 
remaining at the beginning of the year 1910 amounting to $1,010,- 
767.02. 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth has issued from time to time, 
on the request of the Board, bonds to the amount of $40,898,000. 
These bonds were issued for terms of thirty-nine and one-half and 
forty years from the date of issue, and bear interest at the rate of 
3 per cent, and 3% per cent, per annum. The sinking fund estab- 
lished for the payment of the bonds at maturity amounted on Janu- 
ary 1, 1910, to $7,226,262.31. 

The increase in the debt, during the calendar year, as represented 
by the Metropolitan Water Loans outstanding, was $398,000. The 
increase of the sinking fund for the payment of the debt at maturity 
was, during the same period, $806,979.03. There has been, there- 
fore, a decrease of the net debt during the calendar year amounting 
to $408,979.03. 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The amount approved by the Board for the maintenance and op- 
eration of the Water Works for the year 1909, which was paid out of 
the annual assessments, was $397,166.41. 

The assessments for the year 1909, for the payment of interest on 
the bonds, for the sinking fund requirements and for the expenses 
of operation and maintenance of the Water Works, which were levied 
upon the various cities and towns in the Metropolitan District, 
amounted to $2,360,746.28. 

The detailed financial statement regarding the Metropolitan Water 
Works is as follows : — 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loans, Receipts and Payments. 

The loans authorized for the construction and acquisition of the 
Metropolitan Water Works, the receipts which are added to the 
proceeds of these loans, the expenditures for the construction and 
acquisition of works, and the balance available on January 1, 1910, 
have been as follows : — 



Loan under chapter 488 of the Acts of 1895, . 
Loan under chapter 453 of the Acts of 1901, . 
Loan under chapter 367 of the Acts of 1906, . 
Loan under chapter 558 of the Acts of 1908, . 
Loan under chapter 320 of the Acts of 1909, . 



Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the con- 
struction and acquisition of works : — 
For the year ending December 31, 1909, $4,504 79 

For the period prior to January 1, 1909, 162,566 87 



Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to the 
Metropolitan Water District paid into Loan Fund (St. 
1909, c. 320), 



$27,000,000 00 

13,000,000 00 

500,000 00 

398,000 00 

900,000 00 

$41,798,000 00 



167,071 m 



90.000 00 



Amount approved by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board for payments out of the Water Loan Fund : — 
For the year ending December 31, 1909, $359,667 13 
For the period prior to January 1, 1909, 40,684,637 51 



$42,055,071 66 



41,044,304 64 



Balance January 1, 1910, 



$1,010,767 01 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



(2) Issues of Metropolitan Water Loan Bonds. 
The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority given 
him to issue from time to time, on the request of the Board, nego- 
tiable bonds to an amount not exceeding $41,798,000, to be desig- 
nated the " Metropolitan Water Loan," has sold bonds as follows : — 



Date of Sale. 



Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 



Rate of 
Interest 

(Per 
Cent.). 



Price 
received. 



Date due. 



Premium. 



Sept. 25, 


1895, 










Nov. 23, 


1896, 










Feb. 8 


1897, 










Jan. 13 


1898, 










Mar. 2 


1898, 










June 15 


1899, 










June 28 


1900, 










Mar. 5 


1901, 










July 24 


1901, 










July 24 


1901, 










July 30 


1901, 










July 31 


1901, 










Aug. 7 


1901, 










Aug. 8 


1901, 










Aug. 8 


1901, 










Sept. 17 


1901, 










Oct. 1 


, 1901, 










Oct. 24 


1901, 










Feb. 26 


1902, 










Feb. 26 


1902, 










April 7 


1903, 










April 17 


1903, 










Jan. 15 


1904, 










Jan. 15 


1904, 










Mar. 24 


1905, 










June 28 


1908, 










June 28 


1906, 










June 28 


1906, 










Mar. 17 


, 1909, 











$5,000,000 

2,000,000 

6,000,000 

2,000,000 

2,000,000 

3,000,000 

1,000,000 

3,000,000 

100,000 

150,000 

205,000 

50,000 

50,000 

300,000 

200,000 

3,100,000 

1,345,000 

1,500,000 

500,000 

3,000,000 

250,000 

1,250,000 

500,000 

2,000,000 

650,000 

943,000 

100,000 

307,000 

398,000 



$A 

*A 

SA 
ZA 

3A 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

ZA 

3 

3 

ZA 

ZA 

ZA 

ZA 

ZA 
ZA 

za 

ZA 

ZA 
ZA 



$40,898,000 



110.67 


July 1, 


106.76268 


July 1, 


107.82 


July 1, 


113.176 


Jan. 1, 


112.877 


Jan. 1, 


100.64 


July 1, 


102.78 


July 1, 


102.155 


Jan. 1, 


100.375 


Jan. 1, 


100.10 


Jan. 1, 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 


100.50 


Jan. 1, 


100.10 


Jan. 1, 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 


106.71 


Jan. 1, 


100. 


Jan. 1, 


100. 


Jan. 1, 


109.13 


Jan. 1, 


109.13 


Jan. 1, 


106.725 


Jan. 1, 


106.1329 


Jan. 1, 


104.60 


Jan. 1, 


104.60 


Jan. 1, 


105.761 


Jan. 1, 


103.09 


Jan. 1, 


103. 09 2 


Jan. 1, 


103. 09 2 


Jan. 1, 


101. 16 6 


Jan. 1, 



1935 
1935 
1935 
1938 
1938 
1939 
1939 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1941 
1942 
1942 
1943 
1943 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1946 
1946 
1949 



$533,500 00 

135,253 60 1 

469,200 00 

263,520 00 

257,540 00 

19,200 00 

27,800 00 

64,650 00 

375 00 

150 00 

512 50 

125 00 

250 00 

300 00 

500 00 

208,010 00 



45,650 00 

273,900 00 

16,812 50 

76,661 25 

23,000 00 

92,000 00 

37,446 50 

29,138 70 

3,090 00 

9,486 30 

4,760 08 



2,592,831 43 



1 Including $18,673.60 from readjustment of rate made by the Treasurer in 1897. 

2 Not issued or delivered until 1907. 



42 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Prior to May 1, 1906, all premiums received from the sales of 
bonds were applied to the payment of the current charges in re- 
duction of the annual assessments, but since that date, under the 
provisions of chapter 337, Acts of 1906, they have been paid into the 
sinking fund. 



(3) Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund. 

The sinking fund established by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth has amounted at the end of each year to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 1895, 
December 31, 1896, 
December 31, 1897, 
December 31, 1898, 
December 31, 1899, 
December 31, 1900, 
December 31, 1901, 
December 31, 1902, 



$226,286 05 


699,860 


70 


954,469 


00 


1,416,374 29 


1,349,332 


97 


1,573,619 


72 


1,662,426 


95 


2,256,803 


81 



December 31, 1903, 

December 31, 1904, 

December 31, 1905, 

December 31, 1906, 

December 31, 1907, 

December 31, 1908, 

December 31, 1909, 



$2,877,835 59 
3,519,602 92 
4,207,045 69 
4,897,822 62 
5,643,575 69 
6,419,283 28 
7,226,262 31 



(4) Annual Assessments and Receipts. 
Assessments for the year, amounting to $2,360,746.28, were re- 
quired for the payment of the interest on the bonds issued by the 
Commonwealth, the sinking fund requirements and the expenses of 
operation and maintenance of the Water Works. The requirements 
were: for interest, $1,395,403.49 ; for the sinking fund, $520,331.43 ; 
and for maintenance and operation, $445,011.36. These assess- 
ments were made by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth upon the 
various municipalities as follows : — 



Arlington, . 


$17,442 46 


Maiden, 


$39,350 16 


Belmont, 


7,461 96 


Medford, 


36,752 69 


Boston, 


. 1,862,823 42 


Melrose, 


24,523 3S 


Chelsea, 


51,499 13 


Milton, 


15,455 71 


Everett, 


44,833 29 


Nahant, 


4,566 73 


Hyde Park, 


1,327 03 


Newton, 


6,524 98 


Lexington, . 


7,384 17 


Quincy, 


51,230 04 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 43 



Revere, . . . $23,140 55 

Somerville, . . . 112,573 20 

Stoneham, .' ' 10,234 41 

Swampseott, . . 11,120 03 



Watertown, . . $15,758 18 

Winthrop, . . . 16,744 76 



$2,380,746 28 



The comparatively smaller sums assessed upon the city of Newton 
and the town of Hyde Park were owing to the fact that neither of 
these municipalities had reached the safe capacity of its own sources 
of water supply, and neither had been furnished with water. 

The proceeds from the operations of the Board, exclusive of the 
proceeds from sales of property and of water, are required by statute 
to be applied to the payment of the interest, the sinking fund re- 
quirements and expenses of maintenance and operation of works. 
These for the year 1909 amounted to $6,210.94. 

The amount approved by the Board for the maintenance and opera- 
tion of the Metropolitan Water Works was, for the year 1909, $397,- 
166.41. 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of Dis- 
trict and to Water Companies. 
Sums have been received during the year 1909, under the pro- 
visions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as fol- 
lows : — 

Town of Framingham, . . . $313 34 

United States Government, . . . . . . . . 1,986 83 



$2,300 17 



The sums so received, prior to March 23, 1907, were annually 
distributed among the cities and towns of the District, but since 
that date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the 
Acts of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking 
fund. 



44 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



LPub. Doc. 



(6) EXPENDITURES FOR THE DIFFERENT WORKS. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the va- 
rious operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of 
Works. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 


Administration applicable to all parts of the con- 










struction and acquisition of the works, . 




$7,265 73 




$281,453 29 


Wachusett Dam and Reservoir: — 










Wachusett Dam, 


$897 77 




$2,377,907 01 




Power plant, 




75 00 




193 00 




North Dike, 




299 00 




792,264 68 




South Dike, 




1 00 




137,075 55 




Removal of soil, . 




96 51 




2,536,612 66 




Relocation of railroads, 




25 00 




881,872 45 




Roads and bridges, .... 




446 98 




547,867 76 




Real estate, 




1,551 09 




3,206,765 13 




Damages, real estate not taken, business 


and 










loss of wages, 




4,250 00 




532,247 07 




Other expenses 




- 


7,642 35 


8,547 92 


11,021,353 23 








Improving Wachusett watershed, . 






4,135 50 




228,492 57 


Wachusett Aqueduct, .... 






2 00 




1,797,948 85 


Sudbury Reservoir, .... 






- 




2,923,133 71 


Protection of Sudbury supply, 






- 




129,190 36 


Improving Sudbury watershed, . 






222 00 




95,711 84 


Protection of Cochituate supply, . 






- 




9,000 00 


Improving Cochituate watershed, 






- 




8,860 68 


Improving Lake Cochituate, 






4 00 




104,141 29 


Pipe lines, Dam No. 3 to Dam No. 1, . 






- 




48,471 48 


Pipe line, Rosemary siphon, 






- 




23,142 98 


Weston Aqueduct: — 












Aqueduct 




$1,627 35 




$2,353,820 11 




Reservoir, ...... 




- 




289,001 82 




Real estate, taxes and other expenses, 




- 




206,668 18 








1,627 35 




2,849,490 11 








Distribution system: — 










Low service: — 








• 


New 48-inch main, Section 31, 


$98,128 79 




$162,698 06 




Pipe lines and connections, .... 


135 25 




1,753,027 25 




Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, . 


- 




462,572 19 




Reservoir, Spot Pond 


- 




582,188 73 




Gate-house and connections, Chestnut Hill 










Reservoir, 


- 




65,480 88 




Real estate and other expenses, . . 


- 




91,725 56 




Amounts carried forward, 




$98,264 04 


$20,898 93 


$3,117,692 67 $19,520,390 39 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



Construction and Acquisition of 
Works. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Distribution system — Concluded. 
Northern high service: — 
Pipe lines and connections, 
Spot Pond pumping station, . 
Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, 
Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, 
Real estate and other expenses, 
Southern high service: — 
Pipe lines and connections, 
Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 
Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, 
Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 
Real estate and other expenses, 
Northern extra high service, 
Southern extra high service, 
Weston Aqueduct supply mains, 
Meters and connections, 
Improving Spot Pond Brook, . 
Glenwood pipe yard, . 
Chestnut Hill pipe yard, . 



Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased 
and sent first to storage yards, and later 
transferred, as needed, to the various parts of 
the work : — 

Amount received, ...... 

Transferred from storage yards to the various 
sections of the work and included in costs of 
special works, 

Diversion of water, South Branch of Nashua 
River, 1 ....... 

Acquisition of existing water works: — 

Reimbursement city of Boston, partially con- 
structed Reservoir, ...... 

Boston water works, taken January 1, 1898, 

Spot Pond taken from Maiden, Medford and 
Melrose, ........ 

Waban Hill Reservoir purchased from Newton, 

Expenses : — 

Engineering $22,617 52 

Conveyancing, .... 3,862 92 
Legal, expert and court, . . 46,648 03 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Amounts carried forward, 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 



$98,264 04 $20,898 93 



64,333 00 



50 
70 



8,237 

24 

96,212 

3,875 



271,068 76 



$3,117,692 67 $19,520,390 39 



504,908 26 
291,829 35 
141,392 94 

38,267 70 

14,838 05 

515,860 94 
247,152 38 

90,003 49 

61,592 11 

10,226 36 

90,955 06 

22,855 27 
683,754 14 

82,445 58 
3,991 23 

33,100 59 

11,311 26 
5,962,177 38 



$178,616 83 



111,168 39 



67,448 44 
251 00 



2,271,979 74 



2,134,144 16 



137,835 58 
1,363,935 31 



$359,667 13 



$1,157,921 59 
12,768,948 80 

1,240,229 62 
60,000 00 



73,128 47 



$15,300,228 48 $26,984,338 66 



1 Of the total expenditures from the beginning of the work, the sum of $150,939. 
age system. 



is for Clinton sewer- 



46 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Construction and Acquisition op 
Works. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 




. $359,667 13 


$15,300,228 48 $26,984,338 66 


Deduct following, transferred and charged to 






special works : — 






Reimbursement city of Boston, 






transferred to Sudbury Reser- 






voir $1,157,921 59 






Waban Hill Reservoir transferred 






to Distribution Department, . 60,000 00 






Stock — pipes, engines, etc., in- 






cluded with Boston Water 






Works and transferred to Dis- 






tribution Department, . . 22,340 91 




1,240,262 50 






. $359,667 13 


tiA n^o ofi=; 03 






Total for construction and acquisition of works, 


. $41,044,304 64 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Administration, .... 

General supervision, 
Taxes and other expenses, 
Wachusett Reservoir Department: — 

Superintendence 

Reservoir 

Forestry, 

Protection of supply, 

Buildings and grounds, . 

Wachusett Dam 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system: — 
Pumping station, 
Sewers, screens and filter-beds, . 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, .... 



Sudbury Department: — 
Superintendence, Framingham office, . 
Ashland Reservoir, .... 
Hopkinton Reservoir, .... 
Whitehall Reservoir, .... 
Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 
Sudbury Reservoir, .... 

Lake Cochituate 

Marlborough Brook filters, . 

Pegan filters 



Amounts carried forward, . 



224 72 
,986 39 
( 657 42 
,604 92 
461 58 
605 00 
,476 97 

306 49 
565 45 
699 82 
665 41 



343 05 

,736 07 

162 54 

408 47 

,115 11 

,345 72 

849 83 

109 69 

876 18 



$10,147 89 
30,685 37 
36,450 10 



56,254 17 



),946 66 $133,537 53 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



47 



Maintenance and Operation. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Sudbury Department — Con. 
Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 
Sanitary inspection, 
Cochituate Aqueduct, . 
Sudbury Aqueduct, 
Weston Aqueduct, .... 
Improving Lake Cochituate, 



Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, . 

West Roxbury pumping station, pumping service, 

Arlington standpipe, 

Bear Hill Reservoir, . . . , 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds 

Fells Reservoir 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, . . 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, 

Mystic Reservoir, ......... 

Waban Hill Reservoir 

Weston Reservoir, ......... 

Spot Pond, 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, 

Northern high service 

Southern high service, ....... 

Supply pipe lines, 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, . . . . . . . . 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables, 

Waste prevention, ......... 

Venturi meters, ......... 

Measurement of water, 

Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, 



Total for maintaining and operating works, 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



),946 66 $133,537 53 



3,063 19 


2,958 13 


4,224 14 


10,390 08 


4,880 29 


423 90 


ec oofl on 




$4,689 14 


7,844 17 


33,012 64 


50,655 48 


13,650 68 


12,976 25 


43 67 


155 25 


10,476 73 


460 54 


908 12 


1,097 19 


1,028 10 


265 25 


2,380 65 


8,036 67 


304 07 


20,201 04 


4,548 06 


3,248 40 


566 37 


3,060 66 


911 21 


3,567 05 


9,478 44 


16 00 


2,043 97 


942 64 


174 05 


10fi 7rt° <1 n 




. $397,166 41 



48 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expendi- 
tures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 
1909. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1909, and ending December 31, 1909, is $359,667.13, 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1909, is 
$41,044,304.64. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year have 
been $397,166.41, and from the beginning of the work, $3,811,- 
047.26. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and other expenses of admin- 
istration, have been apportioned to the construction of the works and 
to the maintenance and operation of the same, and appear under each 
of those headings. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



49 



The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character : — 



General Character or Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition bt 
Purchase or Taking. 

Administration . 
Commissioners, 
Secretary and auditor, . 
Clerks and stenographers, 
Legal services, 

Traveling, .... 
Stationery and printing, 
Postage, express and telegrams, 
Furniture and fixtures, . 
Alterations and repairs of buildings, 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of 

building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, . 
Miscellaneous expenses 

Engineering . 
Chief engineer and department engineers, 
Principal assistant engineers, 
Engineering assistants, . 
Consulting engineers, 

Inspectors 

Architects, .... 

Railroad and street car travel, 

Wagon hire, .... 

Stationery and printing, 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Books, maps and photographic supplies, 

Furniture and fixtures, . . . 

Alterations and repairs of buildings: — 

Main office 

Sub-offices, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of 
buildings: — 

Main office, ..... 

Sub-offices, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 
Rent of sub-offices and other buildings, 
Field offices and sheds, .... 
Clinton office building, . . . . . 

Unclassified supplies 

Miscellaneous expenses, .... 



Amounts carried forward, 



$3,500 00 

750 00 

1,790 00 

20 00 

511 21 

110 00 

2 25 

5 90 

294 71 

242 56 

39 10 



$797 79 
5,988 53 

4,878 38 

67 36 
39 75 

282 58 

82 

1 50 

28 27 

20 76 



1 10 



884 27 

42 70 

727 70 



10 69 

18 72 



f,265 73 



13,790 92 



$118,476 91 

49,842 03 

60,974 16 

2,359 00 

3,660 89 

11,735 17 

2,917 17 

4,283 14 

5,790 17 

11,697 08 
5,182 90 
4,534 67 



$207,471 36 

158,011 30 

1,038,014 22 

24,415 07 

295,760 51 

36,161 19 

26,884 62 

45,337 53 

26,418 87 

7,730 00 

19,309 53 

24,990 28 

6,989 22 

14,978 46 

14,108 96 
2,939 36 



25,757 66 
19,667 82 
15,317 15 
4,526 74 
1,274 49 
9,866 87 
8,251 22 
8,944 99 



$281,453 29 



. $21,056 65 



2,043,127 42 



2,324,580 71 



50 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 






$21,056 65 




$2,324,580 71 


Construction. 










Preliminary work (borings, test pits and other 










investigations): — 










Advertising, ....... 


$116 11 




$6,458 91 




Other preliminary work as given in detail in 










preceding annual report, 


- 


116 11 


155,457 41 


161,916 32 








Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir: — 










Contracts completed and final payments made 










prior to January 1, 1909 


- 




$5,406,738 30 




McBride & Co., Stillwater improvement, 


- 




23,314 67 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, . 


$75 51 


75 51 


3,552 11 


5,433,605 08 








Contracts completed, improving Wachusett Water- 










shed: — 










Sterling filter-beds 




- 




11,893 75 


Contracts completed, Wachusett Aqueduct, 




- 




1,447,208 55 


Contracts completed, Sudbury Reservoir, . 




- 




1,545,028 33 


Contracts completed, protection Sudbury sup- 










ply:— 










City of Marlborough, main sewer, 




- 




9,000 00 


Contracts completed, improving Lake Cochitu- 










ate, 




- 




60,657 45 


Contracts completed, protection Cochituate sup- 










ply: — 










Town of Framingham, low-level sewer, 




- 




9,000 00 


Contracts completed, Rosemary siphon, 




- 




5,916 96 


Contracts completed, pipe line, Dam No. 3 to 










Dam No. 1, . 




- 




17,240 22 


Contracts completed, Clinton sewerage system, . 




- 




66,878 22 


Contracts, Weston Aqueduct: — 










Contracts completed and final payments made 










prior to January 1, 1909, 


- 




$1,781,564 31 




Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 2, 


- 




201,827 74 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, . 


$323 95 




3,235 75 




Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 3, 


- 




126,420 70 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, . 


330 00 




4,544 78 




Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 6, 


- 




108,933 26 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, . 


566 80 




7,579 85 




Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 12, 


- 




138,151 78 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, . 


406 60 


1,627 35 


3,746 37 


2,376,004 54 






$ 




$22,875 62 


13,468,930 13 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



51 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Construction — Con. 
Contracts, Distribution System: — 
Contracts completed and final payments made 

prior to January 1, 1909, .... 
Allis-Chalmers Co., pumping engine, 
Coffin Valve Co., water valves, . 
Warren Foundry and Machine Co., cast-iron 

pipes and special castings, 
Bruno & Petitti, laying water pipes on Sect. 31 

(new 48-inch main), .... 

Camoia & Williams, laying water pipes on Sect 

32 

Angelo De Marco & Co., laying water pipes on 

Sect. 34, 

Coffin Valve Co., water valves, . 

The Builders Iron Foundry Co., 60-inch Venturi 

meter tube 

Standard Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., cast 

iron pipes and special castings, 
Camoia & Williams, laying water pipes on Sect. 33 
Chas. J. Jacobs Co., laying water pipes on Sect 

8 of Weston Aqueduct supply mains, 
Florence Iron Works, cast-iron pipes and special 

castings, 

Standard Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., cast- 
iron pipes and special castings, 
U. S. Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., cast-iron 

pipes and special castings, 

Deduct value of pipes, valves, etc., included in 
above list, transferred to maintenance account 
December 31, 1900, '. 

Additional work: — 
Labor, 

Professional services, medical services, analyses, 



Traveling, . 








Rent, . 








Water rates, 








Freight and express, 








Jobbing and repairing, 






Tools, machinery, appliances 


and 


hardware 


supplies, .... 






Electrical supplies, 






Castings, ironwork and metals, 






Iron pipe and valves, 









Amounts carried forward, 



$3,480 37 
5,827 80 

58,693 59 

29,669 85 

3,473 99 

1,822 56 
9,750 00 

2,350 00 

55,984 59 
12,444 78 

20,978 75 

38,462 84 

3,395 75 

58,604 27 



$10,657 31 

75 00 

2 90 

90 49 

449 67 
12 05 

924 37 

16 82 

1,658 25 

602 90 



$22,875 62 



304,939 14 



$13,468,930 13 



$14,489 76 $327,814 76 



$4,429,206 12 
8,375 37 
7,198 00 

101,990 55 

38,909 55 

3,473 99 

1,822 56 
9,750 00 

2,350 00 

55,984 59 
12,444 78 

20,978 75 

38,462 84 

3,395 75 

58,604 27 



$4,792,947 12 
3,139 77 



4,789,807 35 



$768,401 65 

1,982 99 
2,747 10 
3,702 22 
1,454 77 
13,469 32 
9,698 18 

78,338 25 

5,378 63 

83,706 04 

62,053 17 



$1,030,932 32 $18,258,737 48 



52 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Construction — Con. 
Blasting supplies, 
Paint and coating, 
Fuel, oil and waste, . 
Lumber and field buildings, 
Drain pipe, 

Brick, cement and stone, . 
Sand, gravel and filling, 
Municipal and corporation work, 
Police service, 
Sanitary inspection, . 
Judgments and settlements for damages, 
Unclassified supplies, . 
Miscellaneous expenses, 

Legal and expert: — 
Legal services, 
Expert services, . 
Court expenses, . 
Miscellaneous expenses, 



Real Estate. 

Legal and expert: — 
Legal services, 
Conveyancer and assistants, 
Experts, 
Appraisers, . 
Court expenses, . 
Counsel expenses, 
Conveyancing supplies, 
Conveyancing expenses, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 

Settlements made by Board, 

Judgments, 

Taxes and tax equivalents, 

Care and disposal, . 



Damages to Real Estate not taken, to Business and 

on Account of Loss of Wages. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, 

Expert services, . 

Court expenses, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, 
Settlements, . 
Judgments, 



Amounts carried forward, 



$14,489 76 $327,814 76 $1,030,932 32 $18,258,737 48 



$8 00 

120 02 

38 15 

1,157 64 

558 93 

37 50 

6,064 56 



500 00 
454 11 
115 07 



$340 00 



3 00 



3,440 00 



25 63 



$700 00 
3,550 00 



23,543 74 



3,808 63 



4,250 00 



),417 13 



$1,944 88 

4,473 53 

10,553 30 

87,194 78 

9,163 80 

27,058 72 

6,939 66 

215,071 99 

210,801 74 

13,107 09 

53,124 26 

17,711 52 

6,068 47 



1,694,146 06 



4,668 82 

1,862 66 

1,317 20 

185 80 



8,034 48 



$4,736 31 

110,382 97 

17,871 58 

22,332 75 

11,139 43 

43 25 

3,184 53 

5,937 54 

4,326 15 

3,391,312 84 

170,445 63 

68,182 41 

86,891 69 



3,896 787 08 



$1,130 67 

2,857 62 

15,394 34 

125 00 

415,513 65 

116,733 42 



551,754 70 



$24,409,459 80 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



53 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Claims on Account of Diversion of Water, 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, ...... 

Expert services, '. 

Court expenses, ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 

Settlements 

Judgments, 



Purchase of Existing Water Works. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, 

Expert services, . 

Court expenses, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, 
Settlements and judgments, 

Relocation Central Massachusetts Railroad. 
Settlements, 



Total amount of construction expenditures, 




$24,409,459 80 



53. 774 98 
19,339 69 

20.775 49 
1,289 58 

917,350 00 
220,969 67 



1,183,499 41 



$1,878 89 

13,569 82 

29,728 38 

1,470 94 

15,227,100 01 



15,273,748 04 



177,597 39 



$41,044,304 64 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, ....... 

Rent, ........... 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel, 

Lighting, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, . . . . 
Miscellaneous expenses, ....... 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel 

Lighting, 

Amounts carried forward, ...... 



$3,500 00 


4,722 38 


447 17 


16 95 


21 06 


69 92 


114 50 


1,138 68 


40 42 


86 91 


425 38 


$25,303 03 


1,341 55 


309 87 


64 19 


215 12 



$10,583 37 



$27,233 76 $10,583 37 



54 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Amounts brought forward, ....... 

Maintenance and Operation of Works — Con, 
General supervision — Con. 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, . . . . . . . * . 

Miscellaneous expenses, . ....... 

Pumping service : — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Repairs, 

Small supplies, 

Rent, West Roxbury pumping station, 

Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Superintendents, 

Engineering assistants, 

Sanitary inspectors, ........ 

Labor, pay roll, 

Labor, miscellaneous, ........ 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations, 

Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures, . 

Automobiles, 

Brick, 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, .... 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Cement and lime, ......... 

Drafting and photo supplies, 

Fertilizer and planting material, ...... 

Freight and express, 

Fuel, 

Gypsy moth supplies, 

Hardware, .......... 

Hay and grain, 

Horses 

Lighting, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, .......... 

Paints and oils, ......... 

Pipe and fittings 

Postage, . 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, .... 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Stable expenses, ......... 

Sand, gravel and stone, . . • . 

Traveling expenses, ........ 

Amounts carried forward, ....... 



§27,233 76 $10,583 37 



$40 00 
428 69 
704 87 
324 86 
1,953 19 



W5.328 50 

42,351 50 

1,643 66 

5,896 74 

2,124 00 

794 82 



$6,466 35 

8,584 19 

4,024 00 

125,464 42 

2,912 05 

1,070 98 

1,618 14 

4,549 94 

364 41 

95 03 

1,606 97 

606 23 

284 08 

966 07 

633 73 

2,854 18 

791 88 

1,000 78 

3,422 06 

502 02 
1,640 61 

696 83 

765 47 
13,553 18 

114 97 
1,142 39 

222 04 
1,027 88 

181 34 
2,682 22 



30,685 37 



118,139 22 



$189,844 44 $159,407 96 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



55 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Amounts brought forward, 



Maintenance and Operation op Works — Con. 
Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 

Telephones, . . . , 

Teaming, 

Tools and appliances 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, ...... 

Municipal and corporation work, 

Miscellaneous expenses 



Payments in lieu of taxes, ..... 
Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



$189,844 44 $159,407 96 



1,437 61 
851 43 
1,110 64 
523 37 
2,695 66 
5,420 68 

201,883 83 

35,874 62 



$397,166 41 



(b) Receipts. 
The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1909, 
and ending December 31, 1909, is $108,761.48, and the total amount 
from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, 
July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1909, is $652,593.82. The general 
character of these receipts is as follows : — 



General Character of Receipts. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 


For distribution back to District: — 










Fees for admission to District, .... 


- 




$92,265 00 




Water furnished to cities and towns outside of 










District, 


- 




90,454 77 




Water furnished to water companies, 


- 


- 


37,145 88 


$219,865 65 


To the credit of the loan fund: — 






Real estate and buildings 


$3,047 50 




$38,048 02 




Tools, supplies and reimbursements, 


1,457 29 




129,023 64 




District entrance fees (Swampscott) , 


90,000 00 


$94,504 79 


90,000 00 


257,071 66 


To the credit of the maintenance fund: — 






Tools, supplies and reimbursements, 


$5,745 58 


5,745 58 


$7,225 74 


7,225 74 


To the credit of the sinking fund: — 






Water furnished to cities and towns outside of 










District and to water companies, . 


$2,300 17 




$16,851 21 




Forfeiture for contracts awarded but not exe- 










cuted, 


- 




500 00 




Rents, ........ 


1,110 38 




92,439 37 




Land products 


4,975 02 




55,382 28 




Unclassified receipts and interest, 


125 54 


8,511 11 


3,257 91 


168,430 77 










$108,761 48 


$652,593 82 



56 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



Sources of Receipts. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 


Admission into Metropolitan Water Distric 


t 






(Quincy, Nahant, Arlington, Stoneham, Milton 








Lexington and Swampscott), 


§90,000 00 


$182,265 00 




Supplying water to cities and towns outside o 


f 






Water District (Swampscott, Revere, Lexing 








ton, Wakefield, Cambridge, Framingham anc 


I 






U. S. Government), and to water companie 


3 






(Framingham, Milton and Revere), . 


2,300 17 


144,451 86 






?o° °on 17 




$326,716 86 




Oi7i,OUU 1 t 




Construction and acquisition of works: — 








Administration, ...... 


S74 55 


$243 95 




Wachusett Dam, .... 




. 


6,759 48 




Wachusett Reservoir, .... 




665 84 


135,674 87 




Wachusett Aqueduct, 




- 


5,204 70 




Weston Aqueduct, .... 




- 


5,137 63 




Sudbury Reservoir, .... 




2,820 00 


10,615 42 




Distribution system, .... 




998 95 


74,358 28 




Diversion of water, Clinton sewerage system, 


- 


1,367 94 




Purchase of existing water works, 


75 00 


18,119 08 






/l R -! 'i 




257,481 35 


Maintenance and operation of works: — 


^,1)0*1 oo 




Administration, ...... 


$15 73 


$118 56 




General supervision, .... 




490 79 


802 76 




Wachusett Aqueduct, 




300 41 


4,680 07 




Wachusett Reservoir, .... 




4,698 22 


27,986 57 




Sudbury system, .... 




1,859 73 


15,463 38 




Distribution system, .... 




3,961 12 


14,465 53 




Clinton sewerage system, . 




500 96 


4,87S 74 






1 1 ooc no 




68,395 61 


' » 


ii,o^u yu 








. 8108,761 48 


$652,593 82 



(c) Assets. 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a coniplete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 



Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; 
machinery, tools' and other appliances and supplies ; real estate connected 
with works not completed; completed works, including real estate and 
buildings connected therewith. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



57 



(d) Liabilities. 
The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $1,487.46, and 
there are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


McBride & Co., 


Contract 283, Stillwater Improvement, 
Wachusett Reservoir. 


$778 09 i 




Contract 308, Northern High-service Pipe 
Lines, Distribution System. 


2,196 14 


Chas. J. Jacobs Company 


Contract 310, Weston Aqueduct Supply 
Mains, Distribution System. 


3,702 13 


Florence Iron Works 


Contract 305, cast-iron water pipes, Dis- 
tribution System. 


6,787 56 


Standard Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry 


Contract 306, special castings, Distribu- 


599 25 


. Company. 


tion System. 




U. S. Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Com- 


Contract 302, cast-iron water pipes, Dis- 


10,399 94 


pany. 


tribution System. 





1 Held pending settlement of claims on account of this contract. 

A claim of the town of Boylston for land taken has been settled 
for the sum of $800 but the papers in settlement have not yet been 
executed. 

It is impossible to state the amounts due on the claims of the 
following for land damages, for water rights taken and for damages 
to established business, as no sums have been agreed upon, and suits 
are now pending in court for the determination of most of them : — 

Patrick Bradley, Henry F. Keyes, James E. Welch, Byron D. 
Allen, J. Frank Wood et at., Asa Knight, Edward F. Merriam, San- 
ford C. Kendall, estate of William H. Vickery, James H. and Han- 
nah S. Wood, Francis W. M. Goodale, Nellie M. Kirby, Boston & 
Albany Railroad Company, heirs" of Willard Morse. 



VII. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The North Metropolitan System provides for the area situated 
in the Mystic Eiver valley and for the larger part of the Charles 
Eiver valley which lies north of the Charles Eiver. The district 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

provided for embraces the cities of Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Somerville and Woburn, parts of the 
city of Boston, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Stoneham, 
Winchester and Winthrop, which were included in the original 
North Metropolitan District established under the Act of the year 
1889. Under subsequent acts the district has been extended by 
the inclusion of the towns of Wakefield and Revere and a part of 
the town of Lexington, and now embraces 9 cities and 8 towns. The 
district has an area of 90.50 square miles. It has an estimated 
population as of December 31, 1909, based upon the census of 1905, 
of 515,397; and it is estimated that of this number, 445,637, or 
86.5 per cent., contribute sewage to the North Metropolitan System. 
The South Metropolitan System provides for the areas situated 
in that part of the Charles River valley lying south of the Charles 
River, a small portion of the valley north of the Charles River and 
also a portion of the Neponset River valley. The district includes 
what was originally established by the Act of the year 1889 as the 
Charles River Valley System, for the cities of Newton, Waltham 
and a part of the city of Boston, and the towns of Brookline and 
Watertown. It also includes the towns of Hyde Park and Milton 
and a part of the town of Dedham, which were embraced in the 
Neponset River Valley System established under the Act of 1895. 
The two systems were united under the name of the South Metro- 
politan System by the Act of the year 1899, providing for the High- 
level Sewer, which extended the system to the city of Quincy. 
There are now 4 cities and 5 towns included within the district, 
which has an area of 100.87 square miles. It has an estimated pop- 
ulation, as of December 31, 1909, of 358,180, of which number it 
is estimated that 233,025, or 65.1 per cent., contribute sewage to 
the South Metropolitan System. 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

(a) Deer Island Pumping Station Extension. 
The extension of the Deer Island pumping station which was au- 
thorized by the Legislature of the year 1908, and for which an 
appropriation of $195,000 was made, has been in progress during 
the year. The foundations for the building enlargement had already 
been built by day labor and a contract was made early in the season 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 59 

for the building of the superstructure under which the work has 
been completed. The grounds about the extension have been graded 
and foundations for the additional engine and boilers have been built, 
this work having been performed by day labor. 

Under a contract which had been made with the Allis-Chalmers 
Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for furnishing a 100,000,000- 
gallon engine and centrifugal pump with boilers, various castings 
for the pump and engine have been delivered, the boilers have been 
put in place and the work has been nearly completed. It is ex- 
pected that the engine will be in regular service by the middle of 
the year. 

(b) East Boston Pumping Station Extension. 
Although the Board had been authorized by the Legislature of 
1908 to enlarge the East Boston pumping station and provide for its 
equipment, for which an appropriation of $250,000 was made, after 
the occurrence of the Chelsea fire on April 12 of that year it had 
been deemed advisable to enter upon a careful investigation as to the 
future requirements of the North Metropolitan System before pro- 
ceeding to rebuild permanently on the site at East Boston. It was 
subsequently determined to go on with the enlargement. The build- 
ings had been temporarily repaired under a special appropriation 
made by the Legislature. In August of the past year, however, a 
contract was made for permanently repairing the injuries which 
had been done to the existing building, to make the extensions of the 
engine and boiler houses, and to build the new coal house, as had 
been originally proposed. The station, after the repairs and enlarge- 
ment have been completed, will be, so far as possible, fire proof, and 
the extensions will be made in harmony with the old building. The 
new station will have a length of 268 feet and a width of 65 feet. It 
will provide for the storage of 1,500 tons of coal, and will contain 
a dynamo room and machine shop. Provision is made for the in- 
stallation of a fourth centrifugal pumping engine of 100,000,000 
gallons' capacity, with six new boilers. A portion of the masonry 
foundation for the extension has already been laid. A contract has 
been made with the Allis-Chalmers Company of Milwaukee for the 
new engine, which is to be similar in kind to that provided for the 
Deer Island station. Much of the work required in connection with 
the contracts has been carried on by day labor. 



60 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(c) Stable and Locker Buildings. 

The Board was authorized by a special Act of the year 1908 to 
use the money received from the sale of its land in East Boston for 
the purchase of other land and the erection of stable and locker 
buildings thereon. The Board has accordingly in the past month 
made an agreement for the purchase of a lot of land containing 8,715 
square feet, with the flats appurtenant, situated on the easterly side 
of Chelsea Street and adjoining the Chelsea Creek. This lot is 
separated from the pumping station by the tracks of the Grand Junc- 
tion Railroad. The Board will in the coming year enter upon the 
construction of the necessary buildings. 

There will also be used for storage purposes in connection with 
the new premises a lot on the opposite side of the creek in Chelsea, 
which belongs to the Commonwealth and which has been gradually 
filled with material dumped from the pumping station. 

(2) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The work of extending the High-level Sewer from the corner of 
Centre and Perkins streets in Jamaica Plain, through West Roxbury 
and Brookline and to Oak Square in Brighton, which has been in 
progress between two and three years, was completed in the earlier 
part of the past year. The entire length of the extension is 5.64 
miles. Some of the work involved unusual difficulties, especially 
that portion of it which was in the vicinity of Jamaica Pond, where 
the means adopted through the process of compressed air were suc- 
cessful in preventing any injurious results. The work also included 
a good deal of rock excavation and the exercise of special care in 
order to prevent a disturbance of the residential district through 
which it was carried. The entire sewer has been satisfactorily com- 
pleted, at an expense to the present date of $1,081,345.06. There 
are a few small bills to be paid, but there will be a considerable bal- 
ance remaining out of the appropriation of $1,175,000. The larger 
balance is due to the success of the methods which were adopted, 
which involved more than the usual amount of risk and uncertainty. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



61 



(3) Acquisition of Land. 

There have heen during the year but two takings of land or ease- 
ments for the Metropolitan Sewerage Works. Both of the parcels 
were in the North Metropolitan District. One of these takings was 
made for the extension of the East Boston pumping station within 
Addison Street in East Boston. The other was of land in Cambridge 
and Arlington, made on account of the change in the sewer at Alewife 
Brook, necessitated by the improvements of the channel of the brook 
by the Metropolitan Park Commission. 

List of Takings for Metropolitan Sewerage Works for the Year 1909. 



No. 


Location and Description. 


Former Owner. 


Re- 
corded. 


Purpose of Taking. 


22 


East Boston, — a 6-foot strip within 
Addison Street, adjoining prior sew- 
erage takings in 1892 and 1895. Area, 
fee in 426.2 square feet. Also rights of 
way in Addison Street and Boston & 
Albany Railroad location. 


Trustees of the 
Equity Asso- 
ciation. 


1909. 

June 28. 


Rebuilding East Boston 
pumping station. 


23 


Cambridge and Arlington, — on Ale- 
wife Brook and adjoining sewerage 
taking of January 7, 1893. Area, 
easements in 0.038 of an acre. 


Boston & Maine 
Railroad. 


Nov. 17. 


Improvement of Alewife 
Brook valley. 



(4) North Metropolitan System — Maintenance. 

The main sewers operated in the North Metropolitan System have, 
the same as in the preceding year, a length of 58.57 miles. The con- 
nections from local sewers have been increased during the year by 1 
public and 13 special connections, in all 13.06 miles in length. The 
local sewers connected with the North Metropolitan System are now 
652.56 miles in length, and the number of these connections, public 
and special, has increased from 672 to 686. 

The East Boston and Charlestown districts of Boston and the 
cities of Everett, Cambridge, Somerville and Chelsea still maintain 
both separate and combined sewers, but all of the other municipali- 
ties in the North Metropolitan System maintain separate sewers, ad- 
mitting sewage, but not directly admitting any rain water. 

There have been operated for the conveyance of the sewage of the 
North Metropolitan System four pumping stations, the Alewife 
Brook, Charlestown, East Boston and Deer Island pumping stations. 



62 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

In the disposal of the sewage, all of the sewage is pumped once, the 
most of it twice, and a portion of it is pumped the third time, before 
it is finally disposed of in the harbor. 

There have been pumped at the Alewife Brook pumping station 
3,358,000 gallons of sewage per day, with an average lift of 12.74 
feet, at a cost of $0,527 per million gallons per foot lifted; at the 
Charlestown station 32,100,000 gallons per day, 8.12 feet lift, at a 
cost of $0,177 per million gallons per foot lifted; at the East Boston 
station 58,600,000 gallons per day, 15.62 feet lift, at a cost of 
$0,089 per million gallons per foot lifted; and at the Deer Island 
station 60,600,000 gallons per day, 10.56 feet lift, at a cost of 
$0,103 per million gallons per foot lifted. Taking all of the stations 
the average cost per million gallons per foot lifted has been $0,116. 

The average amount of sewage discharged daily into the harbor 
from the outfall off Deer Island was 60,600,000 gallons. The max- 
imum daily rate of discharge for the year was reached on November 
25, when it was for a short period about 139,500,000 gallons. The 
amount of sewage in the District averaged 135.98 gallons per day 
for each person, taking the estimated population of the district con- 
tributing sewage. The fact that a portion of the sewers in the Dis- 
trict are combined sewers, directly admitting in part rain water, 
considerably increases the per capita amount. 

Bituminous coal only is used at the pumping stations, and the 
total amount which was purchased for use at the various stations 
was 6,628.625 gross tons. The average price per gross ton varied 
from $3.69 to $4.44. 

The amount of sewage pumped has slightly increased over the 
amount of the preceding year, but the amount was, with the increased 
population, below the normal on account of the favorable seasons. 

The cost of maintenance of the North Metropolitan System during 
the past year was $141,387.71. This is slightly less than the cost 
of maintenance during the preceding year. There was charged to 
the maintenance account in addition to this sum, $4,675, which was 
paid out under the special appropriation for the renewal of the East 
Boston pumping station which was partially burned in the Chelsea 
fire. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 63 

(a) Shirley Gut Siphon. 
Largely on account of the dredging in the harbor in the vicinity 
of Shirley Gut, a considerable portion of the siphon through which 
the sewage is conveyed under the bed of the harbor from Point 
Shirley to Deer Island was uncovered. During the year there has 
been heavy riprap placed along the line of the siphon in order to 
defend it against further moving of the material and possible injury 
to the pipe. 

(b) Siphon under Alewife Brook. 
The work of the Metropolitan Park Commission in moving the 
channel of Alewife Brook near the Alewife Brook pumping station 
has caused considerable changes to be made, and the channel has 
been carried to a greater distance from the station. It has also been 
found necessary, in order to conform to the deepening of the channel 
of the brook, to introduce a siphon into the branch of the metropolitan 
sewer leading across the brook to Arlington. Two siphon pipes have 
been carried in the bed of the channel in substitution of the main 
pipe for a length of 54 feet. The local Arlington sewer was x also 
affected and various changes were required. All the changes now 
in progress are made by the Board, but it is understood that the ex- 
pense is to be paid by the Metropolitan Park Commission. 

(c) Changes caused by the Cambridge Subway. 
The plans for the subway being built by the Boston Elevated Rail- 
way Company through Main Street in the city of Cambridge inter- 
fere with the Metropolitan Sewer where it crosses the line of the 
subway at Portland Street, the bottom of the sewer being 6 feet above 
the bottom of the subway. It is therefore necessary to carry the 
sewage under the subway by means of two siphon pipes. The work 
involves many complications and is performed by the Railway Com- 
pany. The introduction of siphons in the line of sewers will not 
only involve a large additional cost in the maintenance of the sewer, 
but results in a substantial reduction in its carrying capacity. The 
construction of the subway involves still further interference with 
the sewer, and the Board has notified the Company of a claim for 
damages by reason of the largely increased expense resulting to the 
Sewerage District. 



64 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(d) Winchester and Woburn Sewers. 

The condition of the branch of the North Metropolitan Sewer 
which receives the sewage of the city of Woburn and the town of 
Winchester has been such as to cause considerable trouble and com- 
plaint. The increasing population and at the same time the apparent 
reduction of the capacity of the sewer have rendered it at certain 
periods of heavy rain incapable of disposing of the sewage, and conse- 
quently there were short periods during a few days in the early spring 
when slight overflows occurred. 

Careful investigations have been made during the past year of the 
capacity of this system, and it is believed that the troubles which have 
arisen have largely been caused by the improper discharge of tan 
bark, hair and other objectionable substances from the tanneries into 
the sewer. When permission was given to connect the tanneries with 
the Metropolitan Sewer it was on the distinct condition that all such 
matter should be excluded. These substances being admitted clog the 
sewer and consequently obstruct the flow of sewage, and in fact dimin- 
ish the capacity of the sewer. The attention of the authorities of the 
two municipalities has been called to the condition, and demands 
have been made that proper works should be introduced, through 
settling tanks or otherwise, by which the objectionable matter shall 
be disposed of, and that only proper matter shall be allowed to enter 
the Metropolitan Sewer. 

The officials of the town of Winchester have caused measures to 
be taken which will apparently remove the difficulty, but so far the 
authorities of the city of Woburn have not complied with the re- 
quirements of the Board. It is the opinion of the expert advisers of 
the Board that if only proper matter is allowed to enter the sewer, 
the present system will be sufficient for a long period to come prop- 
erly to dispose of the sewage of this district. 

(5) South Metropolitan System — Maintenance. 

There are operated in the South Metropolitan System main sewers 
of a length of 43.42 miles, an increase of 0.64 of a mile during the 
year. The connections from local sewers have been increased dur- 
ing the year by 18 public connections and 1 special connection, in all, 
31.15 miles in length. The local sewers connected with the South 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 65 

Metropolitan System are now 524.01 miles in length, and the num- 
ber of these connections has increased from 117 to 136. 

The Back Bay, Roxbury, West Roxbury, Brighton and Dorchester 
districts of Boston and the towns of Brookline and Milton still main- 
tain both separate and combined sewers, but all the other districts 
contributory to this system maintain separate sewers. 

There are two pumping stations operated in the South Metropolitan 
System. The Ward Street pumping station elevates into the High- 
level Sewer the sewage from the original Charles River valley sewer 
and also that which is contributed from a portion of the city of Bos- 
ton. The sewage from the city of Quincy is also pumped into the 
High-level Sewer from the Quincy pumping station. Although the 
sewage is carried by gravity to the outfall pipes in the harbor, a 
screen-house is maintained at Nut Island for the purpose of removing 
the more objectionable matter contained in the sewage before it is 
finally discharged from the outfall. 

There has been pumped at the Ward Street station an average of 
22,700,000 gallons of sewage per day, with an average lift of 40.57 
feet, at a cost of $0,077 per million gallons per foot lifted; and at 
the Quincy station 4,163,000 gallons, 21.17 feet lift, at an average 
cost of $0,208 per million gallons per foot lifted. From all the 
stations the average cost per million gallons per foot lifted has been 
$0,089. 

An average of 40,400,000 gallons of sewage has been discharged 
daily from the outfalls into the outer harbor. The maximum rate 
of discharge per day, which was 135,500,000 gallons, was reached on 
February 20. 

The average discharge of sewage in the South Metropolitan Sys- 
tem was at the rate of 173.37 gallons per day per person of the 
estimated number contributing sewage in the District. This larger 
per capita discharge is in part because, on account of its greater size, 
more storm water is admitted into the High-level Sewer at periods 
of heavy rainfall. 

The total amount of coal, all of which is bituminous, which was 
purchased for use at the stations, was 2,373.303 gross tons. The 
contract price per gross ton varied from $3.97 to $4.33. 

There has been considerable increase in the number of gallons 
of sewage discharged into the harbor, largely owing to the additional 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

population contributing sewage to the system. Some decrease in 
the cost of sewage disposal is due largely to a decrease in the cost 
of coal. 

All the sewage of the South Metropolitan System is now disposed 
of through the outfall pipes off Nut Island, with the exception of that 
from a small area in the districts of Dorchester and Milton, which is 
so low that its sewage cannot be carried into the High-level Sewer ex- 
cept by pumping. The sewage of this area consequently is disposed 
of by the city of Boston through its Main Drainage Works, and for 
this service a rental is paid to the city. 

The expenditures for maintenance of the South Metropolitan Sys- 
tem for the past year were $97,279.56, which is also a very slight 
decrease from the total amount expended during the preceding year. 

(a) High-level Seiver Extension. 
The High-level Sewer extension was put into operation in the early 
part of the year and has since been in regular service. The exten- 
sion of this sewer to the higher parts of the town of Brookline has 
caused many connections to be made for the 1,850 acres of territory 
in that town which have become contributory to the sewer. 

(b) Outfalls of High-level Sewer. 
A careful examination has been made of the two 60-inch outfall 
pipes through which the sewage of the South Metropolitan System is 
emptied into the harbor. They were entered by a diver for a con- 
siderable distance, and the pipes were found clean and the outfalls 
were shown in every respect to be in a satisfactory condition, although 
they have now been in use for a period of five years. 



VIII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disburse- 
ments, assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with the 
thirtieth day of November, 1909, was, as stated in connection with 
the Water Works, presented to the General Court in January, in 
accordance with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 67 

year 1906, and a copy of this financial abstract is in part printed 
as Appendix No. 7. 

The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1909, is 
herewith presented, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of 
1906, as a part of the annual report of the Board. 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Loans authorized for the construction 
of the Sewerage Works of the North Metropolitan System have 
amounted to $6,573,865.73, to which are added receipts from vari- 
ous sources amounting to $46,307.18. The amount of expenditures 
approved by the Board for payment for the year 1909 was $140,- 
965.49, and the total amount of expenditures approved to January 
1, 1910, was $6,312,130.61. The balance remaining on January 1, 
1910, was $308,042.30. 

The loans authorized for the construction of the various parts of 
the South Metropolitan System have amounted to $8,867,046.27. 
The receipts applicable to the loan fund have been $11,406.82. The 
amount of expenditures approved for payment in the year 1909 was 
$43,428.60. The total amount of expenditures approved for payment 
from the beginning of the works has been $8,785,297.80. The bal- 
ance remaining for the South Metropolitan System on January 1, 
1910, was $93,155.29. 

The bonds issued on account of the loans have been for varying 
periods, not exceeding forty years, and bear interest at the rate of 
3 per cent, and 3% per cent. The premiums received on account of 
the sale of bonds for the North Metropolitan System have amounted 
to $179,106.65, and those received on account of the South Metro- 
politan System have amounted to $410,132.03. 

The increase in the debt during the calendar year, as represented 
by the Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, was $300,000. The increase 
of the sinking fund for the payment of the debt at maturity was, 
during the same period, $180,742.30. There has consequently been 
an increase in the net debt during the calendar year amounting to 
$119,257.70. 

The amount expended for maintenance of the North Metropolitan 
System in the year 1909 was $146,062.71, and for the South Metro- 
politan System $97,279.56, a total for both systems of $243,342.27. 

The assessments made to meet interest, sinking fund requirements 



68 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and maintenance and operation of the North Metropolitan System 
amounted in the year 1909 to $401,660.84, and the assessments for 
the South Metropolitan System amounted to $457,371.71. 

The following is a detailed financial statement regarding the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Works : — 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 

The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, and the expenditures for construction, have been as fol- 
lows : — 

(a) North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, including those for 
the Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions and North 
System enlargement and extension, ..... $6,573,865 73 
Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous 
sources, which are placed to the credit of the North Metro- 
politan System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1909, . $10,423 97 
For the period prior to January 1, 1909, . 35,883 21 

46,307 18 



$6,620,172 91 



Amount approved for payment by the Board 1 out of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System : — 
For the year ending December 31, 1909, . $140,965 49 
For the period prior to January 1, 1909, . 6,171,165 12 



6,312,130 61 



Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 

1910, $308,042 30 



1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 69 



(b) South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, applied to the con- 
struction of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset valley 
sewer, High-level sewer and extension, .... $8,867 ; 046 27 

Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and from miscel- 
laneous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South 
Metropolitan System : — 

For the year ending December 31, 1909, .... - 

For the period prior to January 1, 1909, .... 11,406 82 



$8,878,453 09 
Amount approved by the Board 1 for payment out of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System : — 
On account of the Charles River valley 

sewer, $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,531 46 
On account of the High-level sewer and 
extension : — 
For the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1909, . $43,428 60 
For the period prior to 

January 1, 1909, . 7,030,291 47 

7,073,720 07 

8,785,297 80 



Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1910, . $93,155 29 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Bonds. 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority of the 
successive statutes, has from time to time issued bonds designated 
" Metropolitan Sewerage Loan," as follows : — 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



70 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Metropolitan Sewer Loans, North System. 
Bonds issued. 





Date of Sale. 


Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 


Rate of 
Interest 

(Per 
Cent.). 


Price 
received. 


Date due. 


Premium. 


Apr. 2, 


1890, 


$500,000 


3 


102.40 


Jan. 1, 1930 


$12,000 00 


Apr. 2, 


1890, 










500,000 


3 


103.02 


Jan. 1, 1930 


15,100 00 


Apr. 2, 


1890, 










500,000 


3 


103.62 


Jan. 1, 1930 


18,100 00 


Apr. 2, 


1890, 










500,000 


3 


102.327 


Jan. 1, 1930 


11,635 00 


Apr., 


1890, 










200,000 


3 


103. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


6,000 00 


Feb., 


1891, 










50,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


1 


Mar., 


1891, 










300,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


35,130 30 1 


Mar., 


1891, 










18,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


J 


Jan., 


1892, 










35,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Feb., 


1892, 










29,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Mar., 


1892, 










50,000 


3 


101. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


500 00 


June, 


1892, 










436,000 


3 


101.50 


Jan. 1, 1930 


1 


July, 


1892, 










150,000 


3 


101.50 


Jan. 1, 1930 


11,060 00 1 


Aug., 


1892, 










150,000 


3 


101.50 


Jan. 1, 1930 


J 


Nov., 


1892, 










3,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1, 1930 


15 00 


Nov., 


1892, 










200,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Jan., 


1893, 










35,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1, 1930 


175 00 


Jan., 


1893, 










25,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1, 1930 


125 00 


Feb., 


1893, 










20,000 


3 


101. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


200 00 


Feb., 


1893, 










5,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1, 1930 


25 00 


Feb., 


1893, 










400,000 


3 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 1930 


1,000 00 


Mar., 


1893, 










94,000 


3 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 1930 


235 00 


May 1, 


1894, 










464,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Oct., 


1894, 










4,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Oct., 


1894, 










1,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Nov., 


1894, 










15,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Nov., 


1894, 










10,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Dec, 


1894, 










6,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Apr., 


1895, 










300,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


Dec, 


L896, 










30,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


- 


June, 


1897, 










70,000 


3H 


106.243 


Jan. 1, 1930 


5,084 80 1 


June, 


1897, 










10,000 


m 


106.243 


Jan. 1, 1930 


Apr., 


1898, 










5,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


1 


June, 


1898, 










155,000 


W<L 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


22,843 751 


June, 


898, 










60,000 


VA 


100. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


J 


Apr., 


900, 










265,000 


3 


103.948 


Jan. 1, 1930 


10,462 20 


May, ] 


903, 










200,000 


3H 


104.9797 


Jan. 1, 1930 


9,959 40 


May, 


903, 










50,000 


3M 


106.2424 


Jan. 1, 1943 


3,121 20 


July, 1 


903, 










250,000 


3H 


104.419 


July 1, 1943 


11,047 50 


June, ] 


906, 










55,000 


3H 


103.09 


July 1, 1943 


1,699 50 


Mar. 1 


909, 










300,000 


3H 


101.196 


Jan. 1, 1949 


3,588 00 






$6,450,000 


$179,106 65 





1 Readjustment of Treasurer. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



71 



Metropolitan Sewer Loans, South System. 
Bonds issued. 



Date of Sale. 


Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 


Rate of 
Interest 

(Per 
Cent.). 


Price 

received. 


Date due. 


Premium. 


Apr., 


1890, . . . 


$100,000 


3 


103. 


Jan. 1, 1930 


$3,000 00 


Apr., ] 


890, . 












400,000 


3 


103. 


Jan. 1 


1930 


12,000 00 


May, ] 


890, . 












300,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1 


1930 


12,000 00 


Aug., 1 


1895, . 












300,000 


3 


100.585 


Mar. 1 


1935 


1,755 00 


Feb., 1 


896, . 












50,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


1935 


- 


Dec, ] 


896, . 












135,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


1935 


- 


Dec, ] 


896, . 












15,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


1935 


- 


June, ] 


907, . 












300,000 


m 


106.98 


Mar. 1 


1935 


20,940 00 


June, ] 


898, . 












35,000 


3H 


100. 


Mar. 1 


1935 


4,088 00 » 


June, ] 


899, . 












25,000 


3 


100.64 


Mar. 1 


1936 


160 00 


June, 1 


899, . 












1,000,000 


3 


100.64 


July 1 


1939 


6,400 00 


Sept., 1 


900, . 












10,000 


3 


100.79 


July 1 


1939 


79 00 


Sept., ] 


900, . 












912 


3 


100. 


July 1 


1939 


- 


Apr., ] 


901, . 












40,000 


3 


100.915 


Mar. 1 


1936 


366 00 


Sept., ] 


1901, . 












2,000,000 


m 


106.71 


July 1 


1940 


134,200 00 


Sept., ] 


L902, . 












14,000 


3 


100. 


July 1 


, 1939 


- 


Sept., ] 


1902, . 












500,000 


3^2 


107.243 


July 1 


1940 


36,215 00 


Sept., 


1902, . 












150,000 


3M 


107.2395 


July 1 


1940 


10,859 25 


Dec, ] 


1902, . 












200,000 


W* 


107.79 


July 1 


1940 


15,580 00 


Feb., ] 


1903, . 












100,000 


3H 


108.25 


July 1 


1940 


8,230 56 * 


Apr., 


[903, . 












100,000 


VA 


106.75 


July 1 


1940 


6,750 00 


Apr., 


1903, . 












175,000 


3H 


106.75 


July 1 


1940 


11,812 50 


Apr., ] 


1903, . 












203,000 


IVl 


106.75 


July 1 


1940 


13,702 50 


Apr., ] 


1903, . 












25,000 


3H 


106.494 


July 1 


1940 


1,623 50 


Apr., 


[903, . 












133,000 


3H 


105.9364 


July 1 


1940 


7,895 42 


May, 


1903, . 












996,000 


3M 


106.2424 


Jan. 1 


1943 


62,174 31 


May, 


1903, . 












4,000 


3K 


105.5453 


Mar. 1 


1935 


221 81 


July, 


1904, . 












392,000 


3H 


104.929 


July 1 


1944 


19,321 68 


June, 


1906, . 












154,000 


3^ 


103.09 


Jan. 1 


1946 


4,758 60 


June, 


1906, . 












21,000 


3M 


103.09 2 


Jan. 1 


1946 


648 90 


Apr., 


1907, . 












300,000 


3H 


101.85 


Jan. 1 


1947 


5,550 00 


Apr., 


1908, . 












700,000 


3H 


101.40 


Jan. 1 


1946 


9,800 00 
















$8,877,912 






$410,132 03 



1 Readjustment of Treasurer. 



2 Not issued or delivered until 1907. 



(3) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Eund. 

Under the authority of chapter 122 of the Acts of the year 1899, 
the Treasurer and Receiver-General of the Commonwealth was re- 
quired to consolidate the sinking funds of all the Metropolitan Sewer- 



72 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



age Loans into one fund, to be known as the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Loans Sinking Fund. 

The Board received, during the year, from rentals and from other 
sources, to be applied to the sinking fund, $169.38. 

The sinking fund established has amounted at the end of each 
year to sums as follows : — 



December 
December 
December 
December 
December 
December 



31, 1899, 
31, 1900, 
31, 1901, 
31, 1902, 
31, 1903, 
31, 1904, 



$361,416 59 


454,520 57 


545,668 26 


636,084 04 


754,690 41 


878,557 12 



December 31, 1905, 

December 31, 1906, 

December 31, 1907, 

December 31, 1908, 

December 31, 1909, 



$1,008,724 95 
1,146,998 68 
1,306,850 30 
1,492,418 98 
1,673,784 40 



(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1909, have been as fol- 
lows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriation under chapter 104 of the Acts of 1909, . . $146,900 00 
Balance of appropriation under chapter 582 of the Acts of 

1908, 17,284 43 * 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, . . . 1,525 72 



Amount approved by the Board for payment, . 
Balance January 1, 1910, .... 



$165,710 15 
146,062 71 

$19,647 44 



South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriation under chapter 105 of the Acts of 1909, 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, 



Amount approved by the Board for payment, . 



Balance January 1, 1910, 



$105,700 00 
222 99 

$105,922 99 
97,279 56 

$8,643 43 



1 Of this balance, $12,609.43 is the remaining portion of the special appropriation of $40,000 made by 
chapter 582 of the Acts of 1908 for the restoration and equipment of the East Boston pumping station, on 
account of the Chelsea fire of April 12, 1908. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



73 



(5) Annual Assessments. 

Assessments for the year, amounting to $401,660.84, for the North 
Metropolitan System and to $457,371.71 for the South Metropolitan 
System, were required for the payment of interest and sinking fund 
requirements and the cost of maintenance and operation of works. 
The requirements for the North Metropolitan System were: for 
interest, $199,626.75; for the sinking fund, $57,121.81; and for 
maintenance, $144,912.28. For the South Metropolitan System the 
requirements were: for interest, $301,688.47; for the sinking fund, 
$57,091.01; and for maintenance, $98,592.23. The assessments for 
the North Metropolitan System were made upon the cities and towns 
in the District in accordance with chapter 369 of the Acts of the year 
1906, and the assessments for the South Metropolitan System were 
made in accordance with ratios fixed by the Apportionment Commis- 
sioners appointed under the provisions of chapter 424 of the Acts of 
the year 1899. The respective assessments were as follows: — 







Nor 


th Metropolitan Sewerage System. 




Arlington, 


$9,169 53 


Revere, 


. $11,252 34 


Belmont, 






4,927 67 


Somerville, . 


56,184 31 


Boston, 






69,561 33 


Stoneham, 


. . . 4,766 06 


Cambridge, . 






92,920 56 


Wakefield, 


8,125 52 


Chelsea, 






26,387 53 


Winchester, . 


9,453 68 


Everett, 






22,211 69 


Winthrop, . . 


7,704 96 


Lexington, 






3,378 52 


Woburn, 


10,556 11 


Maiden 






32 524 60 






Medford, 






18,968 48 


Total, . 


. $401,660 84 


Melrose, 






13,567 95 






South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 




Boston, . . . $189,305 15 


Quiney, 


. $27,329 62 


Brookline, 






85,583 96 


Waltham, 


26,741 33 


Dedham, 






11,208 87 


Watertown, . 


13,537 62 


Hyde Park, 
Milton, , 






14 539 42 










• - L TC ^ t^J »_7 »_/ ^I_j 

21,888 20 


Total, . 


. $457,371 71 


Newton, 






67,237 54 







(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the va- 
rious operations for the different works : — 



74 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Construction and Acquisition of 
Works. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1909. 


North Metropolitan System. 










Original system, main line and branches, 




- 


$5,383,957 67 


Lexington branch, 




- 




68,585 15 






- 




54,877 12 






- 




35,698 29 


Stoneham branch, 




- 




11,574 10 


Revere extension, 




- 




215,722 79 


Chelsea and Everett outlets, .... 




- 




71,216 41 


Wakefield branch extension, 




- 




190,081 97 


Belmont extension, 




- 




57,363 06 


Maiden extension: — 












- 




$3,610 46 




Section 64, ....... 


$12,743 58 




58,792 27 




Land takings, purchase and recording, 


- 




4,689 90 








$12,743 58 




67,092 63 








Bulkhead, Chelsea Creek, 




- 




3,231 00 


Stable and locker, East Boston, .... 




10 00 




81 15 


North System, enlargement: — 










Administration, 


$5,136 86 




$5,798 52 




Deer Island pumping station, extensions and 










additions, 


97,937 39 




120,399 73 




East Boston pumping station, extensions and 










additions, ....... 


25,129 66 




26,443 02 




Real estate: — 










Legal, conveyancing and expert, 


8 00 


128,211 91 


8 00 


152,649 27 






i 


Total for North Metropolitan System, . 


$140,965 49 


56,312,130 61 


South Metropolitan System. 










Charles River valley sewer, main line, 


- 






$800,046 27 


Neponset River valley sewer: — 












- 




$866,595 66 




Brookline branch, 


- 




44,935 80 


911,531 46 


High-level Sewer: — 








Administration, 


- 




$51,621 43 




Apportionment commission, .... 


- 




2,000 00 




Land takings, purchase and recording, 


$2 64 




355,626 09 




Quincy force main, 


- 




18,351 71 




Quincy pumping station, 


- 




11,705 68 




Section 43, Quincy, 


- 




411,749 22 




Section 44, Quincy, 


- 




299,543 47 




Section 45, Quincy, 


- 




76,139 36 




Section 46, Quincy, 


- 




62,551 26 




Section 47, Quincy, 


- 




109,786 58 




Section 48, Quincy, 


- 




295,319 29 




Sections 48 and 49, embankments, Quincy, 


- 




81,548 64 




Section 49, Quincy, . . • . 


- 




169,020 18 




Section 50, Quincy 


- 




109,570 35 




Section 51, Quincy, 


- 




87,203 68 




Section 52, Quincy, 


- 




155,800 65 




Amounts carried forward, .... 


$2 64 


$2,297,537 59 $1,711,577 73 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



75 



Construction and Acquisition of 


For the Year ending 


From Beginning of Work 


Works. 


December 31, 1909. 


to December 31, 1909. 


Amounts brought forward, .... 


$2 64 


$2,297,537 59 $1,711,577 73 


South Metropolitan System — Con. 






High-level Sewer — Con. 






Section 53, Quincy, 


- 


98,042 42 


Section 54, Quincy, 


- 


101,918 39 


Section 55, Milton and Quincy, 


- 


305,816 90 


Section 56, Milton, 


- 


105 736 94 


Section 57, Milton 


- 


68,783 24 


Section 58, Milton, ...... 


- 


94,089 72 


Section 59, Milton, 


- 


104,444 62 


Section 60, Milton 


- 


60,796 13 


Section 61, Milton, 


- 


129,598 76 


Section 62, Milton, 


- 


129,612 28 


Section 63, Milton, 


- 


127,142 45 


Section 64, Neponset River crossing, 


- 


47,554 40 


Section 65, Hyde Park, 


- 


41,333 37 


Section 66, Hyde Park, . . ... 


- 


253,902 72 


Section 67, Hyde Park, Stony Brook crossing, . 


- 


32,298 33 


Section 68, Hyde Park and Roxbury, 


- 


78,493 62 


Section 69, West Roxbury, .... 


- 


102,143 68 


Section 70, West Roxbury, .... 


- 


131,375 55 


Section 71, West Roxbury, .... 


- 


91,888 22 


Section 72, West Roxbury, .... 


- 


127,956 76 


Section 73, West Roxbury, . . . . 


- 


494,290 42 


Section 74, West Roxbury and Roxbury, . 


- 


147,296 69 


Section 75, Roxbury, 


- 


137,192 99 


Section 76, Roxbury, cast-iron force main, 


- 


80,342 26 


Section 77, Roxbury, Ward Street pumping 






station, 


- 


560,288 31 


Section 78, Roxbury, connecting sewer, 


- 


35,994 69 


Reversion of grade, Huntington Avenue, 


- 


6,503 56 




?° fil 


C QQO 07c A1 


High-level Sewer extension: — 


$4 04 


o,yyz,i>/o ui 


Charles River valley studies, .... 


- 


$3,893 71 


Administration, 


$2,106 09 


14,935 85 


Section 80, day work, West Roxbury and Brook- 






line, 


12 00 


294,973 91 


Section 81, Brookline, 


6,679 28 


129,364 35 


Section 82, Brookline, 


224 71 


136,152 02 


Section 82, day work, Park street crossing, 


- 


2,030 18 


Section 83, Brookline, 


- 


93,818 87 


Section 84, Brookline and Brighton, . 


- 


47,592 89 


Section 85, Brighton, 


20,848 46 


226,855 70 


Section 85, day work, Brighton, 


- 


66,611 62 


Section 86, Brighton, . . . . 


13,550 42 


57,189 88 


Land takings, purchase and recording, 


5 00 

40 ACU? Oft 


7,926 08 

1 H81 QA£ (\R 




*±o,t:«o yo 


l,Uol,o40 UO 


Total for South Metropolitan System, . 


143,428 60 


$8,785,297 80 


Total for construction for both systems, 


. $184,394 09 


$15,097,428 41 



76 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance. 


For the Year 

ending 

December 31, 1909. 


From Beginning 

of Work to 

December 31, 1909. 




$146,062 71 
97,279 56 


$1,575,822 10 
1,309,285 30 


Total for maintenance, both systems, .... 


$243,342 27 


$2,885,107 40 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, 
receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 
1909: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, ........... 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Traveling, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Engineering: — 
Chief engineer, . . . 
Engineering assistants, ....... 

Inspectors, ......... 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 
Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 
Engineering and drafting supplies, .... 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes ■ . 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Amount carried forward, 



$2,333 33 

375 00 

1,646 67 

35 00 
343 81 
244 80 
121 28 

36 97 



$1,666 67 

10,486 48 

4,778 71 

273 03 

185 71 

1 00 

59 50 

777 66 

363 85 

1,628 77 



$5,136 86 



20,221 38 



$25,358 24 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



77 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Amount brought forward, 



North Metropolitan System — Con. 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 

Woodbury & Leighton Co., contract 74, extension of engine, boiler, screen- 
house and coal-house at East Boston pumping station, .... 

Allis Chalmers Co., contract 68, addition to pumping plant at Deer Island 
pumping station, . . . . - 

Walter A. Wentworth Co., contract 72, extension of engine and coal-houses 
at Deer Island pumping station, ........ 

Sundry bills paid under contract 64, . . . . 

Real estate: — 

Settlements 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 



Total for North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System. 

High-level Sewer. 
Administration: — 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 



Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 
Tools and repairs of same, .... 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, 

Teaming and express, 

Land takings, purchase and recording, 



$2 64 



High-level Sewer Extension. 
Administration: — 
Commissioners, . . . . 

Secretary 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Traveling, ......... 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, ..... 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



$1,166 67 


375 00 


225 00 


155 16 


85 75 


98 51 


- 



Amounts carried forward, 



$25,358 24 



$.15,401 64 
2,559 83 
7,438 64 



25.400 11 



$8,075 00 

34,615 00 

34,755 56 
12,743 58 



$18 00 



90,189 14 



18 00 



$140,965 49 



$2 64 



$2 64 



$2,106 09 



$2,106 09 



64 



78 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Amounts brought forward, 



South Metropolitan System — Con. 

High-level Sewer Extension — Con. 
Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, $1,250 00 

Engineering assistants, 1,820 90 

911 11 



Inspectors, 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 
Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 
Engineering and drafting supplies, .... 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 
Rent and taxes, ........ 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



7 28 

37 52 
257 27 
295 54 

31 35 



Advertising, 

Labor and teaming, $1,457 04 

Tools, machinery and appliances, . . . . . . . 85 40 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, . 131 85 



Contracts: — 
Bruno & Petitti, Section 81, in part, 
Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., Section 81, in part, 
Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., Section 85, in part, 
D. F. O'Connell Co., Section 85, in part, 
Glenn & Broderick, near Section 86, . 
Chas. J. Jacobs Co., Section 86 ... . 



$4,583 82 
1,605 49 
1,446 60 

17,166 02 
1,917 43 
8,310 25 



Real estate: — 

Settlements 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 



$5 00 



Total for South Metropolitan System, .... 

Maintenance and Operation of Works. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, ......... 

Secretary and assistants, ....... 

Rent, . . . . . . 

Heating, lighting and care of building, .... 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, .... 



Amount carried forward, 



$2,106 09 $2 64 



4,610 97 



1,674 29 



35,029 61 



5 00 



43,425 96 



$43,428 60 



$2,333 33 


2,264 00 


234 97 


133 29 


30 00 


489 78 



5,485 37 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



79 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Amount brought forward, ..... 

North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Administration — Con. 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, .... 

Rent, ......... 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses, ..... 

Deer Island pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, ....... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . 
East Boston pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, . . . . . 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Charlestown pumping station: — 

Labor, ......... 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, ........ 

Repairs and renewals, . . . . 

Telephones, 

General supplies, ....... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Amounts carried forward, 



i,485 37 



26 50 

8 08 

24 38 



,676 98 
704 93 
398 93 

161 88 

185 76 

258 20 

80 31 



$14,625 26 

11,254 78 

397 81 

1,351 67 

167 93 

750 33 

217 85 

476 39 

49 07 

18,278 77 

10,874 66 

392 98 

1,703 33 

47 88 

748 29 

133 55 

677 26 

266 09 

14,303 92 

3,869 56 

273 80 

405 60 

16 05 

1,110 55 

94 50 

412 87 

41 30 



$5,544 33 



7,466 99 



$82,942 05 $13,011 32 



80 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Amounts brought forward, 



North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Alewife Brook pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, . : 

Repairs and renewals, . . . 

Telephones, 

General supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants, 

Labor, 

Automobiles, 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, .... 

Freight, express and teaming, .... 

Fuel and lighting, . . . ... 

Jobbing and repairing, ...... 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, . . . . 

Paints and oils 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Sand, gravel and stone, ..... 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, . ^ 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Horses, vehicles and stable account, ' 

Renewal East Boston pumping station, account Chelsea fire, April 12, 1908: 
Supplies and expenses, 



Total for North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners • . 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, ...... 

Miscellaneous expenses, ..... 



Amount carried forward, 



5,942 05 $13,011 32 



7,661 00 


1,291 86 


243 27 


271 44 


37 32 


344 59 


63 20 


68 16 


1,159 62 


$2,525 00 


22,848 95 


237 28 


451 70 


265 44 


10 00 


94 83 


136 05 


502 21 


211 03 


335 70 


453 82 


40 95 


16 10 


1,006 61 


613 36 


80 60 



$4,464 25 



4,675 00 



$1,166 67 


2,348 08 


234 97 


252 51 


30 00 


449 63 


23 84 


13 50 


7 67 



94,082 51 



29,829 63 



9,139 25 



$146,062 71 



$4,526 87 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



81 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



Amount brought forward, ..... 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 
General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, .... 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 



Ward Street pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, .... 

Water, 

Packing, . . ... 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Telephones, ..... 

General supplies, .... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Quincy pumping station: — 

Labor, ...... 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, .... 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Telephones 

General supplies, .... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Nut Island screen-house: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, .... 

Water, 

Packing, ..... 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Telephones, ..... 

General supplies, .... 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 
Engineering assistants, . 

Labor 

Automobiles, ..... 
Brick, cement and lime, 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 



S4.170 00 
704 93 

774 52 

40 02 

211 53 

35 00 

95 78 



818,692 84 
8,468 54 

259 11 
1,375 20 

188 12 
1,050 21 

113 25 
1,138 19 

752 67 

6,276 66 

1,342 98 

37 69 

205 55 

30 95 

64 87 

47 73 

187 29- 

279 95 

7,036 84 

1,600 83 

74 12 

292 16 

20 60 

7 70 

94 86 

386 02 

71 93 



§4,200 00 

19,569 46 

166 22 

95 00 

64 37 



1,525 87 



6,031 78 



50,096 84 



Amounts carried forward, 



§24,095 05 860,655 49 



82 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



Amounts brought forward, 



South Metropolitan System 
Sewer lines, buildings and grounds — Con. 
Freight, express and teaming, 
Fuel and lighting, ...... 

Jobbing and repairing, ..... 

Lumber, ....... 

Machinery, tools and appliances, . 

Paints and oils, 

Rubber and oiled goods, .... 
Sand, gravel and stone, .... 

Telephones, ....... 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, .... 



Con. 



City of Boston, for pumping and interest, 
Horses, vehicles and stable account, 



Total for South Metropolitan System, 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1909. 



$24,095 05 $60,655 49 



25 

118 35 

34 40 

196 35 

37 10 

166 43 

167 26 
36 00 

42 98 

409 71 

241 78 

56 51 

25,602 17 

7,700 00 
3,321 90 



$97,279 56 



(b) Receipts. 
The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows : — 



Account. 


For the Year 

ending 

December 31, 1909. 


From Beginning 

of Work to 

December 31, 1909. 


North Metropolitan System, — construction, 
South Metropolitan System, — construction, 
North Metropolitan System, — maintenance, 
South Metropolitan System, — maintenance, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 


$10,423 97 

1,525 72 
222 99 
169 38 


$46,307 18 

11,406 82 

11,559 64 

1,476 70 

1,361 20 


Totals 


$12,342 06 


$72,111 54 



(c) Assets. 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies ; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc. ; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; real estate connected with works not com- 
pleted; completed works, including real estate connected therewith. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



83 



(d) Liabilities. 

The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $748.62, and there 
are other current bills unpaid which have not yet been received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or 

until Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level Sewer: — 

National Contracting Co 

E. W. Everson & Co 

High-level Sewer Extension: — 

Timothy J. O'Connell, .... 
Geo. M. Bryne Co., .... 
Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., 

North Metropolitan Construction: — 

Allis-Chalmers Co., .... 

Woodbury & Leighton Co., . 


Sect. 73, contract abandoned, . 

Sect. 75 

Addition to pumping plant at Deer Island 
pumping station, 

Extension of engine, boiler, screen-house 
and coal house at East Boston pumping 


$5,516 171 
1,000 00 

60 00 

2,508 51 

500 00 

34,615 00 
1,425 00 




$45,624 68 



1 Damages claimed by the Commonwealth on account of the abandonment of the contract exceed 
this amount. 

Claims have been made by the following parties, but it is impos- 
sible to state the amounts due for land and other damages, as no 
sums have been agreed upon, and suits are now pending in the courts 
for the determination of most of them : — 

Anna L. Dunican, Carrie S. Urquhart, N. Jefferson Urquhart, 
Edwin N. Urquhart, Richard Jones, James Doherty, Michael Ni- 
land, William H. Gibbons, Francis Normile, George A. Goddard, 
Boston & Albany Railroad Company. 



IX. CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

There has been a gratifying decrease in the consumption of water 
in the Metropolitan District during the past year. The daily 
average quantity of water supplied from the Metropolitan Water 
Works to the District was 119,386,000 gallons, as against a daily 
average consumption of 127,301,000 gallons in the preceding year, 
a decrease in the total daily average consumption of 7,915,000 gal- 
lons, and a decrease in the daily average consumption per inhabitant 
from 134.7 gallons to 123.7 gallons. These are the quantities as 



84 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

determined at the pumping stations and by the flow through the 
Weston Aqueduct, and include also the estimated yield at Spot Pond. 
The daily average quantity of water measured by the Venturi meters 
as delivered to the various municipalities is, owing to leakages from 
the reservoirs and pipe lines, and also to some extent to the use of 
water at the pumping stations, somewhat less than the amount 
above given, the daily average quantity consumed, according to the 
latter measurement, being 119,119,100 gallons, a daily average con- 
sumption per inhabitant of 123 gallons. This reduction in the con- 
sumption of water is due in part to the absence of long-continued 
periods of cold weather during the winter, and of hot, dry weather 
during the summer, and also, to some slight extent, due to the use of 
oil in place of water for street sprinkling ; but the chief cause of the 
reduction is undoubtedly the increased use of water meters and 
greater vigilance on the part of municipal authorities. 

The decrease in the total consumption occurred in every one of 
the municipalities except the city of Everett and the towns of Wa- 
tertown and Lexington, and in every municipality except Watertown 
the daily average per capita consumption was decreased. 

The great per capita reduction which has resulted in the munici- 
palities of Melrose, Medford, Swampscott and Winthrop, where there 
has been the greatest activity in the installation of meters, shows 
conclusively the good effects which have resulted from their intro- 
duction. In fact, those cities and towns where meters have been 
more generally introduced have shown a notable comparative decrease 
in the amounts of their annual assessments, especially in comparison 
with other cities and towns where there has been much less metering 
of services. 

In the city of Boston, where 6,584 services have been equipped 
with meters during the past year, the daily average consumption has 
decreased by 4,349,400 gallons, a reduction of the daily average 
consumption per capita from 158 gallons to 149 gallons. 

The direct influence of the introduction of meters in the four 
municipalities above named is also shown in the annexed diagram, 
upon which the consumption of the year 1909, in comparison with 
that of the year 1908, is indicated. 

That a very large proportion of the water supplied to the District 
continues to be wasted is evident when it appears that the average 



diagram showing 

Average Rate of Consumption of Water 

in the Metropolitan District in 1909 





DURING THE ENTIRE DAY 






AND 




BETWEEN 


THE HOURS OF I AND 4 AT 


NI6HT 


TON 
THROP 
vlCY 
NEHAM 


^ ~JOi_QoL_ uJ f~"0 

5i;gzgju z ^ °^ ^ £ 


MPSCOTT 

DEN 

TON 


CO z — o 


^ > 2 -> uj Q ;< ^ H -* t 


^ d - 1 


o E: => H- 


:nuJ5c£>uJ Q -< aJ u< 


^ < — 


CO ^ O ^0 


o cd m -=c uj 2 !j z 2 to 5 


to 2 2 



I60r — 



150 

140 

130 

120 

es 110 
O 

k»oo 

a 
90 

g-80 
o 

70 

60 

en 

I 50 




<L> 
Q- 



C5 
ID 



40 



g* 30 



Average Rate per Capita for entire District 



Average Rate per Capita 




^V4%V»V//AViV«VAV/<V«VAV«V»V«V«V/<VAVAV..W/.V 



:•:•:«•:•: •■»:•: :♦:•:♦: :•>:•: 48% 

•:♦%:♦!♦:.%••:♦:♦:♦: •:♦:•:♦ >:♦:•:« 3050 





:♦:* 


:♦:♦> 


VAV»V»VV.V»%V#VV»%VV»V>.*WvV.V.V.V.V.V %\v..v»v. 


X**\ 

*•*♦*♦ 


&•:• 


v.-.-. 
88 


► ♦ ♦ ♦ •%• ♦ ♦ • • ♦ • 




mmm 








Percentage of Services Metered 








5.7 


17.8 


29.9 


12.8 [33.9 9.7 


36.6 50.1 9.6 33.7|33.1 31.0 100.0100.0100.0 


89.2 


96.3 


100.0 



160 

150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



o 
a 



a. 



o 
o 



u 
a) 



c: 



<L> 

O 
u 
a; 
> 



Daily Average Rate of Consumption 1909.. 

« Night - between I A.M. and 4 A.M. 1909 
Dally Average Rates of Consumption in 1908 shown in Red 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 85 

rate of consumption in the District between the hours of 1 and 4 
in the morning is 82 gallons per inhabitant, or just two-thirds of 
the average rate of consumption for the entire day, and that the 
rate of this night consumption in several of the cities and towns is 
more than one-half of that for the whole twenty-four hours. 

The greatly increased consumption of water in continuous periods 
of very cold or of very hot and dry weather shows that large amounts 
of water are drawn unnecessarily or for purposes for which munici- 
pal water supplies were never intended, and which if generally prac- 
ticed would render the supplies absolutely inadequate or of immod- 
erate cost. 

By the Act of the Legislature of last year the duty of supervising 
and promoting the enforcement of the law relative to the use and 
care of meters in the Metropolitan District was placed upon the 
Board. The returns called for by the Board from the various cities 
and towns show that there has been during the past year a general 
compliance with the requirements of the Act, that every city and 
town shall equip with meters all new water services installed and 
shall also equip in each year at least 5 per cent, of all services in- 
stalled prior to January 1, 1908. The city of Quincy, however, has 
not complied with the provisions of the law, either as to the metering 
of the old services or in the equipment of new services. 

It is made the duty of the Board to notify the Attorney-General 
of the violation or neglect to comply with the provisions of the Act 
of 1907 on the part of any city or town, and the municipality is 
made liable to a forfeiture or penalty for each day after December 
31, 1908, during which such violation or neglect continues. 

At the end of the year 28.35 per cent, of all the water services 
in the District had been metered, while at the beginning of the year 
the number metered was 21.5 per cent. Several of the cities and 
towns have proceeded far beyond the requirements of the Act. Ex- 
cluding the city of Boston, 53.5 per cent, of all the services are me- 
tered, and in six of the cities and towns, Maiden, Melrose, Watertown, 
Milton, Belmont and Swampscott, substantially all the services are 
equipped with meters. 



86 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



X. ELECTROLYSIS. 

Various experiments have been carried on during the past few 
years for the prevention of injury to the pipes by electrolytic action, 
occasioned chiefly by the electric currents maintained by the street 
railways where their tracks approach the main pipe lines. Rubber 
insulating joints have in the past two or three years been established 
at certain points in the lines which have been especially affected by 
the electric currents, and these have appeared somewhat to diminish 
the injurious effects. The expense of introducing these joints has 
been paid by the railway company. It is found, however, that after 
a certain period of time the efficiency of these insulating joints 
usually decreased, for the reason that the rubber became carbonized 
and lost its insulating properties. Some of these rubber insulating 
joints have now been replaced with wooden joints, which are not only 
less expensive but seem to be decidedly more enduring and efficient. 
In the laying of new pipe lines during the past year wooden staves 
have been substituted for lead and jute in joints at intervals of 
about 500 feet. This can be done upon the new lines without great 
additional expense, and the result has so far proved very satisfactory. 

The examinations which have been made indicate that the de- 
structive effect of electrolytic action still goes on in greater or 
less degree according to the situation, and the Board has deemed it 
necessary to ask in its request for the appropriations for maintenance 
during the current year a sufficient sum to relay a portion of the main 
pipe on Boylston Street in Cambridge which has been peculiarly 
affected, and which it is feared has reached a condition calling for 
speedy attention. 

XL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

The Board in its abstract of the annual report to the Legislature, 
presented at the beginning of the session of the year 1910, recom- 
mended that it be authorized to construct a new main for the high- 
service districts of Lexington and Arlington and also an additional 
main for the supply of the East Boston district of the city of Boston. 
The recommendations made are as follows : — 

" Some construction additional to that authorized last year seems 
to be called for during the coming year. A new 16-inch main is 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 87 

deemed necessary for the adequate supply of the high-service districts 
in Lexington and Arlington. This is estimated to cost $15,000. 

" An additional main for the improvement of the supply of the 
East Boston district has been asked for by the city of Boston. This 
district is now supplied by two mains laid across the Chelsea Creek, 
which are in so close proximity to each other, and the surroundings of 
which are such, that in case of fire in the neighborhood the entire 
supply for the district might be cut off and that section then be en- 
dangered. The Board after investigation has reached the conclusion 
that a new main should be laid, and it is estimated that this will 
cost a sum not exceeding $100,000. 

" The Board accordingly recommends that, in addition to building 
the works and making the expenditures authorized by the legislatures 
of the preceding years, it be authorized to lay a new main for the 
high-service district in Lexington and Arlington, and to lay an ad- 
ditional main for the supply of the East Boston district of Boston, 
and that authority be given to issue the additional Metropolitan 
Water Loans which will be required, to the amount of $90,000." 

The more detailed estimates which were made subsequently to the 
presentation of the above to the Legislature caused the Board to 
reduce its estimate of the cost of the additional main to East Boston 
from $100,000 to $90,000. The estimates for both the above pur- 
poses, therefore, as reduced would amount to $105,000. Inasmuch 
as there was a balance remaining under the appropriation for the 48- 
inch water main from Chestnut Hill Reservoir through Brookline to 
the Boston boundary line of at least $25,000, the amount of addi- 
tional Metropolitan loans which will be required in the event that 
the recommendations are adopted will be $80,000. 

The attention of the Legislature was also called to the necessity 
of some additional legislation preliminary to the installation of a 
power plant at the Wachusett Dam in Clinton. The . reasons for 
such legislation are set forth as follows : — 

" No constructive work has yet been begun under the appropriation 
made for a power plant at the Wachusett Dam and for the walls 
and floor of the gate-house, for which expenditures of $115,000 and 
$7,000 were respectively authorized. The installation of machinery 
for a power plant has been delayed on account of the uncertainty 
which has existed as to the action which would be taken bv the town 



88 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

of Clinton in the matter of the purchase of the power to be generated, 
and also in order that the valuation of the power plant for purposes 
of taxation in the town of Clinton might be fixed, for which addi- 
tional legislation would seem to be required. 

" Under the statute of 1906, chapter 499, all property held by 
the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board in the town of Clinton, 
outside of the dam and dike, used in the generation or sale of elec- 
tricity for power or for manufacturing purposes, is made subject to 
taxation. It is difficult to determine the extent of the property to 
be used for the generation and sale of power under the language of 
the Act, so as to fix the proper valuation for taxation. It has seemed 
to the Board that such valuation should not exceed the value of the 
structure, machinery and other equipment for the generation of 
power, which would be required in addition to the provisions which 
have been made solely for the purposes of the water supply. Inas- 
much as the Metropolitan Works have been established for the pur- 
pose of the water supply of the Metropolitan Water District, and the 
water is, as is estimated, nearly thirty times more valuable for this 
purpose of a water supply than is its incidental value at market rates 
for power, the Board would not be justified in taking any action 
which would impair the efficiency of the water to the District ; nor 
would it be justified in proceeding to generate power and sell it, 
except at some profit to the District. The amount of power to be 
generated will vary greatly at different periods of the year, and at 
times must be entirely cut off under the exigencies of cleaning, re- 
pairs and accidents, so that the market value is much affected. The 
people of Clinton have also properly felt that the power should be 
disposed of so far as reasonably practicable to the advantage of 
the industries of the town. The taxes upon the plant may make so 
considerable an element in the cost of the power that a high valuation 
would make it impossible to dispose of it without a loss, and without 
a permanently established valuation it would be impossible to fix 
a price for the power and contract for its disposal. The Board ac- 
cordingly recommends that the Legislature shall make or sanction a 
proper valuation of the power plant under the Act of 1906, upon 
which taxes shall be paid to the town of Clinton." 

No additional loans or appropriations are requested for the Sew- 
erage Works, but some legislation seemed called for to enable the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 89 

Board to do certain work which is necessary in the city of Quincy in 
order to carry ont the requirements of the original High-level Sewer 
Act of the year 1899. The recommendation of the board is as fol- 
lows : ■ — 

" The original Act of 1899, chapter 424, section 8, authorizing the 
construction of the High-level Sewer, provided that the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commission should build and operate such new force 
mains and pumping stations as might be necessary to enable the city 
of Quincy to drain its sewerage system into the High-level Sewer. It 
is anticipated that the Board will be called upon during the coming 
year, in accordance with the requirements of that Act, to install a 
small pumping station in that city; and it seems necessary that the 
Board shall be authorized to expend, from the above balance re- 
maining in the South Metropolitan Loan Fund, such sum as may 
be necessary to fulfill the requirements of the statute." 

XII. FUTURE WORK. 

The estimates made for the current year for the maintenance 
and operation of the various works for the water supply and dis- 
tribution of water in the cities and towns of the Metropolitan Water 
District, and of the works constructed for the collection and disposal 
of the sewage of the cities and towns of the North and South Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage districts, and the requests for appropriations 
submitted to the Legislature, amount to $665,000. The amount re- 
quested for the general maintenance of the Water Works is less by 
$9,700 than the appropriation of last year, and for special appro- 
priations is less by $26,000. For the South Metropolitan Sewerage 
Works a sum less by $2,500 is asked for, and for the North Metro- 
politan Sewerage Works an increase of $2,100 is requested. 

It is expected that the amount of construction to be done during 
the year 1910 will considerably exceed that which has been accom- 
plished during the past year. 

The most important of the works already authorized and now in 
progress is the laying of the 60-inch main from the terminus of the 
Weston Aqueduct to connect with the present mains near Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir, which was estimated to cost $750,000. 

The building of a new pumping engine for the high service at the 
Chestnut Hill pumping station is in progress, and the contract calls 
for the completion in the early part of the year 1911. 



90 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

If the small additional appropriation requested for the purpose, on 
account of maintenance, is made, the Board will at once proceed to 
carry out the proposed improvements of the Cochituate watershed by 
disposing of the surface drainage of the village of Cochituate in Way- 
land, for which plans and specifications are completed. 

Various minor works for the protection of the water supply and 
the prevention of the pollution of the water are contemplated to be 
made upon the maintenance account. 

If the authority ajsked for is obtained in accordance with its rec- 
ommendations, the Board will forthwith proceed to lay a new main 
in Arlington for the reinforcement of the high service, and will also 
lay an additional main in Chelsea across Chelsea Creek for the better 
supply of the East Boston district. 

It is also anticipated that arrangements will be completed by which 
the Board can proceed to the installation of a power plant at the 
Wachusett Dam in Clinton, for which an appropriation of $115,000 
has already been made, with an additional sum of $7,000 for com- 
pleting the power and gate house. 

The work of enlargement and equipment with engines, pumps and 
boilers of the pumping stations at East Boston and at Deer Island 
is in progress and will be actively prosecuted during the year. 

The Board has been called upon by the city of Quincy to proceed 
to the construction of a small pumping station and force main in 
order that the sewage of a low area in the eastern part of that city 
may be lifted into the Metropolitan High-level Sewer, as required 
by the original High-level Sewer Act, and this construction will prob- 
ably be undertaken early in the current year. 

The detailed reports of the Chief Engineer of the Water Works 
and of the Chief Engineer of the Sewerage Works, with various 
tables and statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY H. SPRAGITE. 
HENRY P. WALCOTT. 
JAMES A. BAILEY, JR. 

Boston, February 26, 1910. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 



EEPOET OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF WATER WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the work under the 
charge of the Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Water Works for 
the year ending December 31, 1909. 

General Statement. 

The Chief Engineer has under his charge not only the design and 
construction of new works, but also the maintenance and operation 
of the works already constructed. During the past year the amount 
of construction work in progress has been larger than for several 
previous years, the principal items of which are the completion of 
a 48-inch main for increasing the supply of water in the Boston 
low-service district, .the laying of 24-inch and 16-inch mains to re- 
inforce the supply in Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop, Swampscott and 
■JSTahant, the laying of a 12-inch main connecting with the Arlington 
standpipe, for the purpose of supplying water to the higher portions 
of the town of Belmont, and the laying' of a portion of a line of 60- 
inch pipe, about 7 miles in length, for the purpose of bringing an addi- 
tional supply of water from the Weston Aqueduct into the Metro- 
politan District. A contract has also been made for an additional 
pumping engine for the supply of the southern high-service district, 
which includes the city of Quincy, the towns of Milton, Watertown 
and Belmont and the higher portions of the city of Boston. 

In connection with the maintenance of the works, improvements 
have been made at the Clinton sewerage filter-beds and at Lake Co- 
chituate ; changes have been made in the 30-inch high-service main 
in Maiden, made necessary by the abolition of grade crossings, and 
in the 48-inch main in Cambridge, made necessary by the - construc- 
tion of the subway of the Boston Elevated Railway. An addition to 
the West Roxbury pumping station has been constructed in which 
has been installed a pumping engine and boiler. 



92 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Organization. 

Since July 1, William E. Eoss, who had previously had special 
charge, as division engineer, of electrolytic investigations and con- 
struction work in the Metropolitan District, has had more general 
charge of engineering work as assistant to the Chief Engineer. 

The principal assistants employed under the direction of the 
Chief Engineer at the close of the year were as follows : — 

William E. Foss, . . Assistant to Chief Engineer. 

Elliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent, Wachusett Department. 

Charles E. Haberstroh, Superintendent, Sudbury Department. 

Samuel E. Killam, . Superintendent, Pipe Lines and Reservoirs, Dis- 
tribution Department. 

Arthur E. O'Neil, . Superintendent, Pumping Stations, Distribution 

Department. 

Alfred 0. Doane, . Division Engineer, specially in charge of engineer- 

ing work at pumping stations. 

George E. Howe, . . Assistant Engineer. 

Clifford Foss, . . Assistant Engineer. 

Benjamin F. Haneox, . Assistant in charge of Drafting Department. 

William E. Whittaker, Office Assistant. 

Arthur W. Walker, . Biologist. 

William W. Locke, . Sanitary Inspector. 

At the beginning of the year the engineering force, including 
those engaged upon both the construction and maintenance of the 
works, numbered 40, and at the end of the year 48. 

There has also been a maintenance force, exclusive of the en- 
gineers above mentioned, averaging 249, employed in the operation 
of the several pumping stations and in connection with the mainte- 
nance of the reservoirs, aqueducts and pipe lines, and in doing minor 
construction work. 

The number of men employed in the maintenance force of the sev- 
eral departments has been as follows : — 




CO 








'"'TV <i*fii Ctl > , ft <%,■''. ,1 .; 



co 



O 

h 

00 

O 

03 



< 



CO 



< 

_J 

O 

CL 

O 

DC 
h" 
UJ 



(3 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



93 



Beginning 
of Year. 



End of 
Year. 



Average. 



Wachusett Department, 

Sudbury Department 

Distribution Department, pipe lines and reservoirs, 
Distribution Department, pumping service, 



40 
62 
70 
61 



233 



37 

43 
76 
60 



216 



52 
59 
77 
61 



249 



In addition to the men employed directly by the Board an average 
of 112 men was employed from April 1 to December 31 by the con- 
tractors engaged in laying water pipes in different parts of the 
Metropolitan District. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

New 48-ijs t ch Supply Main foe the Boston Low-service 

District. 

An expenditure of $190,000 was authorized for this work and con- 
tracts for furnishing and laying the pipe were made and the work 
partially completed during the year 1908. Bruno & Petitti, the con- 
tractors for laying the pipe, suspended work during the winter, re- 
sumed active operations on March 15 and completed the work of 
laying the pipe on July 10. The connections with the existing mains 
were made by the employes of the department and the new line was 
placed in service on September 14. A test of the main from Chestnut 
Hill Eeservoir to the 36-inch valve near Coolidge Corner, a distance of 
8,504 feet made on September 13, showed a leakage of but 30 gallons 
per hour. This main connects with the existing 48-inch mains at a 
point near the easterly end of the Chestnut Hill Eeservoir and ex- 
tends through Beacon Street and Longwood Avenue, a distance of 
12,400 feet, to the Eiverway on the Boston side of the Longwood 
Avenue Bridge, where it connects with a 48-inch main of the city 
of Boston. Connections were also made between the new main and 
the existing Metropolitan and Boston 48-inch mains on Beacon Street 
near Coolidge Corner. A 48-inch Yenturi meter was set in this line 
at the Eiverway, for use in measuring the water delivered to the city 
of Boston. 



94 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The laying of this main reduced the loss of head by friction 
between the pumping station at Chestnut Hill and the section of the 
city of Boston lying between Roxbury and Dover Street 20 to 
25 feet. For the purpose of preventing injury to this main by elec- 
trolysis, insulating joints of wood were made at intervals of about 
500 feet. 

The total cost of the work was as follows : — 



$5,720 


59 


95,912 


75 


9,640 


94 


37,996 


06 


4,653 


63 


542 


21 


8,231 88 


$162,698 


06 



Engineering, .... 

Pipes and special castings, . 

Valves and valve chambers, 

Laying pipes by contract, . 

Resurfacing streets in Brookline, 

Changing location of pipes of Brookline Water Works, 

Stock and labor on connection with existing pipes, . 



60-inch Supply Pipe Line. 

The Legislature of the year 1909 authorized the expenditure of 
$750,000 for constructing a pipe line for the purpose of bringing 
additional water from the Weston Aqueduct into the Metropolitan 
District. The work to be done involves the laying of about 32,250 
feet of 60-inch cast-iron pipe and the construction of a pressure 
tunnel 6 feet 4 inches in diameter, 1,900 feet long, and a cement- 
lined and concrete-covered steel pipe 6 feet 4 inches in diameter and 
500 feet long. 

Contracts for furnishing 8,000 tons of 60-inch pipe were made 
about the middle of May with the United States Cast Iron Pipe and 
Foundry Company of New York, ~N. Y., and the Florence Iron 
Works of Camden, 1ST. J., and for 200 tons of special castings with 
the Standard Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Company of Bristol, Pa. 
The value of work done under these contracts on December 31 was 
approximately $142,070. 

On August 18 a contract was made with the Charles J. Jacobs 
Company for laying about 8,000 feet of this pipe, extending from the 
corner of Beacon Street and Chestnut Hill Avenue, in Brighton, 
through Chestnut Hill and Commonwealth avenues, and through 
land of the Commonwealth alongside the Cochituate Aqueduct to a 
point near the ventilating chamber of the aqueduct in ISTewton. 
Trench excavation under this contract was begun on August 26, pipe 




CHESTNUT HILL PIPE YARD-LOADING 60-inch PIPE. 




UNLOADING 60-inch PIPE on Pipe Line in Brighton. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 95 

laying on September 1, and the work was continued with an average 
force of 87 men until December 24, when active operations were 
suspended for the season. The value of the work done under this 
contract on December 31 was $25,902.53, which includes the laying 
of 5,349 feet of 60-inch pipe and the excavation of 2,518 cubic 
yards of rock. 

Joints of wood, in place of the ordinary lead joint, have been 
placed in this pipe line at intervals of about 500 feet, for the pur- 
pose of reducing the amount of electric current flowing on the pipe 
line. The construction of the pressure tunnel and the laying of 
about 9,800 feet of 60-inch pipe will be contracted for early in the 
coming year. 

24-inch Northern High-service Pipe Line in Everett, Revere 

and Chelsea, Section 33. 

At times during the summer season when the use of water for street 
and lawn sprinkling was very large the main supplying water to the 
towns of Winthrop, Revere, Swampscott and Nahant has for several 
years been of inadequate size to supply the quantity of water used 
without undue loss of pressure, and to remedy this condition the exist- 
ing main has been reinforced by laying a 24-inch main from the 
junction of Broadway and Hancock Street, in Everett, through Broad- 
way, High, Eoster, Arlington and Nichols streets, in Everett ; Nichols 
Street, Washington Avenue and Fenno Street, in Chelsea, and Eenno 
Street, in Revere, to the junction of Broadway, a distance of 12,326 
feet. 

A contract for furnishing pipe and special castings required for 
this work was made with the Standard Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry 
Company of Bristol, Pa., on May 7, and a contract for laying the 
pipe was made with Camoia & Williams of Boston, on July 16. 

The contractors began the work of laying pipe on July 20 and 
completed the pipe laying on December 17. The force employed 
averaged 44 men. 

All connections between this main and the existing main were made- 
by the maintenance force. A portion of the main between Murray 
Street, in Chelsea, and Broadway, in Revere, about 6,585 feet in 
length, was placed in service on December 9, and the remaining por- 
tion was first used on December 30. 



96 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The immediate effect of the use of this main was to increase the 
pressure near the junction of the pipe lines supplying Nahant and 
Swampscott about 5 pounds per square inch. The effect during the 
summer season, when the consumption is large, will be much greater. 
The final payments for laying the pipes have not been made, but the 
cost of the whole work will vary but little from $59,200. 

16-inch Pipe Line foe the Supply of Winthrop, Section 32. 

This main, 3,945 feet long, extending from near the Beachmont 
Station of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad, in Revere, 
through Winthrop Avenue to the Winthrop town line, has been laid 
to improve the supply in the town of Winthrop and takes the place 
of a 12-inch main belonging to the town of Revere, which has here- 
tofore been used for the supply of Winthrop. 

The laying of this pipe was commenced by Camoia & Williams, 
contractors for the work, on August 4, and carried on with a force 
of from 21 to 56 men. The work of the contractors was completed on 
September 25, after which the connections with the existing mains 
were made by the maintenance force, and the new main was placed 
in service on October 23. The cost of the work, including labor and 
materials, was $12,500. 

Northern Extra High-service Pipe Line to Belmont, 

Section 34. 

In order that buildings on the higher land in Belmont may be 
supplied from the Metropolitan Works, a 12-inch pipe line, 1,610 
feet in length, has been laid from the standpipe on Arlington Heights 
through Park Avenue, in Arlington, to the Belmont line. This work, 
with the exception of the connections, was done by Angelo De Marco 
& Co., under a contract made on August 12. The connections with 
existing mains were made by the maintenance force and the line 
put in service on November 18. A 6-inch Hersey detector meter, 
model F.M., with a 3-inch meter on the by-pass, was set on Park 
Avenue at the Belmont line. This meter automatically registers the 
ordinary domestic consumption of a few takers as well as the 
larger quantity required in case of fire. The cost of this work was 
$4,604.43. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 97 

Pumping Engine for the Southern High Service. 

On September 21 a contract was made with the Holly Manufac- 
turing Company of Buffalo, N. Y., for the construction and erection, 
at the low-service pumping station at Chestnut Hill, of a triple ex- 
pansion, crank and fly-wheel pumping engine, having a capacity of 
40,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours, for the sum of $99,769. 
The making of detailed drawings of the engine has been in progress 
for several months and construction work has been recently com- 
menced. The contract calls for the completion of the work before 
March 12, 1911. 

Miscellaneous. 

At the Wachusett Dam inscriptions have been cut in the gran- 
ite gate posts at the Boylston Street entrance, and two bronze tab- 
lets have been placed on the exterior face of the lower gate-chamber 
briefly setting forth historical facts relative to the Metropolitan 
Water Works, particularly the Wachusett Reservoir. The cutting 
of the inscriptions cost $228.80, and the two tablets cost $425. 

A tile floor has been laid in the exciter room at the lower gate- 
house at the Wachusett Dam, at a cost of $203.37. 

The maintenance force has unloaded from cars about 9,840 tons 
of pipes as received from the foundries, and loaded 7,310 tons on 
teams of contractors who have laid the pipes. On account of lack 
of storage room at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard, and in order to 
shorten the length of haul, arrangements have been made with the 
Boston & Albany Railroad for the use of land near the Woodland 
Station, in Newton, for use in storing 60-inch pipes, and since No- 
vember 24 the pipes have been received and stored at that point. 
About 350 tons of pipe which are to be laid to reinforce the supply 
in Swampscott were inspected and unloaded, and are now stored on 
land near the Swampscott Station of the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

Engineering. 

The work of the engineering force in connection with construction 
has included the preparation of plans and specifications for the pur- 
chase of pipes, valves and other materials for use in connection with 
the several pipe lines which have been under construction ; the super- 
vision of the several contracts for pipe laying; the preparation of 



98 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

specifications and the examination of plans for the new pumping en- 
gine at the Chestnut Hill Station; the making of surveys, plans and 
estimates of cost of new mains for the supply of East Boston, Ar- 
lington and Lexington; and the making of surveys and borings to 
determine the most economical plan for a tunnel on the line of the 
60-inch main in Newton. Considerable time has been spent upon 
record plans of completed work. 



MAINTENANCE. 

Rainfall and Yield. 

The rainfall on the several watersheds for the whole year was from 
3.5 to 4 inches below the average. During the latter half of the 
year the rainfall was about 5 inches less than the average for the 
corresponding period but not as low as during the previous year. 
The yearly total on the Wachusett watershed was 44.50 inches and 
on the Sudbury watershed 41.75 inches. 

Statistics relating to the rainfall and yield of watersheds may be 
found in Appendix No. 4, tables Nos. 1 to 8. 

Storage Reservoirs. 

The quantity stored in all the storage reservoirs on January 1, 
1909, was 58,890,300,000 gallons. During January, and until 
February 9, the yield of the watersheds was less than the consump- 
tion and the amount of storage was reduced to 57,300,000,000 gal- 
lons. During the following three months the rainfall exceeded the 
average and on May 10 the quantity stored had risen to 78,406,000,- 
000 gallons. The maximum storage was on June 14, when the 
reservoirs contained 79,112,800,000 gallons, which was very nearly 
the same as the quantity stored on the corresponding date in 1908. 
There was an almost continual loss of storage from the middle of 
June until December 31, although the loss during the last three 
months of the year was less than in 1908, and at the close of the 
year the quantity stored was 62,101,500,000 gallons, or 3,211,200,- 
000 gallons more than at the beginning of the year. 

The following table gives the quantity of water stored in the stor- 
age reservoirs at the beginning of each month : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



99 



Quantity of Water stored in Wachusett Reservoir, and in Reservoirs on Sud- 
bury and Cochituate Watersheds, at the Beginning of Each Month. 



Date. 



In Wachusett 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 



In Sudbury 

Reservoir and 

Framingham 

Reservoir 

No. 3 
(Gallons). 



In All Other 

Storage 

Reservoirs 

(Gallons). 



Total 
(Gallons). 



1909. 

January 1, 

February 1, 
March 1, . 
April 1, 
May 1, 
June 1, 
July 1, 
August 1, . 
September 1, . 
October 1, . 
November 1, . 
December 1, 

1910. 

January 1, 



46,176,000,000 
44,405,700,000 
51,397,300,000 
56,174,400,000 
62,215,400,000 
63,692,600,000 
63,012,200,000 
60,461,500,000 
57,900,700,000 
57,054,400,000 
54,453,500,000 
50,063,900,000 

48,667,800,000 



6,495,300,000 
7,207,600,000 
7,004,200,000 
7,544,400,000 
7,903,000,000 
7,892,100,000 
7,926,700,000 
7,913,600,000 
7,891,800,000 
6,555,400,000 
5,694,700,000 
7,836,000,000 

7,806,400,000 



6,219,000,000 
6,189,900,000 
7,011,200,000 
7,065,500,000 
7,207,000,000 
7,243,900,000 
6,923,500,000 
6,165,300,000 
5,620,900,000 
5,459,200,000 
5,379,000,000 
5,443,400,000 

5,627,300,000 



58,890,300,000 
57,803,200,000 
65,412,700,000 
70,784,300,000 
77,325,400,000 
78,828,600,000 
77,862,400,000 
74,540,400,000 
71,413,400,000 
69,069,000,000 
65,527,200,000 
63,343,300,000 

62,101,500,000 



Wachusett Reservoir and Dam. — At the beginning of the year 
the water in this reservoir was 15.13 feet below high-water mark 
and the reservoir contained 46,176,000,000 gallons. The reservoir 
reached its lowest level on February 6, when it was 17.08 feet below 
high-water mark; from this time until June 14 there was a gradual 
and practically continuous rise in the elevation of the reservoir sur- 
face, the maximum elevation for the year being 394.4 feet, or 0.6 of 
a foot below high water, and the reservoir contained 64,161,000,000 
gallons. The only water discharged from the reservoir into the river 
below the dam was that required for the use of the Lancaster Mills. 
This quantity was measured by Venturi meters at the dam, and 
averaged 2,536,000 gallons per day for the whole year. 

The action of the waves on the shores of the reservoir has made 
necessary the stripping of soil on the north shore at Kendall Cove, 
and on the south shore between Sawyer's Mills Bluffs, in Boylston, 
and Pine Hill, in West Boylston. The strip from which soil was 
removed was from 6 to 20 feet in width for a length of 5,000 feet 



100 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and had an area of 1.46 acres. The amount expended on this work 
was $614.83. During the latter portion of the year, while the shores 
of the reservoir were exposed to a depth of from 8 to 10 feet below 
high water, the roots, stumps and miscellaneous debris which had 
been uncovered by the action of the waves were collected and burned. 

Driftwood which had accumulated during the past two years along 
the shores of the Quinepoxet and Stillwater rivers, for a distance of 
4,000 feet above the reservoir, was also collected and burned. 

A motor scow 30% feet long and 9 feet wide, having a carrying 
capacity of 7.5 tons, and operated by a 10 horse-power gasolene mo- 
tor, was designed by the engineering department and built by the 
maintenance force during the early part of the year at a cost of 
$799.92. It has been used with very satisfactory results during the 
past season for transporting men and supplies about the reservoir. 

During the spring and fall about 36 acres of grass land on the back 
slopes of the North and South dikes were fertilized with 646 cubic 
yards of sludge collected in the settling tanks at the Clinton sewerage 
filter-beds, at a cost of $655.92; and 256 cubic yards of the sludge 
were spread on the grounds below the dam, at a cost of $259.94. 

The grass on about 350 acres of land on the North and South 
dikes, along the shores of the reservoir and on outlying parcels of 
land has been sold for the sum of $2,347.50. Brush and weeds have 
been mowed and burned on the 50-foot margin of the reservoir for a 
distance of about 30 miles, at a cost of $1,168.70, or $38.96 per 
mile. Six stone monuments, marked with the initials of the towns, 
have been set near the shores of the reservoir to mark the town boun- 
dary lines at the following locations : On the crest of the South Dike, 
between the towns of Clinton and Boylston; on the crest of the 
westerly portion of the North Dike, between the towns of Clinton 
and Sterling ; on the shore of Prescott Cove, between, the towns of 
Sterling and Boylston ; on the south shore of the reservoir near Pine 
Hill, between the towns of Boylston and West Boylston; on the 
northerly shore of the west arm of South Bay, between the towns of 
Boylston and West Boylston, and on the easterly shore of Stillwater 
Basin, between the towns of West Boylston and Sterling. 

The iron guard fences on the bridges over the reservoir at Beaman 
and Thomas streets, West Boylston, have been cleaned and painted. 

The Connecticut River Transmission Company has, by permission 
of the board, crossed the Wachusett Reservoir and lands on either 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 101 

side, for a distance of 7,130 feet, with lines of wires to be used in 
transmitting electricity under a pressure of 66,000 volts from a power 
plant located on the Connecticut River near Brattleboro, Vt., to the 
city of Worcester, Mass., and has also crossed the North Dike and 
other lands near the Wachusett Dam with a line of wooden poles and 
wires 6,100 feet long, carrying current under a pressure of 13,200 
volts to the Lancaster Mills, the city of Marlborough, and the towns 
of Berlin, Shrewsbury, Northborough, Westborough and South- 
borough. The line to Worcester crosses the reservoir about 500 feet 
east of the Worcester Street Bridge by six steel cables, % °^ an i ncn 
in diameter, 1,970 feet long, suspended from steel towers 30 feet 
square at the base and 75 feet high. There is one tower on the north 
side of the reservoir 60 feet high and 25 feet square at the base, 
and the remaining eleven towers are 40 feet high and 14 feet square 
at the base, spaced' about 350 feet apart, and support six No. 2 copper 
cables, each cable consisting of seven strands of No. 10 wire. The 
towers also support two telephone wires and one guard wire for pro- 
tection from lightning. For the privilege of maintaining this line 
the Company has agreed to pay $300 per annum, and to keep 
a strip of land 40 feet in width free from tall grass, weeds and un- 
derbrush. 

The line leading to the Lancaster Mills is constructed with chestnut 
poles about 40 feet long, spaced from 100 to 125 feet apart, sup- 
porting six No. 2 copper cables for the transmission of power current, 
two telephone wires and a guard wire. Eor the privilege of main- 
taining this line the Company will pay $100 per annum. 

On November 3 the headquarters of the Wachusett Department 
were moved from the building on Walnut Street, in Clinton, to the 
lower gate-chamber at the dam. Before making this change it was 
necessary to install sanitary conveniences, extend the electric lighting 
system, and do considerable carpenter work and painting. The tele- 
phone and electric light wires between Boylston Street and the 
gate-chamber, a distance of about 470 feet, were placed underground 
in two lines of Orangeburg fiber conduit. The total cost of fitting 
the rooms in the lower gate-chamber, moving the furniture, plans, 
etc., from the Walnut Street office, and laying underground conduit, 
was $1,693.04. 

Such repairs as were necessary to keep in good condition the 14 



102 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

houses belonging to the Board have been made from time to time, 
the principal ones being as follows: Slating the house, barn and 
sheds on the Henry March property, in Oakdale, occupied by fore- 
man Bray, using slate secured from buildings on property leased 
to William B. Woods, in West Boylston, and building a carriage shed 
with lumber secured from old buildings on the Anna E. Russell 
property; remodeling and repairing large store-house and black- 
smith shop at the Wilson Street storage yard ; painting, whitewashing 
and papering at the Cutting, Lamson and Tucker houses in Boylston, 
at the Eckstein and Kramer houses in Clinton, and at the Lalone 
and C. McLean houses in Lancaster ; repairing chimneys on the A. 
McLean house in Lancaster, and on the Eckstein, Kramer and 
Beaven houses in Clinton. These houses are rented. 

On the afternoon of August 27 the house and barn on the Liv- 
ingston property on Mill Street, Lancaster, were 'destroyed by fire. 
The grounds at this place have been since cleaned and left in a safe 
and neat condition. 

The buildings on land acquired from Anna E. Russell, in Oak- 
dale, and from Willie R. Mitchell, in Sterling, have been sold and 
removed from within the limits of the watershed. The house and 
barn on land purchased from Tennis and Louisa Dugas, at Sterling 
Junction, were disposed of by them in accordance with the terms of 
purchase. Cellar holes on these three properties have been filled and 
the adjacent grounds have been cleaned and left in a neat and sanitary 
condition. 

Two parcels of land have been leased by the Board for pasturage 
purposes, one containing 16 acres at Sterling Junction, and one 
containing 10 acres at Oakdale. The aggregate receipts for the year 
were $25. 

A right was sold to the town of Boylston to take sand and gravel 
from an area containing 0.25 of an acre near the Six Nations school- 
house lot. 

During the year 109 stone monuments and 11 iron bolts have been 
set and 20 stone monuments reset, for the purpose of permanently 
marking the corners of property around the Wachusett Reservoir, on 
the Wachusett watershed and along the Wachusett Aqueduct where 
bounds had not been previously placed. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — All the water supplied to the Metropolitan 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 103 

District from the Wachusett Reservoir passes through the Sudbury 
Reservoir and its level is largely controlled by the manipulation of 
the gates controlling the now through the Wachusett Aqueduct. At 
the beginning of the year this reservoir was 3.23 feet below the stone 
crest of the dam, and it was kept between % of a foot and 3 feet 
below the crest until April 2, after which date the water flowed over 
the crest until September 17. During the following month the 
reservoir was lowered nearly 6 feet for the purpose of facilitating 
the work of improving the Southborough swimming pool, and after 
that work was completed was again filled, and water flowed over the 
crest of the dam from November 24 to the end of the year. 

At the request of the town of Southborough improvements have 
been made at the swimming pool, which was constructed in 1908. Eor 
the purpose of making it more convenient and safe for the bathers 
the deeper portion of the pool was filled so that its greatest depth is 
now about 6 feet, and the slope of the shore on one side of the pool 
was flattened to a slope of 8 horizontal to 1 vertical below the water 
line, and 4 horizontal to 1 vertical above the water. The slope was 
covered to a depth of eight inches with clean sharp sand. The material 
excavated was used in grading the land on the south side of the pool 
so as to divert the surface drainage from the adjoining hillside away 
from the swimming pool into the reservoir. The cost of this improve- 
ment was $393.33, one-half of which was paid by the town of South- 
borough. The town has also provided proper sanitary conveniences 
for the bathers and has constructed a fence at the westerly end of the 
pool to screen the bathers from public view. A bath house has been 
constructed at the expense of Mr. Robert M. Burnett and given to 
the town. Five hundred pine trees have been planted on the grounds, 
and when grown these trees will completely hide the pool from view 
from the highways. 

The ledge at the foot of the masonry overflow at the Sudbury Dam 
contains seams of slaty rock which has disintegrated during the 
past ten years, through the action of frost and water flowing over the 
dam. To prevent further wearing away of the rock, and the loosen- 
ing of the paving at the foot of the dam, about 50 cubic yards of 
Portland cement concrete were placed in the larger cavities and open 
joints in the paving and the seams in the rock were pointed. The 
cost of this work was about $500. 



104 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The dwelling Louse at the dam was given two coats of paint and 
the barn and shed one coat, and the house at the Cratty place, in 
Fayville, was given one coat of paint. Cellars from which houses 
have been removed on the Ransom and Ball places were filled and 
the ground graded. Some grading has been done on wood roads 
which are being built on the north and south sides of the reservoir, 
when opportunity offers. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3. — The elevation of the water in 
this reservoir is controlled by drafts from the Sudbury Reservoir 
and its surface was maintained from 0.15 of a foot to 4.55 feet below 
the crest of the overflow throughout the year. No water was al- 
lowed to waste from the reservoir into Framingham Reservoir No. 1. 
About 4,000 feet of Wheelock wire fence were built between prop- 
erty of the Board and Alfred N. Thompson on the north side of 
the reservoir, and Thomas Sampson and Andrew Stensson on the 
south side of the reservoir, to prevent cattle from obtaining access 
to the water. This fence is constructed with six No. 9 wires 
stretched horizontally between chestnut posts set 12 feet apart, and 
between each pair of posts four No. 8 vertical rods are securely 
clamped to the horizontal wires at each intersection, making a rigid 
fence. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2. — Water was drawn from this res- 
ervoir for use in the Metropolitan District from January 7 to Feb- 
ruary 12. During the remainder of the year water was wasting 
over the dam during the greater portion of the time. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1. — The water in this reservoir was 
above the level of the crest of the dam throughout the year, with the 
exception of a few days in January and until the last of June water 
was allowed to waste in addition to the 1,500,000 gallons per day 
which the law requires shall constantly flow into the river below the 
dam. During the succeeding four months but little water was 
wasted, and during the last two months of the year small quantities 
were wasted during the greater portion of the time. 

Ashland Reservoir. — No water was drawn from this reservoir for 
the supply of the Metropolitan District. On January 1, 1909, the 
water was 0.13 of a foot above the crest of the overflow and the 
reservoir remained substantially full throughout the year. The 
bridge over the waste-way channel was rebuilt. 

Ilophinton Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year water in 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 105 

this reservoir was above the crest of the overflow. From January 13 
to February 12 water was drawn from the reservoir for the supply of 
the District and its surface was lowered 4% feet. It was again 
full on February 27 and remained full throughout the remainder of 
the year. A 6-strand Wheelock wire fence 1,270 feet long was built 
on the line between property of the Commonwealth and Julia Raf- 
tery, to replace a fence destroyed by a forest fire. Fences were built 
for a distance of about 400 feet on each side of the public road 
which crosses the upper end of the reservoir. These were constructed 
with chestnut posts set 8 feet apart and three longitudinal 2-inch x 
5-inch spruce rails. The filter-beds were cleaned in the spring and 
weeded in the fall. 

Whitehall Reservoir. — This reservoir was practically full through- 
out the year as it was not drawn upon for the supply of the Metropoli- 
tan District. Five new cottages were built by owners of land near the 
reservoir, making the total number at the end of the year 43. There 
were in use during the season 13 motor boats, 2 sailboats, 45 row- 
boats and 19 canoes, a total of 79 boats of all kinds, as compared 
with 87 for the previous year. 

Farm Pond. — No water was turned into this pond from the reser- 
voirs on the Sudbury River, and no water was drawn from the pond 
for the use of the District. The town of Framingham has drawn 
the greater portion of its supply from the filter-gallery alongside the 
pond, but during each month of the year, with the exception of 
the months of March and May, has drawn some water directly from 
the Sudbury Aqueduct. 

Lake Cochituate. — The water in the lake at the beginning of 
the year was 2.58 feet below high-water. On February 18 the water 
was but a few inches below high-water mark and the waste gates 
were opened at the dam. Water was allowed to waste until June 4. 
On June 6 the lake was drawn upon for the supply of the Metropol- 
itan District, and a continuous draft of about 20,000,000 gallons 
per day during the succeeding four months lowered its surface 8 
feet. During the latter part of September the water acquired an 
objectionable taste and odor, due to a growth of microscopic or- 
ganisms, and its use was discontinued during the remainder of the 
year. As a result the surface gradually rose, and at the end of the 
year was 5.6 feet below high water. 

During the year several improvements have been made and plans 



106 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

for further improvements prepared for the purpose of protecting the 
purity of the water and improving the existing conditions around 
the lake shores. Strips of land have been acquired at several points 
for the purpose of increasing the width of the margin of land con- 
trolled by the Board. Wheelock wire fencing aggregating 3,012 feet 
in length has been built adjoining property of Abbott Whitcomb and 
R. G. Bayer et al. for the purpose of preventing cattle from obtaining 
access to the water. Four coves where the water was shallow when 
the lake was full, and the resulting growth of aquatic vegetation pre- 
sented a somewhat objectionable appearance, have been filled with 
material excavated from the bed of the lake. The largest of these 
areas, located in the northerly section of the lake, between Lyon's 
island and the easterly shore, covered an area of 47,300 square feet, 
and its improvement required the moving of about 3,600 cubic yards 
of material, at a cost of 26 cents per cubic yard. An area of 17,400 
square feet on the west shore of the lake, adjoining land belonging to 
the heirs of Willard Morse, was filled with 1,700 cubic yards of 
material, at a cost of 33 cents per cubic yard. One of the small 
coves was located on the west shore of the lake, at the southern end, 
near the Boston & Albany Railroad, and another on the east shore 
just north of the effluent gate-house. In all four of these cases the 
sand and gravel, mixed in some cases with clay, was moved with 
wheeled scrapers and carts, and the surface of the material in the 
coves was left slightly more than 1% feet above high-water mark. 
The cost of the work done at the four coves was $1,782.67. 

During the early part of the year surveys and plans were made 
for the construction of works for the diversion of the surface drainage 
of the village of Cochituate from Snake Brook, which flows into 
Lake Cochituate, into Banister's Brook, which discharges into the 
Sudbury River. Proposals for constructing these works were re- 
ceived on October 4, but as the lowest price bid indicated that the 
cost of the whole work would exceed the amount appropriated by the 
Legislature it was deemed advisable to reject all bids and postpone 
the work until another season. It was thought advisable, however, to 
take advantage of the low stage of the water in the lake to place a pipe 
across the culvert between the north and middle divisions of the lake, 
and 32% feet of 36-inch cast-iron pipe, which will eventually form 
a portion of the proposed channel, was laid by the maintenance force, 
at a cost of $423.90. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 107 

No boats were allowed on the lake during the past season and there 
was no increase in the number of cottages. 

No water was drawn from Dudley Pond during the year, and its 
elevation ranged between 2.22 feet below high water in May, and 4.15 
feet below in November. Three new cottages were built on the 
shores of the pond during the year, making 22 at the present time. 

Under authority given by chapter 282 of the Acts of 1909 the 
control of Dug Pond has been transferred to the town of Natick and 
the connections between the pond and Lake Cochituate have been 
closed. The 24-inch brick conduit and the 18-inch Akron pipe, which 
were the channels between the pond and the lake, were permanently 
closed with concrete during the month of July. Some water flowed 
into the lake from the pond during March, April, May and June. 
After July 10 there was no flow into the lake and the work of clos- 
ing the connection was completed on July 27. The town of Natick 
has excavated a channel from the south end of the pond leading into 
the watershed of the Charles River. This channel is about 230 feet 
long, 2 feet wide at the bottom, with a maximum depth of 5 feet. 
The invert of the channel is at grade 153.75. The elevation of the 
invert of the old outlet at the north end of the pond was 152.36. 

Sources from which Water for the Supply of the Metropol- 
itan District has been taken. 

An average of 99,312,000 gallons per day was drawn from the 
Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett Aqueduct into the Sud- 
bury Reservoir. An average of 29,440,000 gallons per day was 
drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct 
into the distributing system of the Metropolitan District. From 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2 an average of 2,467,000 gallons per 
day and from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 an average of 81,046,- 
000 gallons per day were drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct. 
From Lake Cochituate an average of 6,774,000 gallons per day 
was drawn through the Cochituate Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir. The Spot Pond drainage area furnished 290,000 gallons per 
day. No water was drawn from the Ashland and Whitehall reser- 
voirs during the year. 



108 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in use 7,340 hours, equivalent to 
305.8 days, during the year. The masonry portion of the aqueduct 
was not cleaned during the year. The upper end of the open channel 
was cleaned for a distance of 4,070 feet by removing the weeds and 
water grasses, which had attained such a growth as materially to 
retard the flow of the water. This work was done while the channel 
was emptied to facilitate the work of laying the inlet pipe for the 
supply of the Westborough Insane Hospital. Repairs have been 
made at the upper and lower dams of the open channel, consisting 
of cleaning and pointing the masonry joints, scraping and painting 
the iron flashboard supports and fences and painting the plank 
bridges. The iron fences on the Assabet Bridge and on all bridges 
crossing the open channel have been cleaned and painted. Six-strand 
Wheelock wire fencing, 6,157 feet in length, has been constructed 
along portions of the open channel and aqueduct land where cattle 
were being pastured on the adjoining property. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in continuous use throughout the year. 
Extensive repairs have been made upon the exterior brick masonry 
of the Echo Bridge, upon which the aqueduct crosses the Charles 
River between Newton and Wellesley. During the thirty-three years 
since this bridge was built the exposed brickwork on both sides of the 
bridge had become disintegrated, so that it was necessary to repoint, 
or to take down and relay, the brickwork over a surface of about 740 
square yards. The joints in the upper and lower belt courses of 
granite and in the flat surface of the landings on the east and west 
abutments were pointed with elastic cement. A force of 8 masons 
and from 1 to 2 laborers was employed in making these repairs from 
August 16 to November 17, and the total cost of labor and materials 
was $3,730. 

The joints in the granite masonry on the north side of the sub- 
structure of Bacon's waste-weir and in the sandstone at the entrance 
to Clark's waste-weir were' repointed. The iron railings, stairways 
and manhole covers at the Waban and Echo bridges, the iron gratings 
and floor beams at the Course Brook waste-weir and the doors of the 
siphon chambers at Rosemary Brook were painted. Considerable 
work has been done for the purpose of improving the sod on the slopes 
of the aqueduct embankments. This work has consisted of spreading 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 109 

loam, grass seed and 18 1 /! tons of wood ashes on the surface of the 
higher embankments. 

A concrete conduit 18 inches square, containing four 3-inch ducts, 
was laid over the aqueduct at Boylston Street, Newton, by the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use 3,012 hours, equivalent to 
125.5 days. The interior of the aqueduct, for a distance of 1% 
miles from the pumping station at Chestnut Hill, was cleaned in May 
and again in December. The remainder of the aqueduct was not 
cleaned during the year. Considerable work has been done along the 
line of the aqueduct in cutting and burning dead and undesirable trees 
and brush. Eive tons of wood ashes were spread on the large em- 
bankments for the purpose of improving the sod. Wheelock wire 
fencing 300 feet long was erected on the property line between land 
of the Commonwealth and Erancis Fitts, in Newton. 

Concrete conduits have been constructed by the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Company over the aqueduct at the following points: 
One 6-inch x 16-inch conduit, containing two 3-inch ducts, at Worces- 
ter Street in Wellesley, near Dedman's Brook waste-weir, and one 
14-inch x 20-inch conduit, containing four 3-inch ducts, at Worcester 
Street near Wellesley Hills Square. 

The city of Newton began, but has not completed, the laying of a 
24-inch surface-water drain over the aqueduct near Endicott Street, 
Newton Highlands. For a length of about 50 feet iron pipes with 
leaded joints will be used for this work, the remainder being Akron 
pipe. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in service 8,625.5 hours, equivalent to 
359.4 clays. Considerable work has been done in spreading loam, 
seeding and fertilizing the aqueduct embankments. Seventeen tons 
of wood ashes were used for this work. Galvanized iron caps on the 
chimneys at the head-house at the Sudbury Dam, at gaging chamber 
No. 1 and at the four siphon chambers have been replaced by con- 
crete caps, which are expected to be more durable. The house and 
barn at the White place, in Framingham, and the house occupied by 
the attendant at the Weston Reservoir have been painted. 

Pumping Stations. 
Seventy-five per cent, of the water supplied to the Metropolitan 
District has been pumped at the two stations at Chestnut Hill Reser- 



110 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



voir; the remainder was delivered by gravity. The total quantity 
pumped at all of the stations during the year was 35,762,190,000 
gallons, which was 8.7 per cent, less than during the preceding year. 
The cost of operating the stations was $106,902.03, equivalent to 
$2,989 per million gallons pumped, or $0,055 less than the corre- 
sponding cost during the year 1908. The average cost of raising 
1,000,000 gallons of water 1 foot high at all of the stations was 
$0.0349, which is slightly less than the cost during the previous 
year. Coal for use at the several stations has been purchased as fol- 
lows : — 







G 


ross Tons. 




.5 




i 


o . 


d 

o 


02 


a 


a 

O 




Eg 


\A a 


'-+3 




.2 


to 


By whom furnished. 


s '•+? 


r3+» 


a 


>> 
u 


"«? 


to 
o 




^32 




w 


3 
Si 


m 


o 




§.2 

1& 


5.8 

ft u 


o 

Oh 


O 


o 

M 


** to 




0> 5 


a> 3 


o 


CO. 2 




c ^: 




-C m 


~C CO 




a; 43 


ii 


■effl 




o 


o 


GO 


£ 


< 


pw 


Spring Coal Company, bituminous, 


2,001.12* 


_ 


_ 


_ 




$4 19 


Spring Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


1,135.49 


- 


- 


- 


4 06 


Logan Coal Company, bituminous, 


20.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 00 


Spring Coal Company, bituminous, 


2,212.30 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 98 


Maryland Coal and Coke Company, bitumi- 


41.07 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 97 


nous. 
Spring Coal Company, bituminous, 


.. 


1,066.21 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 86 


Bader Coal Company, bituminous, 


36.96 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 85 


C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, . 


1,639.19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 73 


C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthracite, . 


- 


1,362.91 


- 


- 


- 


2 61 


New England Coal and Coke Company, bi- 


- 


- 


400.25 


- 


- 


4 25 


tuminous. 














New England Coal and Coke Company, bi- 


- 


- 


197.47 


- 


- 


4 19 


tuminous. 














Locke Coal Company, screenings, . 


- 


- 


371.61 


- 


- 


2 50 


Locke Coal Company, screenings, . 


- 


- 


108.71 


- 


- 


2 24 


New England Coal and Coke Company, bi- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


160.01 


4 04 


tuminous. 














New England Coal and Coke Company, bi- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


136.91 


3 86 


tuminous. 














Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Com- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


123.40 


2 66 


pany, screenings. 














J. A. Whittemore's Sons, egg, 


- 


- 


- 


101.85 


- 


6 83 


J. A. Whittemore's Sons, furnace, . 


- 


- 


- 


5.35 


- 


6 56 


Metropolitan Coal Company, furnace, . 


- 


- 


- 


95.41 


- 


6 27 


Metropolitan Coal Company, pea, . 


- 


- 


- 


5.36 


- 


5 88 


J. A. Whittemore's Sons, pea, 


- 


- 


- 


. 3.57 


- 


5 88 


Roxbury Coal Company, pea, 


- 


- 


- 


3.57 


- 


5 60 


Metropolitan Coal Company, pea, . 


- 


- 


- 


113.05 


- 


5 04 


Total gross tons, bituminous, . 


4,311.45 


2,201.70 


597.72 


_ 


296.92 


_ 


Total gross tons, anthracite, 


1.639.19 2 


1,362.91 2 


- 


328.16 


- 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite screenings, . 


- 


- 


480.32 


- 


123.40 


- 


Average price per gross ton, bituminous, 


$4 08 


$3 96 


$4 23 


- 


$3 96 


- 


Average price per gross ton, anthracite, 


2 73 2 


2 61 2 


- 


$6 01 


- 


- 


Average price per gross ton, anthracite screen- 


- 


- 


2 44 


- 


2 66 


- 


ings. 















1 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to storage of the coal. 

2 Buckwheat. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



Ill 



Contracts under which bituminous coal has been purchased have 
specified that the coal should contain approximately 14,200 British 
thermal units, 18 to 20 per cent, of volatile matter, 8 per cent, of 
ash and 1 per cent, of sulphur. Coal which when dry contains more 
than 12 per cent, of ash, 23 per cent, of volatile matter or 1.75 per 
cent, of sulphur is subject to rejection. 

Payments for the coal have been made on the basis of the price 
bid, corrected for variation in the heating value and percentage of 
ash, as determined by samples of the coal delivered, an addition 
being made in cases where the number of British thermal units has 
exceeded 14,200 and a deduction when the number has fallen below 
14,000, or the amount of ash has exceeded 9 per cent. A deduction 
has also been made when the amount of moisture in the coal as re- 
ceived has exceeded 4 per cent. The average results of the tests of 
bituminous coals are given in the following table, including coal 
purchased for both the Water and Sewerage Works. The quality 
of the coal received has in general been better than was received dur- 
ing the previous year. 



Kind of Coal. 


Number 

of Samples 

tested. 


British 

Thermal 

Units. 


Percentage 

of Volatile 

Matter. 


Percentage 
of Ash. 


Percentage 

of 
Moisture. 


Davis, 

Vulcan, 

New River, 

Pocahontas, 

Java Mine, 

Georges Creek, .... 


99 
83 
14 
11 
6 
4 


14,356 
14,577 
14,800 
14,804 
13,949 
14,279 


21.91 
20.75 
21.60 
18.89 
16.49 
19.14 


6.97 
6.29 
5.20 
5.42 
10.34 
7.12 


2.39 

2.57 
3.17 
2.43 
2.73 
2.67 



Chestnut Hill High-service Station. 

At this station water is pumped for use in the high-service dis- 
trict of Boston, the city of Quincy and the towns of Watertown, Bel- 
mont and Milton. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



112 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), .... 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 
Average lift (feet), 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, .... 

Small supplies, 

Totals, 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



1,321.95 

3,622,000 

2,124,272 

622.31 

120.04 

$3,549 10 

3,480 07 

286 75 

96 14 

89 95 



$7,502 01 

$5.6750 
.0473 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



1,404.59 

3,848,000 

1,565,681 

897.11 

127.84 

$3,169 64 

2,690 74 

502 10 

85 86 

80 34 



$6,528 68 

$4.6480 
.0364 



10,708.46 

29,338,000 

8,625,393 

1,241.50 

130.25 

$15,602 64 

14,683 81 

1,343 39 

422 65 

395 47 



$32,447 96 

$3.0300 
.0233 



Totals for 
Station. 



13,435.00 

36,808,000 

12,315,346 

1,090.92 

129.02 

$22,321 38 

20,854 62 

2,132 24 

604 65 

565 76 



$46,478 65 

$3.4600 
.0268 



The daily average quantity pumped was 781,000 gallons less than 
the corresponding amount for the previous year. 

No extensive repairs have been required on the machinery at 
this station. A new valve seat has been placed in the suction cham- 
ber on the intermediate pump on engine No. 3, to replace an old 
seat which had been cracked for several years. The plungers of this 
engine were also cleaned and repacked. The valve gear on engine 
No. 4 was repaired and adjusted and a new valve stem fitted on the 
high-pressure cylinder. The coal-hoisting winch has been moved 
from the small building at the rear of the station and set up in a 
corner of the boiler room. This change improves the appearance of 
the plant and decreases the cost of maintenance. 

A Fairbanks railroad track scale of 100 tons capacity was in- 
stalled in April in the side-track at the rear of the high-service sta- 
tion, and has been used since May 8 for weighing all coal received 
at both the high and low service stations. The scale platform is 40 
feet long x 7% ^ ee t wide, and the foundations and the side walls 
of the scale pit are all of Portland cement concrete. The total cost 
of installing the scale was $1,486.03. The cost of changes in the side- 
track made necessary by setting the scale, including necessary repairs, 
was $227.71. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



113 



Chestnut Hill Low-service Station. 

The daily average quantity pumped at this station was 11.9 per 
cent, less, and the cost of operation was 9.7 per cent, less, than during 
the previous year, but the cost per million gallons pumped to the 
reservoir was $0,047 more than during the year 1908, for the reason 
that the reduction in the quantity pumped was greater than that in 
the cost of operation. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 



Average 



lift (feet) 



Engines 
Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

19,183,420,000 
. 52,557,000 

7,160,584 
2,679 

45.82 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, . $18,709 35 

Fuel, 11,239 49 

Kepairs, 949 13 

Oil, waste and packing, . 619 28 

Small supplies, 654 48 



Total for station, $32,171 73 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



$1.6770 
.0366 



The wire glass in the tops of the skylights in the engine and boiler 
rooms, which was badly cracked, has been replaced with rough plate 
glass % of an inch in thickness, for the sum of $375. Glass of the 
same kind has been purchased to be used in replacing the glass in the 
vertical windows. The brick facing of the inner side of the roof 
parapet wall has been coated with antiaquatine, a colorless water- 
proofing liquid, for the purpose of preventing the spalling off of 
pieces of brick from the face of the wall. The interior of the equalizer 
tank was repainted by Sylvester Brothers for the sum of $135. The 
iron of the tank was thoroughly cleaned and then painted with a coat 
of red lead in boiled linseed oil and two coats of Gilsonite varnish. 



114 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc 



Spot Pond Station. 
The following are statistics relating to operations at this station : — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily averag*e quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 8 operated (hours), . 

Engine No. 9 operated (hours), . 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 8 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 9 (gallons), 



2,693,510,000 

7.380,000 

2,424,886 

1,111.00 

129.76 

319 

3,174 

. 138,560,000 

2,554,950,000 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $8,971 71 

Fuel, 3,841 16 

Repairs, . . 686 99 

Oil, waste and packing, ........ 235 03 

Small supplies, .......... 313 97 



Total for station, $14,048 86 






Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



$5.2160 
.0402 






The quantity of water pumped at this station shows a reduction 
of 11.4 per cent, as compared with the previous year, and was less 
than the amount pumped in any year since 1900. This was due to a 
large reduction in the use of water in Melrose, Medford, Winthrop 
and Swampscott, caused by the general introduction of meters during 
the past two years. The total cost of operating the station was 
slightly less than during the previous year, but the cost per million 
gallons pumped to the reservoir was $0,474 greater, due to a reduc- 
tion in the quantity pumped without any reduction in the cost of 
labor. 

Arlington Pumping Station. 

At this station was pumped all the water supplied to the town of 
Lexington, to the high-service district of the town of Arlington, and, 
after November 18, to a few houses in the town of Belmont. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



115 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), . 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 10 operated (hours), . 

Engine No. 11 operated (hours), . 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 10 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 11 (gallons), 



241,310,000 

661,000 

943,480 

255.76 

284 

6,405 

727 

222,560,000 

18,750,000 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $5,177 75 

Fuel, 1,509 90 

Repairs, 566 28 

Oil, waste and packing, 110 97 

Small supplies, 461 42 

Total for station, $7,826 32 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $32.4330 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, ..... .1142 

There was a reduction of 13.8 per cent, in the quantity pumped 
and 14.4 per cent, in the cost of operation at this station as compared 
with the previous year. 

Changes have been made in the jacket piping on the Allis-Chalmers 
engine and a feed-water heater has been placed in the flue between 
the boiler and the chimney, both of which have increased the efficiency 
of the plant. 

During the month of March a Winslow recording gage was placed 
in the station for the purpose of indicating and recording electrically 
the elevation of the water in the standpipe on Arlington Heights. 



West Roxbury Pumping Station. 

At this station water was pumped for supplying the higher por- 
tions of West Roxbury and Milton. The district in Milton was en- 
larged on October 22 by extending, the higher service to about 70 
water takers located on Canton Avenue, Highland, Reed and Spoflord 
streets and Randolph Avenue. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this sta- 
tion : — 



116 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Pumps operated 7,263 hours; average, 20 hours per day. 

Daily average quantity of water pumped (gallons), . . . 572,000 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), . . . 2,001 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 286.05 

Average lift (feet), 137 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $3,908 58 

Fuel, 2,009 27 

Repairs, ............ 256 52 

Oil, waste and packing, ......... 73 73 

Small supplies, 128 37 

Total for station, $6,376 47 

Cost per million gallons pumped, ....... $30.5170 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, ..... .2228 

On account of the small storage capacity of the West Roxbury 
standpipe, the pumps in this station have at times during the past 
few years been taxed to their full capacity, and in order that 
there might be less danger of a failure of the supply the capacity 
of the station has been increased by the addition of a pumping en- 
gine and boiler. A compound duplex Knowles pumping engine of 
1,750,000 gallons capacity, which was formerly used by the city of 
Melrose at Spot Pond, has been installed in a one-story addition, 9 
feet 8 inches wide X 23 feet 4 inches long, which has been built on 
the west side of the pumping station, and a 60-inch diameter vertical 
boiler has been added to the boiler plant. The pump was thoroughly 
repaired and strengthened to adapt it to changed conditions, and the 
plungers were reduced from 12 inches to 11% inches in diameter and 
fitted with new sleeves. The boiler, furnished by the Hodge Boiler 
Works of East Boston, is 60 inches in diameter, having %G-mch steel 
shell, i/^-inch tube sheets and contains 208 2-inch Speller ized steel 
tubes 7 feet 6 inches long. The boiler is fitted with a Gardner shaking 
grate. The work of repairing the engine, erecting the engine and 
boiler and doing the necessary piping both inside and outside the 
building was done by the maintenance force of the department. The 
cost of the work was $5,782.94, divided as follows: — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



117 



Addition to building, .... 

60-inch vertical boiler, flue and grate, 

Worthington surface condenser, 

Refitting and strengthening pump, 

New suction and discharge pipes and connections, 

Teaming pump, 

Labor, setting up engine and boiler, piping, grading, etc., 
Steam and feed water piping, boiler and pipe covering, 
Enlargement of shed, repairs and changes in fire room, . 



$1,720 


00 


824 50 


505 


00 


315 


13 


510 


82 


60 


00 


1,150 


03 


652 


25 


45 


21 



$5,782 94 



Consumption of Water. 

The daily average quantity of water consumed in the 18 munici- 
palities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during the 
year 1909, as measured by meters, was 119,119,100 gallons, equal to 
123 gallons per inhabitant in the district supplied. In addition to 
the above, 94,900 gallons daily were supplied to the United States 
Government reservation on Peddock's island, and 16,300 gallons 
daily to a small portion of the town of Saugus. The daily average 
quantity supplied to the Metropolitan Water District, as determined 
by pump measurement and by the flow in the Weston Aqueduct and 
the estimated yield of Spot Pond, was 119,386,000 gallons, equal to 
123.7 gallons per inhabitant. The excess difference of 155,700 gal- 
lons per day between the quantity delivered by the aqueducts and 
that measured by meters to the several municipalities is due to dif- 
ferences in methods of measurement, to leakage from the Metropolitan 
Water Works reservoirs and pipes, and to the use of water at the 
Chestnut Hill and Spot Pond pumping stations. 

The daily average consumption of water in each of the cities and 
towns supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the years 1908 
and 1909, as measured by meters, was as follows : — 



118 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









Daily Average 


Consumption. 






Estimated 
Popula- 
tion, 

1909. 
















1908. 


1909. 


In- 
crease 
in 
Gallons. 


De- 




Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Gallons. 


Gallons : 

per 
Capita. 


crease 

in 
Gallons. 


Boston, 


632,960 


98,379,300 


15S 


94,029,900 


149 


- 


4,349,400 


Somerville, . 




75,440 


6,589,200 


89 


6,331,000 


84 


- 


258,200 


Maiden, 




41,280 


1,868,600 


46 


1,848,500 


45 


- 


20,100 


Chelsea, 




33,600 


3,316,900 


104 


2,869,400 


85 


- 


447,500 


Everett, 




33,280 


2,636,300 


S2 


2,641,300 


79 


5,000 


- 


Quincy, 




31,440 


3,003,600 


99 


2,919,000 


93 


- 


84,600 


Medford, 




21,890 


2,069,000 


97 


1,732,300 


79 


- 


336,700 


Melrose, 




15,350 


1,351,900 


89 


962,300 


63 


- 


389,600 


Revere, 




14,830 


1,276,300 


89 


1,250,700 


84 


- 


25,600 


Watertown, 




12,630 


732,000 


60 


755,300 


60 


23,300 


- 


Arlington, . 




10,700 


971,200 


93 


861,300 


81 


- 


109,900 


Milton, 




7,800 


331,600 


44 


313,200 


40 


- 


18.400 


Winthrop, . 




9,140 


928,700 


118 


877,600 


96 


- 


51,100 


Stoneham, . 




6,750 


626,000 


94 


575,200 


85 


- 


50,800 


Belmont, 




5,000 


365,400 


78 


310,100 


62 


- 


55,300 


Lexington, . 




4,870 


328,800 


71 


329,400 


68 


600 


- 


Nahant, 




1,860 


140,100 


75 


124,400 


67 


- 


15,700 


Swampscott, 




6,670 


509,300 


78 


388,200 


58 


_ 


121,100 


District, 


965,490 


125,424,200 


133 


119,119,100 


123 


- 


6,305,100 



The consumption in the several districts was as follows 



Gallons 
per Day. 



Decrease | Pereent- 
( Gallons ' age of 
per Day), j Decrease. 



Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, 


48,335,600 


2,978,000 


5.80 


Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts of 
Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston, ....... 


26,531,500 


2,043,200 


7.15 


Southern high-service district, embracing the high-service districts 
of Boston, Quincy, Watertown, Belmont, and a portion of Milton, 


35,629,400 


174,700 


0.49 


Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston, ........... 


7,393,800 


936,800 


11.25 


Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of West Roxbury and Milton, ....... 


572,500 


67,100 


10.49 


Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington, 


656,300 


105,300 


13.83 


Totals 


119,119,100 


6,305,100 


5.03 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



119 



With the exception of the city of Everett and the towns of Water- 
town and Lexington, every municipality in the ^Metropolitan Dis- 
trict used less water in 1909 than in 1908, and in all except 
Watertown the per capita use was less. The daily average use in 
the whole District was 6,305,100 gallons, or 5.03 per cent, less than 
during the preceding year, and the per capita use was less than in any 
year since 1903. 

During January the daily average consumption was 2,049,100 
gallons more than during the corresponding month in 1908, while in 
February there was a reduction of 13,900,500 gallons per day as 
compared with the corresponding month during the previous year. 
This was largely due to the fact that the average temperature for 
the month was 31.6 degrees, as compared with 25.7 degrees in Feb- 
ruarv, 1908, and illustrates verv forciblv the use or waste of water 
to prevent freezing. During every month with the exception of Jan- 
uary the consumption was less than during the previous year, and 
for the last seven months of the year the average reduction was 7,700,- 
000 gallons per day. The reduction in the quantity used is due in 
great measure to the increased use of water meters, and to other 
measures taken to prevent the waste of water. The absence of long- 
continued cold weather during the winter, or hot, dry weather during 
the summer, and the use of oil in place of water for street sprinkling, 
have also been contributing causes. 

The effect of the general introduction of meters upon the use of 
water is illustrated by the reduction which has been effected during 
the past few years by the introduction of meters in AEedford. Melrose, 
Swampscott and Winthrop. 





Per Capita Coxs 

Gallons 


niPTiox 


PiEDrCTIOX IX 

Two Years. 


Per Cext. of 
Services metered. 




1907. 




1908. 


1909. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Per 

Cent. 


Januarv, 
1907. 


] anuazy, 

1910." 


Medford, .... 


105 




97 


79 


26 


24. S 


10.4 


56.1 


Melrose, .... 


US 




S9 


63 


56 


- " 


3.9 


100.0 


Swampscott. 


74 




7> 


5S 


16 


21.6 




97.1 


Winthrop, .... 


117 




US 


96 


21 


17.9 


2.3 


66.1 



In Melrose the metering of services was practically finished in 
190 S. while in Winthrop but comparatively few meters were set until 
the past year. 



120 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The diagram facing this page shows graphically the average daily 
consumption and the rate of consumption between the hours of 1 and 
4 a.m. in the District supplied by the Metropolitan Works for each 
week during the years 1908 and 1909. The amount of rainfall and 
the average temperature for each week, as observed at the Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir, are also shown. It will be noted that the weeks of 
highest consumption correspond with the weeks of low temperature 
during the winter and of high temperature and low rainfall during 
the summer. A rainfall of 2.8 inches during the week ending August 
21 resulted in a reduction of about 9,000,000 gallons in the daily 
average consumption of water during the following week. The dia- 
gram also shows graphically that the reduction in the night rate was 
substantially the same as the reduction during the whole twenty-four 
hours. The high night rates during the weeks ending August 7 and 
14 were due to allowing hand hose and lawn sprinklers to run con- 
tinuously throughout the night during a hot and dry period. 

Metering of Service Pipes. 

Chapter 424 of the Acts of the year 1907 provides that after De- 
cember 31, 1907, all cities and towns which derive their water from 
the Metropolitan Works shall equip all new service pipes with water 
meters, and shall also annually equip with meters 5 per cent, of the 
services which were unmetered on that date. During the past year 
all cities and towns in the District, with the exception of Quincy, have 
set meters on not less than 5 per cent, of the number of service pipes 
which were unmetered on December 31, 1907, and have also metered 
all new services where the premises to be supplied have been occupied. 
The city of Boston did not comply with the requirements of the Act 
in the year 1908. Only 98 meters were set on 1,177 new service pipes 
installed in Boston during that year, and the number of meters set 
on old services during the two years is 3,289 less than the 10 per cent, 
required by the Act. With these two exceptions all cities and towns 
in the District have set during the past two years meters on not less 
than 10 per cent, of the services in use on December 31, 1907, and 
have set meters on all new services connected with premises which 
have been occupied. 

The following table gives the statistics relative to the setting of 
meters and the number of service pipes and meters connected with 
the distributing pipes in the District on December 31, 1909: — 



Average Rate of Consumption 

in 
Metropolitan Water District 

AND 

RAINFALL and AVERAGE TEMPERATURE of AIR at CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR 

FOR 

EACH WEEK DURING 1909 



Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Die. 

2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 I 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 II 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 11 19 25 




2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 I 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 II 18 25 2 3 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 II 18 25 

Jan. Feb Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

Average Rate of Consumption for each week, thus V/////A 

■» between I and 4 A.M. for each week, thus 

Averages in 1908 shown in Red. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



City or Town. 


Number of Meters re- 
quired to be set on Old 
Services Each Year. 


Meters set on 
Old Services. 


Is 

■+3 

TO 

.9 

to 

<D 
t> 

'> 
It 

DQ . 

OS 


a> 

So 
aji-i 

TO TO 
CD U 
O CD 

> CD 

cdS 


1 

a 

as 
o 

CD 

Q 

CD 
TO 

.32 

TO _T 

> §3 

*" _Q 


u 

CD 

.£2 

a 

o> 

o 

Q 

CD 
tn 

.s§ 

<z>2 

O) . 
©CO 


TO » 

O C<5 

cog 

CD 
«- O 
O CD 

A 

a 73 




1908. 


1909. 


Per C 

metei 
1909. 


Boston, 


4,438 


84 


5,503 


1,151 


1,081 


96,132 


11,690 


12.16 


Somerville, 




411 


732 


621 


211 


201 


12,018 


5,147 


42.83 


Maiden, 




14 


43 


62 


171 


85 


7,303 


6,978 


95.55 


Chelsea, 




240 


198 


756 


99 


91 


6,613 


2,212 


33.45 


Everett, 




252 


338 


255 


81 


84 


5,320 


843 


15.85 


Quincy, 




230 


358 


33 


365 


61 


6,814 


2,032 


29.82 


Medford, 




179 


857 


927 


108 


110 


4,624 


2,594 


56.10 


Melrose, 




119 


2,432 


135 


43 


59 


3,510 


3,510 


100.00 


Revere, 




138 


85 


184 


193 


114 


3,214 


590 


18.36 


Watertown, 




- 


- 


- 


54 


54 


1,973 


1,973 


100.00 


Arlington, 




55 


108 


56 


56 


73 


2,032 


1,121 


55.16 


Milton, . 




- 


- 


- 


52 


52 


1,380 


1,380 


100.00 


Winthrop, 




100 


213 


975 


103 


151 


2,320 


1,533 


66.08 


Stoneham, 




65 


116 


225 


31 


31 


1,447 


430 


29.72 


Belmont, 




- 


- 


- 


48 


48 


883 


883 


100.00 


Lexington, 




32 


113 


70 


42 


47 


780 


362 


46.41 


Nahant, 




16 


30 


40 


8 


8 


398 


179 


44.98 


Swampscott, 




21 


264 


142 


47 


47 


1,439 


1,398 


97.15 


Totals, 


6,310 


5,971 


9,984 


2,863 


2,397 


158,200 


44,855 


28.35 



1 The number of new meters installed and the number of new services equipped with meters seldom 
agree exactly for the reason that service pipes are installed but meters are not set until the buildings 
are permanently occupied. 

At the end of the year 28.35 per cent, of all the service pipes in 
the District were metered, as compared with 21.5 per cent, at the 
beginning of the year. In 6 municipalities all of the services are 
now metered, and, excluding Boston, 53.4 per cent, of the services 
were metered at the end of the year. 

Quality of the Water. 

About 5.7 per cent, of the water used in the Metropolitan District 
was drawn from Lake Cochituate, 2 per cent, from Framingham 
Reservoir ~No. 2, 67.7 per cent, from Eramingham Reservoir 'No. 3 
and 24.6 per cent, from the Sudbury Reservoir. Nearly 90 per cent. 



122 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc 

of the water drawn from the Sudbury and Framingham No. 3 res- 
ervoirs was supplied to those reservoirs from the Wachusett Reser- 
voir through the Wachusett Aqueduct. 

Early in the year a growth of the microscopic diatom Asterionella 
developed in the Wachusett Reservoir. The numbers of the organism 
gradually increased, and as the water from the Wachusett Reservoir 
was delivered into the Sudbury and Framingham No. 3 reservoirs 
growths of the organism appeared in those reservoirs, and early in 
March were present in the water delivered to the consumers in suf- 
ficient numbers to cause complaints of a geranium taste and odor. 
At this time the number of the organism in each cubic centimeter 
of water was about 10,000. During March and April and until the 
middle of May the organism continued to increase in numbers, the 
maximum number in the Wachusett and Sudbury reservoirs being 
about 27,500 per cubic centimeter, and in the water drawn from the 
taps about 25,000. From the first of April until the middle of June 
the water drawn from the taps, with the exception of that supplied 
from Spot Pond to the northern high-service district, had a very 
disagreeable taste and odor. 

Although this organism is generally present in all of our reservoirs 
in small numbers, it has never previously appeared in sufficient 
numbers to cause any noticeable taste and odor, and it has seldom 
caused trouble elsewhere, except in places where ground waters have 
been stored in open reservoirs or tanks and exposed to the light. 
Under these conditions the organism develops in large numbers, and 
it has been found necessary to cover reservoirs in which water is 
stored which has been taken from wells or filter-galleries. 

The growth of Asterionella in the Wachusett Reservoir during 
the past year has been exceptional in that so large a number should 
grow in a surface water, and also in that the organism continued to 
increase in numbers through the winter. After July 1 the water 
delivered to the District was unobjectionable for the remainder of the 
year. 

Samples of the water have been collected monthly from 24 points 
and semimonthly from 5 points on the works, and sent to the State 
Board of Health for chemical analysis. Samples of water have also 
been collected weekly at 35 points and biweekly at 8 points, and ex- 
amined microscopically and for color, odor, taste and turbidity in 






No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



the biological laboratory of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board. 

The following table gives a comparison of the average results of 
the examinations of water from a tap in Boston for the years 1901 
to 1909, inclusive : — 





1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


State Board of Health Ex- 




















aminations. 




















Color (Nessler standard), 


0.24 


0.26 


0.25 


0.23i 


0.24 1 


0.241 


0.22i 


0.191 


0.181 


Total residue, . 


4.43 


3.93 


3.98 


3.93 


3.86 


3.86 


3.83 


3.50 


3.46 


Loss on ignition, 


1.64 


1.56 


1.50 


1.59 


1.59 


1.39 


1.40 


1.35 


1.43 


Free ammonia, 


0.0013 


0.0016 


0.0013 


0.0023 


0.0020 


0.0018 


0.0013 


0.0011 


0.0011 


^SSlS&ved.: 


0.0158 


0.0139 


0.0125 


0.0139 


0.0145 


0.0159 


0.0129 


0.0115 


0.0128 


0.0143 


0.0119 


0.0110 


0.0121 


0.0124 


0.0134 


0.0109 


0.0092 


0.0103 


ammonia, [ suspendedi 


0.0015 


0.0020 


0.0015 


0.0018 


0.0021 


0.0025 


0.0020 


0.0024 


0.0025 


Chlorine, .... 


0.30 


0.29 


0.30 


0.34 


0.35 


0.34 


0.33 


0.33 


0.28 


Nitrogen as nitrates, 


0.0173 


0.0092 


0.0142 


0.0110 


0.0083 


0.0054 


0.0068 


0.0092 


0.0034 


Nitrogen as nitrites, 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0000 


Oxygen consumed, . 


0.42 


0.40 


0.39 


0.37 


0.35 


0.36 


0.32 


0.26 


0.25 


Hardness, 


1.7 


1.3 


1.5 


1.5 


1.4 


1.3 


1.3 


1.2 


1.3 


Metropolitan Water and 




















Sewerage Board Exami- 




















nations. 




















Color (platinum standard), 


34 


33 


35 


32 


28 


25 


27 


22 


23 


Turbidity, 


2.0 


2.3 


2.2 


2.4 


1.9 


2.2 


2.2 


2.4 


2.6 


Total organisms, 


243 


367 


286 


303 


528 


550 


427 


695 


1,959 


Amorphous matter, 


38 


34 


36 


36 


37 


42 


47 


64 


97 


Bacteria, .... 


162 


164 


126 


176 


231 


154 


176 


148 


195 



Note. — Chemical analyses are in parts per 100,000, organisms and amorphous matter in standard 
units per cubic centimeter, and bacteria in number per cubic centimeter. The standard unit has an 
area of 400 square microns, and by its use the number of diatomacese are decreased, and the number of 
chlorophyceae and cyanophyceae are very much increased, as compared with the number of organisms. 

i Platinum standard. 

In the biological laboratory there have been made 2,471 micro- 
scopical and 1,072 bacterial examinations, of water collected at 
various points upon the works. Of the microscopical examinations 
1,953 were of the regular weekly and biweekly samples and 518 were 
special examinations. 

The bacteriological work consisted of routine weekly examinations 
of the main feeders of the Sudbury Reservoir, of Framingham Reser- 
voir No. 3 and of Lake Cochituate, and monthly tests of the effi- 
ciency of the Pegan Brook, Marlborough Brook and Sterling filter- 
beds. Special work was done in connection with the growth of 
Asterionella, including determinations of the amount of dissolved 
oxygen and carbon dioxide in the different reservoirs. 

The water of the Wachusett Reservoir, as has been previously 
stated, contained a very large growth of Asterionella during the 
early part of the year, continuing until about the middle of June. 



124 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

During October there was a small growth of Synura at the upper 
end of the reservoir, but the water as drawn from the reservoir at 
the dam during the last six months of the year was of excellent qual- 
ity and low in color. 

As over 90 per cent, of the water drawn from the Sudbury and 
Framingham No. 3 reservoirs was received from the Wachusett 
Reservoir the organisms in all of these reservoirs were generally 
similar in species and of equal numbers. In the Marlborough arm 
of the Sudbury Reservoir a growth of Dinobryon was present from 
October until the end of the year.. The water at the dam contained 
a maximum of 1,043 units on November 9, and the organism caused 
the water to have an objectionable odor for about seven weeks. 

At the Whitehall Reservoir there was a growth of Synura for 
two or three weeks in February, the maximum number observed being 
1,230, on February 8. The color of the water ranged from 82 to 64. 

The number of organisms in the Hopkinton and Ashland reser- 
voirs was small and their character unobjectionable. The color of 
the water at the Hopkinton Reservoir ranged from 86 to 48 and at 
the Ashland Reservoir from 92 to 54. In September there were 
indications of stagnation in the water at the bottom of the Ashland 
Reservoir, the color at the surface being 60 and at the bottom 92. 
The dissolved oxygen in the water at the bottom of the reservoir at 
this time was but 1.9 per cent, of saturation. 

In Framingham Reservoir No. 2 there were no growths of organ- 
isms to cause disagreeable tastes or odors. The observed color 
varied from 120 to 46. 

At Lake Cochituate Chlamydomonas was present in the water 
in sufficient numbers to make the water objectionable for drinking 
purposes from the beginning of the year until June 1, and from 
September 20 to the end of the year. Dinobryon was also present 
in the water in November. There were 660 units per cubic centi- 
meter of Uroglena in the water at the southerly end of the lake in 
March, and 500 units in June, but none was observed at the north- 
erly end of the lake, from which the water is taken. A growth of 
Asterionella developed in November and December, reaching a maxi- 
mum of 3,040 units on December 6. The color of the surface 
samples ranged during the year from 35 to 20. 

In the Weston Reservoir Asterionella was present during the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 125 

early part of the year and until June, with a maximum of 11,000 
units on May 11, and Dinobryon was present in November and 
December, with a maximum of 1,330 units on November 9. In 
both cases the growths occurred at the same time as similar growths 
in the Sudbury Reservoir, from which the Weston Reservoir is 
supplied. 

The principal organisms in the Waban Hill Reservoir were As- 
terionella from January until June, with a maximum of 9,700 units 
early in May; Uroglena, which caused a disagreeable odor, in the 
latter part of May; and Dinobryon, which gave the water a fishy 
odor, during the latter part of November. 

The water in Spot Pond contained Asterionella during the early 
part of the year, but the numbers present were not large enough to 
give an objectionable taste to the water, except for six weeks in 
April and May. Uroglena was present in small numbers, but only 
once, on June 7, in sufficient numbers to give a noticeable odor to 
the water. Dinobryon was present in small numbers from October 
to the end of the year. The average color of the water was 16. 

The waters of the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs contained the 
same organisms, in substantially the same numbers, as Spot Pond. 

Uroglena was present in the Forbes Hill Reservoir with 5,200 
units in April, and again in December with 4,630 units, and in the 
Mystic Reservoir during the first five months of the year. 

The growth of Asterionella was so general in all of the reservoirs 
from which it was necessary to draw the supply of the District 
that the water drawn from the taps in all portions of the Metropolitan 
District, with the exception of the northern high-service district, 
which is supplied from Spot Pond, had an objectionable taste and 
odor from about March 1 to July 1. Other objectionable growths 
were prevented from reaching the consumers by isolating the reser- 
voirs while the waters were not suitable for use. 

In August complaints were received from a small district in Mil- 
ton of the presence of organisms of considerable size in the water as 
drawn from the taps. The organisms proved to be Planaria 
Maculata, a flat worm, and Acellus Aquaticus, belonging among 
the Crustacea. As they could not be found elsewhere, it is supposed 
that they were breeding in the local distributing pipes. 

In Appendix No. 4, tables Nos. 26 to 32,* are given the results of 



126 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

chemical examinations of the water made by the State Board of 
Health, and in tables E"os. 33 and 34 the average number of organisms 
and bacteria in the water during each of the past twelve years. 

Sanitary Inspection. 

A force varying from 3 to 15 men has been employed to patrol 
the several reservoirs for the purpose of detecting any violations of 
the regulations of the Board relative to boating, fishing, hunting 
and polluting the water or injuring the property of the Common- 
wealth. 

On the Wachusett watershed 9 cases of typhoid fever and 1 of 
dysentery were reported, all from the town of Holden, and with 
the exception of 2 cases, which occurred at the Mount Pleasant 
Hotel, all cases occurred in houses not supplied with water from a 
public water supply. An epidemic of typhoid fever originated 
among the 600 guests at the Mount Pleasant House, in Holden, on 
Labor Day, September 6, which is reported to have resulted in 59 
cases and 8 deaths. With 2 exceptions these cases developed outside 
the watershed. Investigation by the State Board of Health showed 
that the epidemic was caused by the contamination of the milk used 
at the hotel by a waitress avIio was suffering from the disease in a 
mild form. 

On the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 5 cases of typhoid 
fever were reported from Marlborough, 5 from Westborough, 2 
from Ashland, 6 from South Framingham and 1 from Natiek, mak- 
ing a total of 19, as compared with 24 during the year 1908. In 9 
of these cases the patients resided in houses connected with the 
public sewers, which discharge outside the watershed. In all cases 
precautions were taken to protect the water supply from danger of 
pollution. 

The sanitary conditions on the Wachusett watershed have been 
improved by the removal of 5 buildings, 4 of which were on property 
belonging to the Board, and by the construction of 7 cesspools. 
Twenty new buildings were built on the watershed during the year, 
16 of which were provided with cesspools to receive the drainage. 
The Dawson and Woods mills at Holden have not been operated 
during the past year, and as a result the number of persons residing 
in the tenements on the mill properties was 124 less than during the 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



previous year. On the other hand, a larger force has been employed 
in the mills at Jeffersonville, and the population in the mill tene- 
ments at this point has increased from 151 to 228. 

On the Sudbury watershed 44 old and 14 new premises were con- 
nected with the public sewers, which convey the drainage outside the 
watershed. Mr. Waldo Fay constructed on the grounds of his private 
school in Southborough a cesspool 5 feet x 6 feet x 125 feet in 
length, to receive and care for the overflow from the old cesspool, 
which had failed to care for the drainage from the school buildings. 

On the Cochituate watershed 33 old and 29 new premises were 
connected with the public sewers. 

In the four places on the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 
which have systems of sewerage conveying the drainage outside the 
watersheds, there were on December 31, 1909, 3,722 premises con- 
nected with the sewers and 169 premises not yet connected on streets 
where there are existing sewers, as follows : — 



Premises 

connected with 

Sewers. 



Premises not 

connected with 

Sewers. 



Marlborough, 
Westborough, 
Framingham, 
Natick, . 
Totals, 




During the year a number of persons were apprehended in viola- 
tion of the regulations of the Board. Forty-eight persons were ap- 
prehended for violations of fishing regulations. Eleven of these were 
summoned into court and 6 of them were fined. Sixteen men and 
boys were discovered bathing in the reservoirs. Five of these were 
summoned into court and 2 were fined. 

The cutting of ice at Framingham reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3, the 
Sudbury and Whitehall reservoirs, and Dudley and Waushacum 
ponds has been inspected to see that the work was done in such a 
way as not to pollute the water supply. 

A summary of the work of sanitary inspection for the year 1909 
is given in the following tables. The first table shows for the Wa- 



128 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

chusett watershed the number of premises inspected, the classification 
of cases inspected and the condition of the premises at the end of 
the year; the second table gives the corresponding information for 
the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds. 

The headings of these tables are easily understood, except in a 
few instances : under the heading " Premises Vacant " are included 
all cases which at present furnish no objectionable drainage, but 
which might furnish such drainage if the premises were occupied; 
under the heading " Unsatisfactory " are included all cases where 
it is possible that under the most unfavorable conditions drainage 
from privies or sinks may reach a water course, all suspected cases 
and all cases of manufacturing wastes entering feeders, even though 
there may have been some attempt at previous purification. This 
class is about 3% per cent, of the total number of premises. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



129 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



131 



Swamp Ditches and Brooks. 

The drainage ditches in swamps on the several watersheds, ag- 
gregating 36.36 miles in length, have been cleaned, and the weeds 
and brush mowed and burned for a width of 10 to 20 feet on either 
side of the ditches. Four wooden dams or bulkheads forming two set- 
tling basins at the outlet of the ditches leading from Crane Swamp 
and a small swamp about 300 feet below the upper dam into the open 
channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct have been replaced by concrete 
bulkheads 8 inches thick, provided with grooves for stop-planks to con- 
trol the elevation of the water. A new settling basin has been con- 
structed to prevent the washing of sand into the open channel from a 
small brook entering from the north about 600 feet below the terminal 
chamber. The cost of these bulkheads was $393.92. Four bridges 
over ditches on the Sears estate in Southborough discharging into the 
open channel, and two over Broad Meadow Brook and two over 
Angelico Brook discharging into the Sudbury Reservoir, have been 
re-covered with 2-inch chestnut plank. 

Observations of the colors of waters from swamps have been made 
monthly and the results tabulated as follows : — 





Area of 
Water- 
shed 
(Acres). 


Area of 
Swamp 
(Acres). 


Length 

of 
Ditches 
(Feet). 


Colors of Waters (Platinum Standard). 




BEFORE DRAINING. 


AFTER DRAINING. 


SWAMP. 


Averages 

for Years 

1894, 1895, 

1899. 


Averages 

for Years 

1900, 1901, 

1902. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Crane, 
No. 54, 

No. 55, 

No. 76, ... 


1,856 
750 

1,625 
225 


460 
72 

220 
26 


45,250 
8,930 

27,661 
6,173 


195 


90 

127 

44 


77 
53 
80 1 

27 


72 
41 
44 
24 


'64 
33 
36 
20 



Nearly one-half of the ditches in swamp 55 were not built until 1907. 



Protection of Supply. 
In addition to the work of sanitary inspection and the care of the 
SAvamp ditches, which are described elsewhere in this report, the 
work of protecting the supply has included the maintenance and 
operation of filter-beds for the purpose of purifying surface water 
from thickly populated districts before its admission to the storage 
reservoirs. The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, with an area of 



132 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

14 acres, filter the water from about 1.8 square miles in the thickly 
settled portion of the city of Marlborough before its admission to 
the Sudbury Reservoir. These beds were cleaned in June and weeded 
in September and October. With the exception of a small quantity 
of water which overflowed into the reservoir on February 20, the 
entire discharge of the brook was filtered. During 1 day in Feb- 
ruary, 3 days in March, 3 days in April and 2 days in May there 
was a small flow of diluted sewage into the filter-bed near Farm Road, 
which receives the overflow from the Marlborough main sewer during 
freshets, and there was a flow of ground water into the bed at times 
during February, March, April and May. 

The surface drainage from an area of about 1 square mile in the 
thickly settled portion of Natick is collected in a basin and then 
pumped on to filter-beds before entering Lake Cochituate. The pumps 
were operated on 174 days during the year. ' A small quantity of 
unfiltered water overflowed into the lake from the basin on Pegan 
Brook on February 20, and small quantities were wasted from the 
intercepting ditch into the lake on February 10, 20 and 24. The 
total quantity pumped was 251,598,000 gallons, equivalent to a 
daily average of 689,310 gallons. Of the total, 174,605,000 gallons 
were from Pegan Brook and 76,993,000 gallons from the intercepting 
ditch which collects water from the brooks formerly draining into 
Pegan Brook Meadow. The total quantity of coal consumed was 
150,094 pounds, and 1,676 gallons of water were pumped per pound 
of coal. The cost of operating the station, cleaning the filter-beds 
and caring for the grounds was $2,606.47, making the cost per million 
gallons treated $10.36. The filter-beds were cleaned several times 
during the year and the ditches in the receiving reservoir were 
cleaned once. The interior wood and iron work and the exterior 
woodwork of the pumping station were painted. 

The Sterling filter-beds, having an area of 2 acres, receive water 
from the brook draining about 225 acres in the village of Sterling. 
The beds were in continuous operation during the year. On the 
morning of March 25 a heavy rain occurred which filled all four of 
the beds with water. At this time two small slides occurred in the 
southwesterly corner of the embankment of bed No. 3, the larger 
slide being about 30 feet long x 15 feet wide, and the smaller one 
about 10 feet long x 8 feet wide. These slides consisted of the slip- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 133 

ping off of the outside face of the embankment for a thickness of about 
12 inches, which at this time was thoroughly saturated with water. 
The slides were undoubtedly due to the porous character of the ma- 
terial which was placed in the embankments during construction. 
The embankment was repaired and strengthened by excavating a 
trench 10 feet deep, 1% feet wide at the bottom and 3% feet wide 
at the top, through the centre of the embankment for a distance of 
170 feet, and filling the trench with a mixture of loam and clay thor- 
oughly consolidated for a depth of 7 feet, the remaining 3 feet being 
filled with gravel, sand and loam. At the same time a blind drain 
345 feet long was constructed across land of the Commonwealth and 
land of Charles Nixon for the purpose of carrying off water which 
collected on the surface of the ground below the filter-beds. 

The filter-beds which receive the drainage from the Worcester 
County Training School at Oakdale have been operated continuously 
and satisfactorily during the year. The small filter-beds which re- 
ceive the drainage from a few small cottages at Sterling Junction 
were in use from April 23 to November 1, inclusive. 

During the year about 1,000 notices, setting forth certain re- 
strictions and regulations adopted by the Board in connection with 
the protection of the waters and property, have been posted through- 
out the marginal lands of the several reservoirs and along the several 
aqueducts. The notices are 17 inches x 28 inches in size, printed 
on cloth, in letters which can be easily read at a considerable dis- 
tance. The notices at the Wachusett, Sudbury, Hopkinton, Ashland 
and Framingham No. 2 reservoirs and along the open channel of 
the Wachusett Aqueduct are worded as follows, with the exception 
that smoking on the grounds is forbidden about the Wachusett Reser- 
voir : — 



134 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc 

Metropolitan • Water • Works 




»FT EESEHTQ1R 



BOATING 

FISHING WITHOUT A PERMIT 

BUILDING FIRES 
HUNTING 



SNARING 
SMOKING 

ON THE PREMISES OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

AND ANY ACTS TENDING TO 

POLLUTE THE WATERS 

OR 

INJURE THE PROPERTY 

OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

ARE PROHIBITED 

iSi»ihiI) W I I.I.I AM N. DAVENPORT, -S.vrri.iK- 
Mchojiolilaii Water and Sewerage HihiiiI 



I AiUmrtun Place, Motion, Mat. 



At the other reservoirs the notices are similar, but at Spot Pond 
and the Weston Reservoir fishing, picknicking and skating are also 
prohibited, and fishing is not allowed in Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
and the northern division of Lake Cochituate. 

Forestry. 

In connection with the several reservoirs and aqueducts the Board 
has under its care and control about 10,000 acres of land, a large 
jDart of which is covered with trees. Around the Wachusett Reser- 
voir 1,341 acres of land have been planted with white pines during 
the past seven years, and considerable numbers of pines have been 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 135 

planted around the Sudbury Reservoir. There are still several hun- 
dred acres which it is proposed to plant with pines, but the greater 
part of the forestal work now consists in the care of the trees which 
have been planted, the improvement and thinning of forested areas 
and in the care and improvement of the forest roads. 

During the past year an area of 25.7 acres at the Wachusett Res- 
ervoir was planted with three-year-old white pine seedlings placed 
6 feet apart in each direction. There were used in doing this work 
about 36,000 white pine seedlings. When the Wachusett Reservoir 
was constructed two rows of arbor vitas trees were set parallel with and 
25 feet from the shore. A very large proportion of these trees died, 
and during the past season 11.4 miles, or somewhat less than half 
of the shore line, have been replanted with 34,050 arbor vitas trees 
spaced 3 feet apart in rows 2 feet apart, at a cost of about $29 per 
mile. The work of cutting trees and brush which interfered with 
the growth of young pines and the improvement by thinning of older 
hardwood growths has been continued. About 230 acres of young 
white pines were treated in this manner, at a cost of $6.50 per acre, 
and an improvement thinning of about 31 acres of twenty to thirty 
year old white pines and chestnuts was made, at a cost of $28 per 
acre. 

A mature growth of white pines on about 2% acres of land lying 
between Waushacum Street and the west shore of the Stillwater River 
was cut and manufactured into lumber, a portion of which was sold 
and a portion used in the construction of sewage carriers at the 
Clinton sewerage filter-beds. The cost of the labor, teaming and 
millwork in connection with the cutting of this lumber was $1,227.90. 
Lumber and cord wood were sold to the amount of $1,206.75, and 
20,350 feet of 2-inch white pine plank, valued at $712.25, were ob- 
tained for use on the works. 

Trees which were destined to be killed by the permanent raising 
of the level of the water in what are known as the " Lily Ponds," in 
West Boylston, have been cut and worked into lumber and cordwood. 

Maple seedlings have been transplanted from the field to the sides 
of the highway between Clinton and West Boylston and set 35 feet 
apart for a distance of nearly 2 miles. 

The Flagg nursery now contains 23,350 white pines and 19,350 
arbor vita?. In the Lamson nursery there are 58,100 arbor vitas. 



136 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The following table gives information regarding the marginal and 
outlying lands belonging to the Board in the Wachusett watershed : — 



Marginal Lands. 

Area of land which was forested when acquired, not since improved, 

Area of land which was forested when acquired, and since improved, 

Area which has been planted with trees, and not cleared, 

Area which has been planted with trees, and since cleared, 

Area to be planted with trees, ..... 

Area open, which will probably not be planted, . 

Area of marginal strip along shores of reservoir, . 



Acres. 

1,235 
240 
622 

719 

28 

339 

197 

3,380 
Outlying Lands. 
Area of land which was forested when acquired, . . • . . . 294 

Area of land not available to plant, . 295 

Area to be planted with trees, 339 



928 
Total area, 4,308 

The brush and weeds on all forest roads and on highway roadsides 
at the Wachusett Reservoir have been cut and burned. 

Fire patrol service has been maintained throughout the marginal 
lands of the Wachusett Reservoir during the spring and fall of the 
year for the protection of the improved timber and young white pine 
forests. Notwithstanding this precaution three fires occurred in 
the recently planted white pine stands and one in sprout and timber 
land. The fires in the white pine stands burned over 8V2 acres on 
the Bullard farm in West Boylston, 9 acres on Carville Hill and 
5 acres on the Woods farm, both in Clinton, and destroyed 27,200 
white pines, valued at $416. The fourth fire burned over about 50 
acres of land on the Gates farm, covered with a sprout growth of no 
value. Two of the fires were of incendiary origin. Five boys were 
summoned into court for setting these fires, one of whom was fined 
$30 and three others were placed on probation for six months. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir the forestal work has consisted in plant- 
ing 5,000 white pines, cutting out brush and undesirable trees from 
among 20 acres of white pines on Pine Hill and several other points 
around the reservoir. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 137 

At the Ashland Reservoir about 100 white pines were planted on 
the southerly side of the waste-way. Two hundred white pines were 
planted at the Hopkinton Reservoir between the filter-beds and the 
channel of Indian Brook, and 60 on the opposite side of the channel. 
Around Lake Cochituate and along the Sudbury and Cochituate 
aqueducts the forest growth has been improved by cutting out under- 
brush and undesirable trees. 

The work of protecting the trees from the ravages of destructive 
insects has required the expenditure of $8,012.28, distributed as 
follows : — 

Spot Pond, $3,591 05 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 918 41 

Weston Reservoir and Aqueduct, . . ... . . • 1,419 94 

Mystic Lake, pumping 1 station and reservoir, ..... 313 25 

Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts, 310 98 

Lake Cochituate, 176 00 

Sudbury Reservoir, 364 00 

Whitehall Reservoir, 4 81 

Wachusett Reservoir and Aqueduct, gypsy and brown-tail moths, 388 67 

Wachusett Reservoir, pine-tree weevil, ...... 525 17 



$8,012 28 



At Spot Pond six colonies of gypsy moths were discovered on the 
property of the Board and the caterpillars were very plenty adjoin- 
ing the property line between the Board and the city of Medford 
at the south end of the pond. Beginning on June 3 the trees on 
about 13 acres of land were sprayed with 4,850 gallons of a mixture 
of arsenate of lead and water. 

At Chestnut Hill Reservoir the number of gypsy moths was some- 
what larger than during the previous year, due, mainly, to the neg- 
lect of adjoining property owners. 

At the Weston Reservoir and along the aqueduct to the terminal 
chamber the trees have not been injured by the moths, but very care- 
ful attention and' considerable work was required to prevent the cater- 
pillars from entering the property of the Board from the neighboring 
estates, which were badly infested. About 450 pounds of arsenate 
of lead were used in spraying trees on 14 acres. 

There was a large increase in the number of gypsy moths at Lake 



138 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Cochituate, and 4,350 egg clusters were destroyed, as compared with 
300 during the previous year. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir there was a large increase in the number 
of brown-tail moths and several colonies of gypsy moths have been 
recently discovered. The young pines have been also infested with 
the pine-tree weevil, which necessitates cutting off and burning the 
infested shoots. 

At the Wachusett Reservoir the weevil has caused considerable 
injury to the young pines. 

All the areas planted with pines, aggregating 1,341 acres, were 
inspected during the month of July, and the affected shoots cut off 
and burned at a cost of $525.17. The proportion of trees affected 
varied in different localities from 1 in 25 to 1 in 3. 

The nests of the brown-tail moth were removed from trees along 
the open channel, on the grounds at the Wachusett Dam, at the Clin- 
ton sewerage filter-beds and around the upper end of the Wachusett 
Reservoir at West Boylston and Oakdale in about the same numbers 
as during the previous year. 

Distributing Reservoirs. 
The distributing reservoirs maintained by the Board are the Weston 
and Chestnut Hill reservoirs, the Waban Hill and Forbes Hill res- 
ervoirs and the Forbes Hill standpipe of the southern high-service 
system; Spot Pond and the Mystic Reservoir near Tufts College of 
the northern low-service system; the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs 
of the northern high-service system, and the Arlington standpipe of 
the northern extra high-service system. 

Weston Reservoir. 
]STo work has been done at this reservoir other than that required to 
keep the grounds and buildings in good order. A large part of the 
work required has been in connection with the protection of the trees 
and shrubs from the gypsy and brown-tail moths. The reservoir, 
with its buildings and grounds, is in good condition. The attendant's 
house was painted. 






No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 139 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

The buildings and grounds, including the grounds around the two 
pumping stations, have received the usual care and are in good con- 
dition. The cupola of the old effluent gate-house required extensive 
repairs, and as it appeared to serve no useful or ornamental purpose 
has been removed and a stone chimney substituted at the apex of the 
roof. 

Waban Hill Reservoir. 

The outer slope of the reservoir embankments was given a dress- 
ing of fertilizer and the stairway leading to the gate-house was re- 
pointed. The reservoir and grounds are in good condition. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe. 

The woodwork of the standpipe tower was painted during the year. 

The floor of the tower has gradually disintegrated and should be 

resurfaced during the coming year. The reservoir has. been kept full 

of water but has not been drawn upon for the supply of the District. 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 
A foreman and 7 laborers have been employed in operating gates 
controlling the flow of water, cleaning the screens and caring for and 
policing the grounds and buildings at these reservoirs. A 22-foot 
boat, operated by a gasoline engine, has been placed on , Spot Pond 
for use in policing the pond and in driving away the gulls and 
ducks which congregate on the pond in large numbers at some seasons 
of the year. On August 15 an electric car line was placed in service, 
which enables the public to reach the south end of Spot Pond, and 
since that date, especially on Sundays and holidays, the work of 
patrolling the shores of the reservoir in order to protect the property 
of the Board and prevent pollution of the water supply has been 
greatly increased. 

Mystic Reservoir. 
The interior of the gate-house has been painted. The reservoir has 
been used to control the pressure of the water supplied to the town 
of Arlington. 



140 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Mystic Lake and Pumping Station. 
The building formerly occupied by the attendant at the lake has 
been torn down. The exterior woodwork of the old pumping station 
building has been scraped and partially painted. 

Arlington Standpipe. 

The grounds around the standpipe have been cared for by the 
town of Arlington. The standpipe structure has required very little 
attention. The wooden floor of the gallery around the top of the 
standpipe has been oiled and a portion of the ironwork of the stairway 
has been painted. 

Pipe Yards. 

The buildings at Chestnut Hill and Glenwood are in good con- 
dition, with the exception that the exterior woodwork of the build- 
ings at Glenwood will require painting during the coming year. 

Pipe Lines. 

The length of pipe lines owned and operated by the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board was increased by 7.88 miles during the 
year, making the total on December 31, 1909, 92.53 miles. The 
length of mains 4 inches in diameter and larger connected with the 
works but owned and operated by the several cities and towns sup- 
plied with water is 1,602.62 miles. 

Thirty-three leaks have been repaired on the pipe lines maintained 
by the Board, at a cost of $1,540.42, not including sums paid in two 
cases for damages to private property by water which flowed 
from broken pipes. At 2.30 p.m. on May 25 the 48-inch main in 
Franklin Street, Brighton, broke and caused the flooding of property 
in the immediate neighborhood. This break was repaired at a cost 
of $223.83 and $215 were paid on account of damage to property. 
On December 24, at 9.30 p.m., a break occurred in the same 48-inch 
pipe line in Harvard Square, in Cambridge. A section of the pipe 
about 6 feet long and 4 feet wide was blown from the side of the 
pipe, resulting in the escape of. a large volume of water for a period 
of about 1% hours. Many buildings in the vicinity were flooded, 
some of which contained valuable goods. The main was repaired and 
refilled in readiness for use at midnight of the following day. The 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 141 

cost of the repairs was $459.07. The cost of the damage to property 
will approximate $20,000. Of the remaining leaks 23 occurred from 
loosened leaded joints. Two in Pearl Street, Somerville, were caused 
by defective joints on the 30-inch wrought-iron, cement-lined main, 
and two occurred at leaded joints in the 36-inch main crossing the 
Mystic River. One was caused by a defective 48-inch wood joint 
on Beacon Street, in Brookline. 

The abolition of the grade crossing of the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road at Pleasant Street, in Maiden, has necessitated the temporary 
and permanent relocation of the 30-inch high-service main in Pleasant 
Street. In order that the water supply might be maintained without 
interruption in Everett, Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop and other towns 
in the northern high-service district while the lowering of the 
street was in progress, a temporary line of 24-inch pipe about 1,000 
feet long was laid around the site of the work between June 18 and 
July 18, and after the street had been lowered the 30-inch main was 
relaid for a distance of 590 feet and connected with the 30-inch 
pipes at either end. The final connections were made and the tem- 
porary main abandoned on August 22. A considerable portion of 
the labor in connection with excavating and moving the pipes was 
done by the Boston & Maine Railroad. The cost of materials and 
labor furnished by this department was $2,295.66, which is to be 
paid by the Railroad Company as a portion of the cost of abolishing 
the grade crossing. 

The construction of the subway in Massachusetts Avenue, in 
Cambridge, has necessitated the relocation of the 48-inch main be- 
tween Central Square and Norfolk Street. By agreement with the 
Boston Elevated Railway Company, which bears the expense of 
the changes, a new line of 48-inch pipe is to be laid in Prospect and 
Austin streets, crossing over the subway in Central Square. This 
line, which is about 1,200 feet long, will be connected with the ex- 
isting main at the corner of Austin and Norfolk streets and on Mag- 
azine Street, and the present pipe in Massachusetts Avenue and 
Norfolk Street abandoned. About 950 feet of this pipe have been 
laid in Prospect and Austin streets by the Hugh Nawn Contracting 
Company, under the supervision of this department. The laying of 
the pipes over the subway and making the necessary connections 
will not be done until spring. It is expected that the construction 



142 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

of the subway will also necessitate changes in the 48-inch main at 
Harvard Square during the coming year. 

The maintenance of the water in the Charles River at grade 8 
by the closing of the Charles River Dam has made necessary the re- 
enforcement of the riprap on the shore at the pipe crossing near the 
foot of Magazine Street in Cambridge. 

A 48-inch wooden insulating joint was substituted for the rubber 
joint on Middlesex Avenue in Medford, at a cost of $297. 

The ironwork on the bridge supporting the 48-inch main over the 
Boston & Maine Railroad at Walnut Street in Somerville has been 
scraped and painted with two coats of red lead and one coat of 
Smith's compound. The sheet lead Vie of an inch thick, with which 
the lower chord of the bridge girders was covered in 1907 as a pro- 
tection against the gases from the locomotives, was replaced with 
lead y 8 of an inch in thickness, as holes had been worn through the 
thinner lead by the cinder blast from the engine smoke stacks. 

A portion of the plank floor was relaid on the bridge over the 
Boston & Maine Railroad at College Avenue in Medford. 

In addition to connections made on account of the laying of new 
mains a 16-inch connection was made in Maiden Square between 
the 30-inch high-service main and a 12-inch main of the city of 
Maiden, to be used only for supplying water for the extinguishment 
of fires. 

A connection with the Chelsea pipe system on Powderhorn Hill 
was enlarged from 8 inches to 12 inches in order to furnish an ample 
supply for a special fire service main laid by the city of Chelsea for 
the protection of several large manufacturing plants. 

Meteeino of Water to Municipalities. 

On December 31, 1909, there were 60 Venturi meters, 4 Hersey 
disc, 1 Hersey torrent and 1 Hersey detector meters, 1 Crown and 
3 Union rotary meters connected with the pipe system for use in 
measuring the water supplied to the several municipalities in the 
Metropolitan District. These meters have been read and inspected 
twice each week, and repaired when necessary by a force of 2 men, 
with occasionally an assistant. Reports have been made monthly 
to the several municipalities supplied with water, giving the quan- 
tities used, and special reports have been made from time to time of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 143 

the increased use due to leakage or other causes. The throat of the 
meter through which the town of Lexington is supplied has been 
reduced in diameter from 4% inches to 3 inches, that of the meter 
supplying the Chelsea high-service district from 5 inches to 3% 
inches, and that of one of the meters supplying the high-service 
district in Maiden, located at the junction of Cross and Hancock 
streets, from 4 inches to 2% inches. A new 12-inch meter with a 
2y 2 - incn throat has been installed at the junction of Highland Avenue 
and Clifton Street in Maiden. All of these changes were made neces- 
sary by the reduced rates of consumption during the night, caused by 
the reduction of waste. 

On May 5 a 3-inch Hersey torrent-meter was set on Clifton Street 
at the line between Revere and Saugus, for use in measuring the 
water supplied from the Revere pipe system to a small section of the 
town of Saugus. 

The meter used for measuring the water consumed in Winthrop 
was moved from the corner of Atlantic and Crescent avenues in 
Beachmont to the Winthrop-Revere line on October 23. The register 
chamber used with this meter and the chamber used with the meter 
located at the corner of Cross and Hancock streets in Maiden have 
been covered with cork and pitch, to prevent freezing of the regis- 
tering apparatus. 

Pressure Regulators and Recording Gages. 

The number of automatic regulators used for reducing the pres- 
sure in the mains and for controlling the elevation of the water in 
standpipes and reservoirs was at the end of the year 8, one more than 
for the previous year. 

The 10-inch regulator used to control the pressure in Winthrop 
and the level of the water in Breed's Island standpipe was repaired 
and moved to the Revere-Winthrop line, and an 8-inch regulator of 
the Metropolitan Water Works type was set on the pipe supplying 
Breed's Island. 

The other regulators in use have been overhauled and adjusted. 

The recording pressure gages connected with the Distribution 
System have been in constant use, and the average maximum and 
minimum elevations of the water, due to the pressure at nineteen 
points in different parts of the District, are given in Appendix No. 



144 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

4, Table No. 42. These gages furnish valuable records of both the 
amount and time of changes in pressure due to breaks in the mains, 
or other causes. 

Electrolysis. 

On account of the large amount of construction work in progress 
the electrical survey covering the entire ' Distribution System, which 
has been made nearly every year since 1898, to determine the con- 
ditions governing electrolytic action on the Metropolitan Water Works 
pipe lines, was not made during the past year. 

Measurements made during the latter part of 1908 showed that 
considerable electricity was flowing past the 48-inch insulating joint 
located in Middlesex Avenue in Medford on the north shore of the 
Mystic River, indicating that the rubber insulation in this joint 
had failed. During the latter part of March this joint was removed 
from the pipe line, and upon examination the rubber gasket was 
found to be hard and black in spots, with a cinder-like appearance, 
as if it had been carbonized. This joint had been in service since 
January 10, 1905, and the condition of the rubber gasket appeared 
to be similar to that of the rubber gasket removed from the insulating 
joint in Porter Square, Cambridge, in August, 1906. Several of 
the nuts on the bolts of the Middlesex Avenue joint were badly eaten 
by electrolytic action, and the positive section of the joint contained 
numerous electrolytic pittings about % of an inch in depth. Elec- 
trolytic pittings from % to % of an inch in depth were also found 
on two lengths of 48-inch pipe on the north or positive side of the 
joint. On March 24 this rubber joint was replaced by a wooden 
joint, which stopped further flow of electricity over the pipe lines 
at this point. 

Recent measurements at four other 48-inch joints that have the 
rubber insulation show that considerable electricity is flowing past 
them, and indicate that the rubber gaskets on these joints have also 
failed in the same manner as in' the two joints which have already 
been removed. One of these joints is located on North Harvard 
Street in Brighton on the south shore of the Charles River, one in 
Franklin Street near Lincoln Street in Brighton, one in Boylston 
Street in Cambridge on the north shore of the Charles River, and 
the other in the Francis estate in Brighton on the south shore of the 
Charles River. The joints in North Harvard and Franklin streets 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 145 

should be replaced with wooden joints early in the coming year, but 
it will not be necessary to replace the other two joints as the elec- 
trical conditions have changed since they were set. 

On all new pipe lines laid during the past year wooden staves 
have been substituted for lead and jute in making the joints at 
intervals of about 500 feet for the purpose of reducing the electrical 
conductivity of the pipe line, also on all connections with, other lines 
to prevent the flow of current between the lines. In carrying out 
this policy ten 60-inch, twenty 48-inch, three 36-inch, twenty-four 
24-inch, seven 16-inch, four 12-inch and one 6-inch joints have been 
set during the year. The pipes used for making the joints differ 
from the ordinary form only by being cast without any lead groove 
in the bell or bead on the spigot end. A wooden ring is placed in 
the bell to prevent metallic contact between the ends of the pipes, 
and the space ordinarily filled with lead and jute is filled with pine 
staves. The cost of these joints has been approximately as follows : 
60-inch $12.45, 48-inch $10.55, 36-inch $8.40, 24-inch $6.15, 16-inch 
$5.05, 12-inch $4.35 each. 

All of the wood insulating joints installed this year in the new 48- 
inch low-service main in Beacon Street, between the effluent gate- 
house at Chestnut Hill Reservoir and Coolidge Corner, a distance of 
about 8,900 feet, were provided with No. 10 by-pass wires arranged 
so that measurements of the efficiency of the joints in preventing the 
flow of electricity could be made after the pipe line was placed in 
service. By means of these by-pass wires the fall of potential and the 
current at each joint can be accurately measured at any time, and by 
connecting the by-pass wires so as to short-circuit all of the joints an 
approximate idea is obtained of the quantity of electricity that would 
flow over the main if no insulating joint had been set in the line. 
As it was not practicable to put in by-pass wires with as low resist- 
ance as that of the lead joint, the quantity of electricity flowing on 
the pipe line when the insulating joints are short circuited in this 
way is somewhat less than it would be if the joints were all of lead, 
but the results obtained are instructive and of value in showing that 
the effect of the joints is at least greater than the apparent efficiency 
shown by the observations. 

The investigation of the effect of the insulating joints installed on 
this portion of the 48-inch pipe line is not yet entirely completed, but 



146 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



the information already obtained indicates that the amount of current 
now flowing on the pipe line is less than 10 per cent, of the quantity 
which would flow if the insulating joints had not been used. 

No excavations were made during the year for the purpose of 
examining pipe lines for corrosion. The pipe cut out of the westerly 
low-service main in repairing break in Harvard Square on December 
25 contained numerous shallow pittings from % to % of an inch 
in depth, most of which were located near the bottom of the pipe 
and near the underground conduit containing railway return cables. 

The examination of the easterly low-service 48-inch main at a point 
just north of the insulating joint on Middlesex Avenue, in Medford, 
showed that the corrosion of the pipe at this place is gradually in- 
creasing, but probably has not yet progressed far enough to endanger 
the safety of the pipe line. The districts where the most serious 
corrosion is now going on are near the Harvard power station of the 
Boston Elevated Railway Company at Boylston Street, Cambridge, 
and near the power stations of the Boston & Northern Street Railway 
Company in Chelsea and Lynn, where measurements made during 
the year show conditions similar to those found a year ago. As the 
12-inch pipe in Washington Street, Lynn, was relaid in 1904 on ac- 
count of electrolytic corrosion which had taken place in a period of 
six years, it will be desirable to have this pipe examined during the 
coming year. 

Clinton Sewerage. 

The Clinton sewage-disposal works were in daily operation through- 
out the year. The quantity of sewage pumped to the filter-beds was 
854,000 gallons per day, an increase of 67,000 gallons per day over 
the preceding year. This increase was due in part to the large 
amount of surface water which entered the sewers during the months 
of April and May, and in part to the natural increase in the quantity 
of sewage due to the extension of the sewerage system in the town of 
Clinton. The daily average quantities pumped each month were as 
follows : — 





Gallons. 




Gallons. 


January, . 


692,000 


July, 


664,000 


February, 


927,000 


August, 


687,000 


March, 


960,000 


September, 


658,000 


April, 


. 1,312,000 


October, 


696,000 


May, 


. 1,201,000 


November, 


715,000 


June, 


. . . 955,000 


December, 


795,000 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 147 

Following are statistics relating to the operation of the pumping 
station : — 

Daily average quantity of sewage pumped (gallons), . . . 854,000 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), . . . 1,490 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, ...... 573 

Number of days pumping, 365 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, . . . ... $1,723 41 

Fuel, 1,210 25 

Repairs and supplies, 258 44 

Total for station, v $3,192 10 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $10,240 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, . 206 

Notwithstanding an increase of 8.5 per cent, in the quantity 
pumped, the cost of operating the station was only about 1 per cent, 
more than during the preceding year. 

Filter-beds. 

The sewage was applied on the filter-beds in practically the same 
manner as during the preceding year. The beds were used in rota- 
tion throughout the year except as interrupted by work on the ex- 
tension of the underdrainage system and the placing of carriers on 
the surface of the beds. Each bed has received an average of 61,600 
gallons of sewage in thirty minutes about twice in three days. Al] of 
the beds were used during the winter, and for this use furrows about 
1 foot in depth were made on the surface of the beds 3 feet 6 inches 
apart. The eight settling basins into which the sewage is pumped 
previous to being applied to the filter-beds were used in rotation 
continuously throughout the year in the same manner as described 
in the report for 1908. The sludge collected in these basins, amount- 
ing to about 900 cubic yards, has been used on grass lands belonging 
to the Board on the North and South dikes and near the Wachusett 
Dam. 

The results of the chemical analyses of the sewage and effluent 
are given in the following table : — 



148 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



[Parts per 100,000.] 





1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


January 
to June, 

1909, 
inclusive. 


July to 
Decem- 
ber, 1909, 
inclusive. 


Whole 
Year 
1909. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, . 


.7967 


1.1250 


.8558 


.8442 


.5735 


.7067 


.7783 


.7425 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 


.0686 


.0787 


.0955 


.0744 


.0554 


.0916 


.0722 


.0819 


Per cent, removed, . 


91 


93 


89 


91 


90 


87 


91 


89 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, 


8.57 


13.11 


9.84 


7.87 


3.43 


6.12 


7.95 


7.04 


Oxygen consumed, effluent, 


.99 


1.126 


1.34 


1.07 


.765 


1.17 


1.16 


1.165 


Per cent, removed, . 


88 


91 


86 


87 


78 


81 


85 


83 


Free ammonia, sewage, . 


3.97 


4.7533 


3.5650 


3.8342 


4.6193 


3.8533 


5.4033 


4.6283 


Free ammonia, effluent, . 


.99 


.9588 


1.2723 


1.3176 


1.3722 


1.6217 


.9617 


1.2917 


Per cent, removed, . 


75 


80 


64 


66 


70 


58 


82 


70 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, . 


.4046 


.2665 


.1445 


.1664 


.1468 


.0688 


.3950 


.2319 


Iron, effluent 


1.2941 


1.6230 


2.1042 


2.2454 


1.8100 


2.1800 


1.3467 


1.7633 



The increase in the amount of nitrates and the decrease in the 
amount of iron in the effluent, especially during the latter half of 
the year, indicate that the addition of filtering area and the installa- 
tion of under drains and carriers, which were begun in 1908 and 
continued in 1909, have tended to improve the efficiency of the beds. 
It is expected that still further improvement will be shown when 
carriers have been installed over the remaining beds. 

During the past year a new bed, known as bed No. 7, has been 
graded, and bed No. 9, which has heretofore been of little value on 
account of the poor quality of the filtering material and the nearness 
of the ground water to the surface of the bed, has been raised 3 feet 
and underdrained. 

Four lines of 6-inch vitrified pipe underdrains were laid under 
bed No. 9 and two lines under 15 other beds, together with the neces- 
sary lamp holes and manholes. 

Carriers with concrete bottoms . and plank sides have been built 
on 7 of the 24 beds and the beds regraded so as to secure a uniform 
distribution of the sewage over the surface of each bed. 

The following table shows the amount of work done during the 
year : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



149 



Quantity. 



Cost. 



6-inch vitrified pipe underdrain laid with cement joints, 
6-inch vitrified pipe underdrain laid with gravel joints, 
6-inch lamp holes laid with cement joints, . 

Brick manholes 

Earth excavation, 

Earth excavation, grading bed No. 7, . 

Concrete carriers on 7 beds, ...... 



985.5 lin. ft. 
7,586.5 lin. ft. 

384.0 lin. ft. 
3 
7,620 cu. yds. 

630 cu. yds. 
1,309.2 lin. ft. 



• $0,353 per ft. 



1.286 per yd. 
).425 per yd. 
). 937 per ft. 



The above work was done by day-labor forces between June 7 and 
October 18, at a total cost of $7,109.85, which includes the cost of 
all materials used, and is divided among the principal items as fol- 
lows : — 



Laying 6-inch vitrified pipe, 
Building- brick manholes, 
Earth excavation, . 
Building concrete carriers, 
Miscellaneous, 



$3,165 


37 


125 


36 


2,450 


72 


1,226 


43 


141 


97 



Total, 



$7,109 85 



During the past two years the effective filtering area has been in- 
creased from 23 to 25 acres; 13,128 feet of 6-inch vitrified pipe 
under drains have been laid in 23 of the 24 beds and concrete carriers 
for the better distribution of the sewage have been placed on 7 of the 
beds. The total amount expended on these improvements during the 
two years was $9,880.84. Concrete carriers are to be placed upon 
the remaining 17 beds during the coming year. 

The cost of maintaining the filter-beds, exclusive of the cost of im- 
proving the beds, laying underdrains and building carriers, has been 
as follows : — 

Labor, $3 ? 091 02 

Repairs and supplies, 131 13 



Total, 
Cost per million gallons treated, 



$3,222 15 
10 43 



150 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Daily tests of the sewage and effluent, to determine the amount of 
dissolved oxygen and iron, have been made by the keeper in charge of 
the beds. 

Engineeking. 

The greater portion of the time of the engineering force is now de- 
voted to matters pertaining to the maintenance and operation of the 
works. The more important of these matters are the superintendence 
of the operation of the Venturi meters and of the flow of water from 
the several reservoirs through the aqueducts ; the determination of 
the quantities of water used in the several municipalities ; the tabu- 
lation of the records of rainfall as measured at twelve stations on 
the works, of the elevations of the several storage and distributing 
reservoirs, and of the pressures in the mains at different points in 
the Metropolitan District; the making of calculations to determine 
the yield of the several watersheds, the quantities delivered by the 
several aqueducts, the quantities pumped at the several pumping sta- 
tions, and the cost of pumping, the testing of coal and oil, and the 
examination of the pipes to determine the injury from electrolytic 
action. 

Special engineering work done during the past year has included 
the making of surveys and the preparation of plans and specifications 
for works for conveying the surface drainage of the village of Co- 
chituate outside the Cochituate watershed ; the superintendence of the 
construction of additional beds and the laying of underdrains and 
concrete carriers at the Clinton sewerage filter-beds ; the preparation 
of plans and the giving of lines and grades in connection with the 
improvement of Lake Cochituate. 

Cement Tests. 
The results of the tests of cements used in the construction of 
the Wachusett Aqueduct, the Wachusett Dam and Reservoir and the 
Weston Aqueduct from 1896 to 1905 were published in the annual 
reports of the Board until 1906. As the results of tests of cements 
used in the construction of the distributing works have never been 
published, and as the results of T^-year and 10-year tests on other 
works are now available, it has been thought advisable to publish the 
later tests in the present report. They will be found in Appendix 
No. 3. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 151 

Appended to this report are tables giving the amount of work 
done and other information relative to contracts, tables giving long- 
time tests of cements, and a long series of tables relating to the main- 
tenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, including the rainfall, 
yield of sources of supply, consumption of water in the different dis- 
tricts, the number of service pipes, meters and fire hydrants in the 
Metropolitan Water District, and a summary of statistics for 1909. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DEXTER BRACKETT, 

Chief Engineer. 

Boston, January 1, 1910. 



152 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE 

WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the operations of the 
Engineering Department of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works for 
the year ending December 31, 1909. 



Organization. 

The engineering organization during the year has been as fol- 
lows : — 



Division Engineers : — 
Frederick D. Smith, 



Frank I. Capen, . 



In charge of maintenance and 

construction, South Metropoli- 
tan System. 

In charge of maintenance and 

construction, North Metropoli- 
tan System. 



Assistant Engineer: — 
Henry T. Stiff, . 



In charge of office and drafting 
room. 



In addition to the above, there were employed at the end of the 
year 12 engineering and other assistants. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



153 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 
Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
sewerage districts. The area of the North Metropolitan District 
remains at 90.50 square miles, and of the South Metropolitan Dis- 
trict at 100.87 square miles, — a total, inclusive of water surfaces, 
of 191.37 square miles. These districts include the whole or parts of 
25 cities and towns, as set forth in the following table. 

The populations in the table are based on the census of 1905. 



Table showing Areas and Estimated Populations within the Metropolitan 
Sewerage District, as of December 31, 1909. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Estimated 
Population. 



a 5 



o 

&■* 

P 

3 
O 

m 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston (portions of), 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea, . 

Everett, . 

Lexington, 1 . 

Maiden, . 

Medford, 

Melrose, . 

Revere, . 

Somerville, 

Stoneham, 

Wakefield, 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, 



Boston (portions of), 
Brookline, 
Dedham, 1 
Hyde Park, . 
Milton, . 
Newton, 
Quincy, . 
Waltham, 
.Watertown, 



Totals, 



5.20 
4.66 
3.45 
6.11 
2.24 
3.34 

•5.11 
5.07 
8.35 
3.73 
5.86 
3.96 
5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 

12.71 



20.39 

6 81 

9.40 

4.57 

12.59 

16.88 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 



90.50 



100.87 



191.37 



10,820 

5,060 

97,757 

105,000 

36,300 

33,760 

4,550 

41,640 

22,190 

15,470 

15,120 

76,160 

6,810 

11,480 

9,500 

9,260 

14,520 



181,230 
27,500 

8,050 
15,650 

7,920 
44,000 
31.970 
29,050 
12,810 



515,397 



358,180 
873,577 



1 Part of town. 



154 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

Within the Sewerage Districts there are now 101.985 miles of Met- 
ropolitan sewers. Of this total, 8.79 miles of sewers, with the Quincy 
pumping station, have been purchased from cities and towns of the 
districts, the remaining 93.195 miles of Metropolitan sewers and 
other works having been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the system : — - 



North Metropolitan System. 







CD 

s 


■ 1 

S . 


Special, Connections. 






d A 


CITY OR TOWN. 


Size of Sewers. 


.2 

a 


ublic Cc 
tions, D 
ber 31, 1 


Character or Location of 
Connection. 


.3 .g 

_Q l~ 

a 2 

S a 

30 






J 


h 




l A 


Boston: — 












Deer Island, 


6' 3", to 9', . . 


1.367 


4 


- - 


- 


East Boston, 


9'to 1', . ■ . 


5.467 


23 


Shoe factory, 


1 


Charlestown, 


6'7"x7'5"to 1'. • 


3.292 


r 


Navy Yard 

Almshouse, .... 
Club House, .... 


8 
1 
1 




9', 


?, 864 


11 1 

r 


Fire Dept. Station, 
Private Building, . 
Bakery, 


1 
1 
1 


Chelsea, . 


8'4"x9'2"to 1'10"X2'4", . 


5.123 


• 

r 


Rendering works, . 
Metropolitan Water Works 

blow-off, .... 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 
3 


Everett, . 


8'2"x8'10"to4'8"x5'l", . 


2.925 


6 f 

r 


blow-off, .... 
Cameron Appliance Co., 
Shultz-Goodwin Co., . 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 
1 
1 


Maiden, . 


4'6"x4'10"to 1'3", . 


4.4931 


28 i 


blow-off, 
Private buildings, 


1 
140 








r 


Private buildings, 


109 


Melrose, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", 


6.099 2 


34 i 


Factory, .... 


1 








Railroad station, . 


1 


Cambridge, . 


5'2"x5'9"to 1'3", . 


7.167 


« 


Slaughter house, . 

City Hospital, 

Tannery, .... 

Slaughter-houses (3), . 


1 
2 
1 
1 


Somerville, 


6'5"x7'2"to 1'10"X2'3", . 


3.471 


10' 


Car-house, .... 
Street railway power house, . 

Stable, 

Rendering works, . 
Armory building, . 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 


Medford, 


4'8"x5'l"to 10", 


5.359 


21 • 


Private buildings, 

Stable, 

Police sub-station, 


8 
1 
1 










Tannery, .... 
Private buildings, 


2 
2 


Winchester, . 


2'll"x3'3"to 1'3", . 


6.428 


13 ■ 


Gelatine factory, . 

Stable, ..... 

Railroad station, . 


1 
1 
1 


Stone ham, 


l'3"to 10", .... 


0.010 


4 


- - 


- 


Woburn, 


1' 10"x2'4"to 1'3", . 


0.933 


3 


Glue factory, . . . 


1 



1 Includes .988 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



155 



North Metropolitan System — Concluded. 





Size of Sewers. 


73 
01 

s 

a 
A 
a 


Public Connec- 
tions, Decem- 
ber 31, 1909. 


Special Connections. 


CITY OR TOWN. 


Character or Location of 
Connection. 


.S.o 
^'■^ 

O! 03 

S a 

1° 


Arlington, 

Belmont, 2 
Wakefield, 2 . 
Revere, . 


l'6"to 10" 

4' to 3', 


3.520 1 
0.048 


35 J 

3 

1 
2 


Private buildings, 
Railroad station, . 
Car-house, .... 
Post Office 


128 
1 
3 
1 




58. 566 3 


252 


434 



South Metropolitan System. 





1 




r 


Tufts Medical School, . 
Private house, 


1 
1 


Boston (Back Bay), 


6' 6" to 3 ' 9", 


1.500* 


13 


Administration Building, 

Boston Park Department, 
Simmons College buildings, . 
Art Museum, 


1 
1 
2 


Boston (Brighton), 


5'9"x6'0"to 12", 


6.010 s 


11 


Abattoir, .... 


3 








■I 


Chocolate works, . 


2 


Boston (Dorches- 
ter). 


3'x4'to2'6"x2'7", . 


2.870 6 


Machine shop, 
Paper mill, . 


1 
1 






Private buildings, 


2 


Boston (Roxbury), 


6'6"X7', 4'0", . 


1.430 


r 


Parental school, 


1 


Boston (West Rox- 


9'3"xl0'2"to 12", 


7.600 


9 


Lutheran Evangelical Church, 


1 


bury). 






1 


Private buildings, 


4 


Brookline, 


6'6"x7'0"to8" . 


2.540^ 


10 


- _ 


_ 


Dedham, 


4'x4'l"to3'9"X3'10", 


2.350 


5 


_ _ 


_ 


Hull, . 


60" pipe, .... 


0.750 


- 


- 


- 


Hyde Park, . 


10'7"xll'7"to4'x4'l", . 


4.527 


»•{ 


Mattapan Paper Mills, . 
Private buildings, 


1 

2 


Milton, . 


H'Xl2'to8", 


3.600 


16 


- _ 


_ 


Newton, / . 


4'2"x4'9"to 1'3", . 


2.911 


6 


Private houses, 


2 


Quincy, . 


H'3"xl2'6"to24"pipe, . 


6.580 


6 


— _ 


_ 


Waltham, 


3'6"x4', . 


0.001 


1 


- 


_ 


Watertown, . 


4'2"x4'9"to 12", .. . 


0.750 8 


•{ 


Factories, .... 
Stanley Motor Carriage Co., . 


2 
1 




43.419 


107 


29 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

2 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 

3 Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic River valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running 
parallel with the Metropolitan sewer. 

4 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

5 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also, .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

6 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

7 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 

8 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



156 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Cost of Construction. 

[To December 31, 1909.] 

The cost of the 101.985 miles of Metropolitan sewers enumerated 
above, including six pumping stations, screen-house, siphons and ap- 
pertaining structures, may be summarized as follows : — 



North Metropolitan System, . 
South Metropolitan System, . 



$6,312,130 61 
8,785,297 80 

$15,097,428 41 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the whole Metropolitan Sewerage District appear 
in the following table : — 

North Metropolitan District. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 


Estimated 

Total 

Population. 


M iles of 
Local Sewer 
connected. 


Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 


Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent.). 


Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 


Public. 


Special. 


90.50 


515,397 


652.56 


445,637 


86.5 


252 


434 



South Metropolitan District. 



100.87 



358,180 



524.01 



233,025 



65.1 



107 



29 



Entire Metropolitan District. 



191.37 



873,577 



1,176.57 



678,662 



77.7 



359 



463 



Of the estimated gross population of 873,577 on December 31, 
1909, 678,662, representing 77.7 per cent,, were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,176.57 miles of local sewers owned by the individual munic- 
ipalities. These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan System 
by 359 public and 463 special connections. It appears, also, that 
there has been during the year an increase of 44.21 miles of local 
sewers connected with the Metropolitan System, and that 19 public 
and 14 special connections have been added. 






No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 



Pumping Stations and Pumpage. 

The following table shows the average daily volume of sewage 
lifted at each of the six Metropolitan pumping stations during the 
year, as compared with the corresponding volumes for the previous 
year : — 



PUMPING STATION. 



Average Daily Pumpage. 



Jan. 1, 1908, 

to 
Dec. 31, 1908. 



Jan. 1, 1909, 

to 
Dec. 31, 1909. 



Increase during the 
Year. 



Deer Island 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Alewife Brook, .... 

Quincy 

Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 



Gallons. 
59,800,000 

57,800,000 

31,300,000 

3,627,000 

3,687,000 

22,300,000 



Gallons. 
60,600,000 

58,600,000 

32,100 000 

3,358,000 

4,163,000 

22,700,000 



Gallons. 
800,000 

800,000 

800,000 

269,000 

476,000 

400,000 



Per Cent. 
1.3 

1.4 

2.6 

7.41 

12.9 

1.8 



1 Decrease. 

CONSTRUCTION. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

Chapter 556 of the legislative Acts of -1908 provided an appro- 
priation of $445,000 for extensions and additions to the East Boston 
and Deer Island pumping stations. 

Chapter 582 of the legislative Acts of 1908 provided $40,000 
for the restoration of the existing East Boston pumping station, 
damaged during the great Chelsea fire of April 12, 1908. 



Construction at Deer Island Station. 

Under the above-mentioned Acts, construction for the extensions 
of the coal and engine houses at Deer Island had been started during 
the year 1908. As outlined in the last report, the foundations for 
the extensions had been completed and changes made in the roads 
and connecting manholes near the station and on the discharge 
sewer. 

During the present year miscellaneous grading has been done by 
day labor, under the direction of the Chief Engineer, about the ex- 
tensions to the coal and engine houses; the manholes at connections 



158 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

with the discharge sewer have been completed, and a 60-inch cast-iron 
discharge pipe placed from the engine honse extension to the dis- 
charge sewer, with Venturi meter and controlling valves. Masonry 
floors for the basement and main engine room extension, with con- 
crete foundations for an additional engine and four boilers have been 
built by day labor. Work by day labor on a by-pass channel on the 
main sewer under the screen-house, to provide for additional screens, 
is in progress at the date of this report. It is anticipated it may be 
completed in March. 

A contract for the masonry superstructures for the coal and engine 
house extensions was made on March 8, 1909, with Walter A. Went- 
worth Company. This contract provided for a masonry coal house 
103 feet long and 35 feet wide, and a new engine room 50 feet long 
and 46 feet wide. The work under this contract was completed early 
in September. 

On November 2, 1908, a contract was made with the Allis-Chalmers 
Company of Milwaukee for one 100,000,000-gallon centrifugal pump 
and engine with four horizontal, tubular boilers, from special design 
by E. W. Dean, with piping and appurtenances. The boilers were 
constructed for the contractor by the Robb-Mumford Boiler Company 
of South Framingham. The boilers were delivered and placed on 
the foundations during the summer and fall. Castings for the pump 
and engine were delivered at Deer Island early in September. At the 
date of this report the whole pumping plant and appurtenances pro- 
vided for in the Allis-Chalmers contract have been substantially com- 
pleted in condition for carrying out the tests specified in the contract. 

Construction at East Boston Station. 

Under the before-noted legislative Acts, the East Boston pumping 
station, destroyed by the fire of April 12, 1908, was temporarily 
repaired, in condition to be operated, within a few weeks from the 
date of the fire. 

On August 13, 1909, a contract was made with the Woodbury & 
Leighton Company for permanent repairs to the existing East Boston 
station, and for making extensions to engine and boiler houses and 
a new coal house. As permanently developed, the station will be 
fireproof, with concrete roof and floors, masonry walls, steel doors 
and window frames. The station to be built will be 268 feet in 




NEW ENGINE at DEER ISLAND SEWERAGE PUMPING STATION. 




NEW BOILERS at DEER ISLAND SEWERAGE PUMPING STATION, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 159 

length and 65 feet in width. This makes provision for a fourth 
centrifugal pumping engine of 100,000,000 gallons capacity, with 
six new boilers, dynamo room, machine shop and storage for 1,500 
tons of coal. The walls of the station are to be brick, laid largely in 
Portland cement, with granite trimmings. 

At the date of this report the outside walls of the old buildings 
have been refaced with 4 inches of brick, laid in Portland cement 
and securely bonded to the old walls. A new granite base course and 
granite trimmings have been introduced. The masonry foundations 
for the extensions of the station are about half completed. It is 
anticipated the station building may be completed by September 1, 
1910. 

On June 5, 1909, a contract was made with the Allis-Chalmers 
Company of Milwaukee for one 100,000,000-gallon centrifugal pump 
and engine for the East Boston station, to be placed on foundations 
furnished by the Board, to be in condition for regular service in the 
house not later than June, 1911. 

On December 15, 1909, a contract was made with the Robb-Mum- 
f ord Boiler Company of South Eramingham for six vertical, internally 
fired boilers, from special designs by E. W. Dean, to be delivered, on 
foundations furnished by the Board, on or before September 1, 1910. 

Construction by day labor, under the direction of the Engineer, 
has been carried out at the station during the year, involving modifi- 
cations of the discharge tube from the third engine, to avoid inter- 
ference with the walls of the proposed extension of the engine house. 
This has involved breaking out a length of this tube, moving the 
48-inch cast-iron check valve, rebuilding the tube and replacing the 
valve. 

The foundation walls on the Chelsea Creek side of the existing 
engine house were badly scarred and cracked in the fire of April 12, 
1908. During the year a sheet of reinforced Portland concrete about 
8 inches thick has been anchored to the face of the wall and the walls 
grouted. The concrete reinforcement extends from a depth of 2 feet 
below the bed of the creek to the top of the foundation walls. 

Masonry heads of the large controlling manholes about the station 
and screen-house were badly scarred and cracked in the fire. During 
the year the scarred granite heads of these chambers have been re- 
moved and replaced with concrete. The foundation of the screen- 



160 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc 

house along Addison Street and over the screen pits has been further 
strengthened by additional girders. These bearing and supporting 
beams for the screen-house and machinery have been surrounded and 
reinforced with concrete by day labor. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 
Extension of the High-levee Seweb through West Roxbuky, 

Brooklixe axd Brighton. 

This extension, authorized by chapter 406 of the Acts of 190G, 
involving a length of 5.64 miles of main sewers, was fully completed 
March 5, 1909. 

During the year it has been put into service and at the date of 
the report important areas of Brookline are draining into it. 

Section 81, Brookline. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 

Contractors. — Bruno & Petitti, Contract Xo. 60 (Sta. to 21 + 40). Hugh 
Nawn Contracting Company, Contract Xo. 61 (Sta. 21-4-40 to 34 + 15). 

This section extends from near the boundary line between West 
Roxbury and Brookline, near the junction of Chestnut Street and 
Pond Avenue, along Chestnut, Kendall and Cypress streets to Boyl- 
ston Street, in Brookline, — a distance of 3,415 feet. 

The contract with Bruno & Petitti, extending from the town line 
along Chestnut and Kendall streets, — a distance of 2,140 feet, was 
practically completed at the date of the last report except for replac- 
ing street surfaces. The town of Brookline resurfaced the whole 
street over the line of this section with bitulithic and macadam pave- 
ment. The contractor for this section arranged with the town of 
Brookline to make the necessary repairs along the sewer trenches dur- 
ing the months of ATay and June. 

Section 85, Brighton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Superintendent of Construction by Day Labor. — Chas. A. Haskin (Sta. to 
11 + 42). 

Contractors. — George M. Bryne Company, Contract Xo. 63 (Sta. 11 + 42 to 

24 + 00). D. F. O'Connei.l Company. Contract Xo. 64 (Sta. 24 + 00 to 

47 + 00). Hugh Nawn Contracting Company, Contract Xo. 65 (Sta. 
47 -f 00 to 63 + 50). 






No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 161 

This section extends from near Allston Street, along Commonwealth 
Avenue, Warren, Cambridge and Washington streets; to near Lake 
Street, — a distance of 6,350 feet. The lower portion of this section 
was constructed by the Board by day labor. Three contracts were 
made for the construction of the remainder of the section. 

The day-labor section and sections by George M. Bryne Company 
and Hugh Nawn Contracting Company were completed prior to the 
date of this report. On the D. F. O'Connell section about 30 feet 
of tunnel near the shaft remained to be lined and the shaft refilled 
and surface completed. This was completed February 13, 1909. 

Section 86, Brighton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Contractors. — Glenn & Broderick, Contract No. 66, for 1,650 linear feet of 
12-ineh pipe sewer and 715 linear feet of 42-inch concrete sewer. Charles 
J. Jacobs Company, Contract No. 67, for 1,305 linear feet of 69-inch X 72-inch 
concrete sewer and 1,135 linear feet of 72-inch X 48-inch reinforced concrete 
sewer. 

This section extends westerly through Washington Street from a 
point about 200 feet east of Lake Street to Nonantum Street, at Oak 
Square, — a distance of 2,440 linear feet. 

A contract for the construction of the main sewer for this section 
was made with the Charles J. Jacobs Company on August 4, 1908. 
On January 1, 1909, the work remaining comprised about 70 linear 
feet of trench excavation and the placing of the masonry for a length 
of 113 feet. 

This work, except for street surfaces, was completed March 5, 1909. 
By arrangement with the Contractor, the Street Department of the 
city of Boston during the summer months placed a new street surface 
over the entire length of this section. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Scope of Work and Force employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 stations and 101.985 miles of Metropolitan sewers, 
receiving the discharge from 1,176.57 miles of town and city sewers 



162 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

at 359 points, together with the care and study of inverted siphons 
under streams and in the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force of 148 men includes 88 engineers 
and other employes at the pumping stations, and 60 men employed 
on actual sewer maintenance and care of pumping station grounds. 
In the following three tables the use of the completed systems and 
other data are shown : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



163 





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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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166 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CAPACITY AND RESULTS. 

The following tables summarize the pumping records for the year 
for the Metropolitan sewerage stations : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 49,100,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 60,600,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 
Coal used: Davis and New River, costing from $3,785 to $4.21 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island 
Pumping Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1909. 
January, .... 


1,887,300,000 


60,900,000 


45,900,000 


91,800,000 


10.38 


50,300,000 


February, 






2,156,000,000 


77,000,000 


47,800,000 


138,300,000 


10.82 


48,000,000 


March, 






2,250,500,000 


72,600,000 


58,100,000 


103,800,000 


10.85 


45,900,000 


April, 






1,987,500,000 


66,300,000 


55,600,000 


105,600,000 


10.47 


50,400,000 


May, 






1,840,300,000 


59,400,000 


46,200,000 


91,000,000 


10.54 


49,200,000 


June, 






1,854,400,000 


61,800,000 


44,400,000 


92,700,000 


10.39 


56,000,000 


July, 






1,597,000,000 


51,500,000 


45,200,000 


70,700,000 


10.11 


49,500,000 


August, . 






1,599,000,000 


51,600,000 


42,800,000 


83,900,000 


10.21 


51,500,000 


September, 






1,734,000,000 


57,800,000 


44,100,000 


94,400,000 


10.24 


48,000,000 


October, . 






1,503,400,000 


48,500,000 


38,800,000 


63,600,000 


10.31 


48,800,000 


November, 






1,640,600,000 


54,700,000 


37,400,000 


139,500,000 


11.15 


49,700,000 


December, 






2,011,900,000 


64,900,000 


49,600,000 


109,100,000 


11.28 


41,600,000 


Total, 


22,061,900,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


60,600,000 


46,300,000 


98,700,000 


10.56 


49,100,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



167 



East Boston Pumping Station. 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 48,600,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 58,600,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman 

and 3 helpers. 
Coal used: Davis and New Eiver, costing from $3.26 to $3,915 per gross ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston 
Pumping Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1909. 
January, .... 


1,825,300,000 


58,900,000 


43,900,000 


89,800,000 


15.69 


45,300,000 


February, 








2,100,000,000 


75,000,000 


45,800,000 


136,300,000 


15.99 


48,300,000 


March, 








2,188,400,000 


70,600,000 


56,100,000 


101,800,000 


16.08 


' 49,700,000 


April, 








1,928,000,000 


64,300,000 


53,600,000 


103,600,000 


15.92 


49,700,000 


May . 








1,778,300,000 


57,400,000 


44,200,000 


89,000,000 


16.83 


47,200,000 


June, 








1,794,400,000 


59,800,000 


42,400,000 


90,700,000 


15.32 


44,000,000 


July, 








1,535,000,000 


49,500,000 


43,200,000 


68,700,000 


15.42 


50,700,000 


August, . 








1,537,000,000 


49,600,000 


40,800,000 


81,900,000 


15.35 


53,000,000 


September, 








1,674,000,000 


55,800,000 


42,100,000 


92,400,000 


15.07 


44,600,000 


October, . 








1,441,000,000 


46,500,000 


36,800,000 


61,600,000 


15.44 


50,200,000 


November, 








1,580,600,000 


52,700,000 


35,400,000 


137,500,000 


15.16 


48,200,000 


December, 








1,949,900,000 


62,900,000 


47,600,000 


107,100,000 


15.16 


51,700,000 


Total, 


21,331,900,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 








- 


58,600,000 


44,300,000 


96,700,000 


15.62 


48,600,000 



168 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impellers or wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 
8.25 feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: two, 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift; one 
60,000,000 gallons, with 8-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 51,000,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 32,100,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: Davis and New Eiver, costing from $3.70 to $3,995 per gross ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown 
Pumping Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1909. 

January, . ' . 


1,014,200,000 


32,700,000 


24,300,000 


51,000,000 


8.26 


50,000,000 


February, 








1,060,800,000 


37,900,000 


27,600,000 


61,900,000 


8.26 


51,000,000 


March, 








1,065,700,000 


34,400,000 


26,300,000 


46,700,000 


8.25 


48,900,000 


April, 








1,031,800,000 


34,400,000 


27,500,000 


54,800,000 


8.23 


49,700,000 


May, 








978,400,000 


31,600,000 


24,100,000 


47,200,000 


8.15 


50,300,000 


June, 








969,500,000 


32,300,000 


24,900,000 


45,000,000 


8.05 


53,600,000 


July, 








894,300,000 


28,800,000 


23,500,000 


37,700,000 


8.04 


50,700,000 


August, . 








941,400,000 


30,400,000 


24,100,000 


49,100,000 


8.18 


54,400,000 


September, 








934,900,000 


31,200,000 


22,900,000 


52,900,000 


8.12 


52,800,000 


October, . 








825,500,000 


26,600,000 


21,300,000 


36,500,000 


7.98 


48,500,000 


November, 








892,700,000 


29,800,000 


22,800,000 


60,500,000 


7.83 


50,000,000 


December, 








1,069,500,000 


34,500,000 


26,800,000 


61,900,000 


8.08 


52,600,000 


Total, 


11,678,700,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 








- 


32,100,000 


24,700,000 


50,400,000 


8.12 


51,000,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



169 



Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 
The plant at this station consists of the original installation of 
small commercial, pumps and engines, i.e., two 9-inch Andrews verti- 
cal centrifugal pumps, with direct-connected compound marine en- 
gines, together with the recent additions. The latter consists of a 

O 7 O 

specially designed engine of the vertical cross-compound type, hav- 
ing between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a horizontal 
axis. 

Contract capacity of the two original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13-foot 
lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 18,100,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,358,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 2 screenmen, and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland and Davis, costing from $4.23 to $4.56 per 
gross ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook 
Pumping Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1909. 

January, . 




89,826,000 


2,898,000 


2,330,000 


5,106,000 


12.99 


16,200,000 


February, 








127,813,000 


4,565,000 


2,645,000 


7,757,000 


12.54 


20,500,000 


March, 








157,701,000 


5,100,000 


3,478,000 


7,580,000 


12.68 


24,300,000 


April, 








127,351,000 


4,245,000 


3,279,000 


6,813,000 


12.70 


21,000,000 


May, 








115,830,000 


3,736,000 


2,978,000 


5,882,000 


12.72 


18,900,000 


June, 








107,559,000 


3,585,000 


2,550,000 


6,206,000 


12.56 


20,300,000 


July, 








77,854,000 


2,511,000 


2,078,000 


3,766,000 


12.91 


17,700,000 


August, . 








63,007,000 


2,033,000 


1,616,000 


3,622,000 


12.78 


14,300,000 


September, 








74,542,000 


2,485,000 


1,784,000 


4,983,000 


12.78 


15,200,000 


October, . 








68,228,000 


2,201,000 


1,868,000 


2,598,000 


12.84 


13,600,000 


November, 








80,453,000 


2,682,000 


1,952,000 


7,167,000 


12.71 


15,400,000 


December, 








132,156,000 


4,263,000 


3,330,000 


7,344,000 


12.63 


20,100,000 


Total, 


. 


1,222,320,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 




- 


3,358,000 


2,491,000 


5,735,000 


12.74 


18,100,000 



170 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



South Metropolitan System. 






[Pub. Doc. 






Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping en- 
gines, of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, 
the plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch 
stroke. 

Contract capacity of pumps : 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 84,200,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 22,700,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 4 engineers, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 4 assistant engineers, 1 machinist 

and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: Davis and New Eiver, costing from $4.20 to $4.62 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street 
Pumping Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1909 

January, . 




630,600,000 


20,300,000 


12,400,000 


28,100,000 


40.70 


82,000,000 


February, 






846,500,000 


30,200,000 


14,900,000 


38,000,000 


42.10 


101,800,000 


March, 






950,000,000 


30,600,000 


18,900,000 


33,400,000 


41.34 


97,400,000 


April, 






869,800,000 


29,000,000 


19,000,000 


31,200,000 


41.47 


90,400,000 


May, 






866,000,000 


27,900,000 


16,400,000 


29,100,000 


41.09 


87,900,000 


June, 






707,300,000 


23,500,000 


16,500,000 


24,500,000 


40.64 


86,400,000 


July, 






595,400,000 


19,200,000 


11,400,000 


22,500,000 


39.86 


76,400,000 


August, . 






542,600,000 


17,500,000 


9,500,000 


26,500,000 


39.78 


72,500,000 


September, 






568,800,000 


19,000,000 


12,600,000 


23,700,000 


40.00 


71,300,000 


October, . 






486,500,000 


15,700,000 


13,000,000 


16,500,000 


39.64 


70,500,000 


November, 






567,900,000 


18,900,000 


13,000,000 


34,300,000 


40.07 


85,300,000 


December, 






644,200,000 


20,800,000 


16,400,000 


33,400,000 


40.21 


88,700,000 


Total, 


8,275,600,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


22,700,000 


14,500,000 


28,400,000 


40.57 


84,200,000 



Records from plunger displacement. 
Average slip for the year about 11.0 per cent. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



171 



Quincy Pumping Station. 
At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 3,000,000 Deane; 5,000,000 Deane; 10,000,000 Law- 
rence centrifugal. 
Average duty for the year: 34,200,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day : 4,163,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 2 screenmen and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: Davis, costing from $4,055 to $4.48 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average % 
Duty (ft.-lbs. 
per 100 lbs. 
Coal). 


1909. 
January, .... 
February, 

March, .... 
April, . . . . 
May, .... 
June, .... 

July 

August, .... 

September, 

October, .... 

November, 

December, 


121,197,000 
137,470,000 
159,864,000 
155,406,000 
150,350,000 
124,579,000 
116,935,000 
109,445,000 
107,305,000 
108,163,000 
100,150,000 
126,890,000 


3,910,000 
4,910,000 
5,157,000 
5,180,000 
4,850,000 
4,152,000 
3,772,000 
3,530,000 
3,577,000 
3,489,000 
3,338,000 
4,093,000 


3,020,000 
3,870,000 
4,410,000 
4,650,000 
4,025,000 
3,500,000 
3,320,000 
3,080,000 
3,245,000 
2,940,000 
2,770,000 
3,720,000 


4,530,000 
6,660,000 
6,410,000 
5,772,000 
5,460,000 
4,685,000 
4,300,000 
3,900,000 
4,100,000 
5,000,000 
5,100,000 
4,670,000 


20.95 
21.15 
21.20 
21.18 
21.24 
21.24 
21.23 
21.22 
21.24 
21.00 
21.24 
21.18 


30,800,000 
30,300,000 
30,800,000 
34,900,000 
36,900,000 
37,300,000 
37,000,000 
35,800,000 
35,800,000 
34,100,000 
34,300,000 
32,500,000 


Total, 
Average, . 


1,517,754,000 


4,163,000 


3,546,000 


5,049,000 


21.17 


34,200,000 



Nut Island Screen House. 
The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate, 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two ver- 
tical Deane boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat for the house and burn materials intercepted at the screens. 

Average quantity of sewage passing screens daily, 40,400,000 gallons. 
Total materials intercepted at screens during the past year, 1,026 cubic yards. 
Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharge, 1.88 cubic feet. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: 383.9 tons Davis and New River, costing from $3,815 to $4,185 per 
gross ton. 



172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Cost of Pumping. 

In the following tables the total cost of pumping and the rate per 
million foot-gallons at each of six pumping stations are shown in 
detail : — 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island 

Station. 

Volume (22,061.9 Million Gallons) X Lift (10.56 Feet) = 232,974 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 


Labor, 


§11,914 68 


$0.05114 


Coal 


9,202 34 


.03950 


Oil, 


185 34 


.00080 




89 32 


.00038 




1,351 68 


.00580 




169 12 


.00073 




1,105 31 


.00474 


Totals, 


$24,017 79 


$0.10309 




- 


.01172 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston 

Station. 

Volume (21,331.9 Million Gallons) X Lift (15.62 Feet) = 333,204 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, ...... 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



$15,537 48 

10,743 62 

316 67 

70 23 

1,703 34 

47 88 

1,215 12 



$29,634 34 



$0.04663 
.03224 
.00095 
.00021 
.00511 
.00014 
.00365 



$0.08893 
.00819 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



173 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown 

Station. 



Volume (11,678.7 Million Gallons) X Lift (8.12 Feet) z 


= 94,831 Million Foot-gallons. 


Items. 


Cost. 


Cost 
per Million 
Foot-gallons. 






$11,608 56 


$0.12241 


Coal 




3,528 59 


.03721 


Oil, 




172 56 


.00182 






92 95 


.00098 






405 60 


.00428 






9 06 


.00009 






1,036 49 


.01093 


Totals, . . * 


$16,853 81 


$0.17772 






- 


.02879 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook 

Station. 

Volume (1,222.32 MilMon Gallons) X Lift (12.74 Feet) = 15,572 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 
Coal, 
Oil, . 



Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



$5,796 90 

1,528 60 

112 98 

45 43 

207 40 

27 31 

495 73 



5,214 35 



.37226 
.09816 
.00726 
.00292 
.01332 
.00175 
.03183 



.52750 
.11688 



174 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street 

Station. 

Volume (8,275.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (40.57 Feet) = 335,741 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil, 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



$14,483 27 

7,882 49 

268 06 

28 76 

1,443 60 

188 12 

1,686 00 



$25,980 30 



.04314 
.02348 
.00080 
.00009 
.00430 
.00056 
.00501 



.07738 
.01265 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,517.8 Million Gallons) X Lift (21.17 Feet) =32,132 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 
Coal, 



Oil, 



Waste 

Water, 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



$4,731 30 

1,529 11 

23 69 

10 96 

229 80 

27 45 

140 29 



$6,692 60 



). 14724 
.04759 
.00074 
.00034 
.00715 
.00085 
.00437 






80.20828 
.04862 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



175 



Coal for use at the several stations has been purchased as fol- 
lows : — 







Gross Tons 


Bituminous Coal. 




m 
m 
O 




g 

'ft 

S 

Ph 

d . 

£ a 

aj O 
*■< F? 

S£ 
Q 


d 
"3, 

£ 
d 
Ph 

a 
o 

m C 
O O 
W£ 


M 

d 
'S 

S 

Ph 

d 
£ . 

m O 

©43 


ft 

S 
d 

Ph 
M ■ 

o a 
2.2 

<p.d 
3' 


M 

a 
'S. 

S 

3 
Ph 

0Q.2 

t-> -^ 


02 

bU 

a 
'a 

£ 

d 

Ph 
>> . 

d o 

"3 '-5 


d 
a 

d 


a 

u 

ID 
ft 

_o 

"C 

Ph 

+= 
o 

H a 

IS 

U 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


436.3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$3 64 


Davis Coal and Coke Company, 


- 


1,684.943 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 69 


New England Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Staples Coal Company, 


1,219.25 


1,003.084 


"" 


_ 


: 


: 


- 


3 69 
3 74 


Staples Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


200 


3 74 


Davis Coal and Coke Company, 


- 


- 


420.218 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 95 


New England Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Staples Coal Company, 


- 


_ 


58.078 


_ 


700.302 


_ 


: 


3 95 

4 09 


Davis Coal and Coke Company, 


402.55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 15 


New England Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Neponset River Coal Company, 


1,115.397 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


144.967 


; 


4 15 
4 15 


New England Coal and Coke 

Company. 
New England Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Davis Coal and Coke Company, 


- 


— 


: 


67.249 


- 


— 


200 


4 20 
4 25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


782.959 


- 


- 


4 41 


New England Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Davis Coal and Coke Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


140.577 


- 


- 


4 41 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


87.90 


- 


4 45 


New England Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Locke Coal Company, 


— 


— 


_ 


221.556 


— 


116.598 


_ 


4 45 
4 50 


Total gross tons, 


2,737.197 


2,688.027 


914.596 


288.805 


1,623.838 


349.465 


400 


- 


Average price per gross ton, . 


$3 97 


$3 69 


$3 80 


$4 44 


$4 27 


$4 33 


$3 97 


- 



NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

Shirley Gut Siphon. 

During the year the continued dredging in the harbor in the vi- 
cinity of Shirley G-ut has resulted in marked changes in the bed of 
the harbor near the siphon crossing from Point Shirley to Deer Island. 
For a length of about 50 feet from the head-house on the Winthrop 
end, the roof of the sewer siphon had been practically uncovered. 



176 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

During the year heavy riprap has been placed around the head-house 
and over the line of the siphon to defend against further moving of 
the material in the vicinity of this siphon. 

Siphon under Alewipe Brook. 

At the request of the Metropolitan Park Commissioners, who are 
modifying the channel of Alewife Brook, the 15-inch Metropolitan 
branch sewer to Arlington, near the Lexington Branch Railroad, has 
been modified by the introduction of siphon pipes under the new 
channel of the brook. Two lines of cast-iron pipe, embedded in 
Portland concrete, have been substituted for the original 15-inch pipe 
sewer. The siphon pipes are so arranged that the dry-weather sewage 
flow is concentrated in the smaller pipe, 6 inches in diameter, and 
the larger pipe, 10 inches in diameter, will not be used until the 
smaller pipe has become surcharged to a depth of 6 inches. 

The siphon pipes are 54 feet in length, and, with the manholes at 
the ends of the pipe, involve changes over a length of 72 feet, of 
which 28 feet was on the Arlington sewer. At the ends of the pipes 
the controlling manholes provide for stop-planks and valves to aid in 
flushing the siphon pipes if they should become clogged. The effect 
of this siphon arrangement is to dam up the lower end of the 18-inch 
local sewer about 6 inches, reducing its carrying capacity to approxi- 
mately that of a 15-inch pipe. 

This work was begun early in November. At that date the water 
in Alewife Brook was at low level and controlled by pumps of con- 
tractors for the Metropolitan Park Commissioners, operating in that 
vicinity. Shortly after our operations began the contractors aban- 
doned their pumping plants, and this siphon work has been carried 
out under very adverse conditions of floods in the brook and on sur- 
rounding meadows. 

At the date of this report the excavation has been completed and 
the siphon pipes placed. It is anticipated that as early as the first 
of February the work will be fully completed. 

Pipes under Cambridge Subway. 

.Under authority of chapter 520, Acts of 1906, the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company is constructing a subway through Main Street, 
in the city of Cambridge. The Cambridge branch of the Metropolitai 






No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 177 

Sewer crosses the line of this subway at Portland Street, and the 
invert of the Metropolitan Sewer is 6 feet above the invert elevation 
of the subway. The work of passing the Metropolitan Sewer under 
the subway has been carried out during the year by the Elevated 
Railway Company. 

At the subway crossing the Metropolitan Sewer is about 4 feet 
6 inches in diameter. There is a wide variation between the ordi- 
nary dry-weather and storm flows in this sewer. For passing the 
sewage flow under the subway two lines of cast-iron pipes have been 
placed during the year, — one 20 inches in diameter for the ordinary 
dry- weather flow, and one 36 inches in diameter, at a higher eleva- 
tion, for storm flows. The pipes are about 50 feet in length and 
embedded in Portland concrete. The ends of the pipes above and 
below the subway are at the same elevation. Masonry structures 
above and below the subway provide flushing valves, stop-planks and 
sand sumps for flushing and cleaning and intercepting heavy material 
that would not be desirable to pass through the pipes. 

While the work of placing the pipes was in progress, the sewage 
flow was concentrated in a wooden box near the easterly side of the 
sewer. This work was started early in September, and at the date 
of this report the excavation for the pipes has been made, the pipes 
placed, and the masonry chambers at both ends of the pipes nearly 
completed. It seems probable that the sewage flow may be turned 
through these pipes early in January. 

This arrangement of pipes under this subway, with ends at the 
same elevation, adopted by the Railway Company, will involve 
additional cost in the maintenance of this Metropolitan branch sewer, 
and result in a substantial reduction in its carrying capacity above 
this location. 

Tannery Drainage in Winchester and Woburn. 

During the year much labor and expense have been involved in 
the care of Metropolitan Sewers in Winchester and Woburn. This 
tannery drainage is rapidly increasing in quantity and its character 
has been substantially changed within the last few years. 



178 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



New Pumps at Alewife Brook Station. 

During the year two 9-inch Andrews centrifugal pumps have been 
introduced, replacing two old pumps of the same size. The cast- 
iron shells of the old pumps had been worn through. The old pumps 
had been in service about sixteen years. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

The extension of the High-Level Sewer through West Roxbury, 
Brookline and Brighton, authorized by chapter 406 of the Acts of 
1906, was completed early in the year and opened for service. Dur- 
ing the year ten connections have been made with the extension by 
the town of Brookline, providing for 1,850 acres of its territory, 
located generally south of the Metropolitan Sewer. 

South Metropolitan Outfalls. 

The 60-inch outfall pipes in the harbor have been in operation 
Rye years at the date of this report. These pipes are in normal 
condition and free from deposit. During the past year the average 
flow through them has been 40,400,000 gallons of sewage per day, 
with a maximum rate of 135,500,000 gallons in the month of Feb- 
ruary, 1909. 

In October, the diving contractor who placed the 60-inch outfall 
pipes in the harbor near Nut Island examined these outfalls. He 
entered the pipes for about 100 feet; he reports the pipes clean and 
the outfalls in satisfactory condition. 

Late in 1908 two Sturtevant electrical generating sets of about 
15 horse power capacity each, were introduced at the Nut Island 
screen-house. These generators have been in successful operation 
during the year. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metropolitan 
sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating mat- 
ters, has during the year amounted to 2,400 cubic yards. This is 
equivalent to 2.9 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage pumped 
at Deer Island. 






No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 179 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropolitan 
sewerage stations has amounted to 2,342.3 cubic yards, equal to 4.3 
cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall 
works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers, siphons and 
outfall pipes indicate that they are free from deposit. 

Respectfully submitted, 



WM. M. BROWN, 

Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works. 

Boston, January 1, 1910. 



APPENDIX. 



182 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No . 1 . 



Feb. 


7, 


1895. 


June 


5, 


1895. 


July 


19, 


1895. 


Dec. 


27, 


1895. 


Jan. 


4, 


1896. 



1896. 



Statement of Important Events in the Construction and Operation 
of the Metropolitan Water Works to January, 1, 1910. 

Metropolitan Water Supply, State Board of Health directed 

to investigate and report a system, .... June 9, 1893. 

Metropolitan Water Supply, Report of State Board of Health 

made to Legislature, . . . 
Metropolitan Water Act passed, ...... 

Metropolitan Water Board organized, ..... 

Metropolitan Water Supply, first contract made by the Board 

(water pipes), ........ 

Sudbury Reservoir, first taking of land made, 

Sudbury Reservoir (partially constructed) , taken from city 

of Boston, ......... Jan. 

Wachusett Reservoir, first purchase of lands made (Shaw 

Place, inBoylston), ....... 

Wachusett Aqueduct, first contract made, 

Main water pipes, laying begun, ..... 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, contract for 

engine made, ........ 

Sudbury Reservoir, filling with water begun, 
Quincy, admitted into Metropolitan Water District, 
Wachusett Reservoir, first contract made, .... 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, addition begun, . 

Chestnut Hill low -service pumping station, contract for three 

engines made, ........ 

Wachusett Aqueduct, Assabet Bridge completed, . 
Boston Water Works, taken by Metropolitan Water Board, . 
Spot Pond, taken by Metropolitan Water Board, . 
Metropolitan Water Works, first operated for supplying Dis- 
trict, .......... 

Mystic Water Works, discontinued for regular supply, . 
New 48-inch main connecting Chestnut Hill and Spot Pond, 

completed, ......... Jan. 13, 

Wachusett Reservoir, waters of South Branch of Nashua 

River and Sandy Pond taken, ..... 

Wachusett Aqueduct, substantially completed, 
Wachusett Aqueduct, water of South Branch of Nashua River 

diverted, ......... 

Sudbury Reservoir, filled with water, ..... 



Jan. 


29, 


1896. 


Feb. 


14, 


1896. 


May 


11, 


1896. 


Jan. 


1, 


1897. 


Feb. 


8, 


1897. 


June 


24, 


1897. 


July 


14, 


1897. 


Sept. 


22, 


1897. 


Oct. 


20, 


1897. 


Nov. 


6, 


1897. 


Jan. 


1, 


1898. 


Jan. 


1, 


1898. 


Jan. 


1, 


1898. 


Jan. 


1, 


1898. 



1898. 



Feb. 


23, 


1898. 


Mar. 


7, 


1898. 


Mar. 


7, 


1898. 


April 




1898. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



183 



Fells Reservoir, construction begun, ..... 
Wachusett Reservoir, agreement made for acquisition of St. 

John's Catholic Cemetery in Clinton, .... 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, contract for build- 
ing; made, ......... 

Nahant, admitted into Metropolitan Water District, 
Spot Pond pumping station, contract for engine made, . 
Swampscott, agreement made to supply with water, 
Sudbury Reservoir, substantially completed, .... 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, new engine first 

operated, ......... 

Quincy, supplied with water, ...... 

Spot Pond pumping station, contract for building made, 

Arlington, admitted into Metropolitan Water District, 

West Roxbury pumping station, used under an agreement 

made with City of Boston, ...... 

Spot Pond, improvement begun, ...... 

Sudbury Reservoir, Marlborough Brook filter-beds first used, 
Nahant, supplied with water, ...... 

Swampscott, supplied with water, ..... 

Arlington, supplied with water, ...... 

Fells Reservoir, placed in service, ..... 

Clinton sewerage system, first operated, .... 

Spot Pond pumping station, engine moved from Mystic 

station first operated, . . ... 
Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, first engine 

operated, ......... 

Spot Pond, refilling with water begun, ..... 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and foundation for standpipe, in Quincy, 

construction begun, . . . . . 

Weston Aqueduct, first lands bought, . . . . . 

Spot Pond, improvement substantially completed, . 
Wachusett Dam, contract made, ...... 

Boston low-service district, supplied with additional pressure, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, purchased from City of Newton, 

Boston Water Works, settlement for taking made, 

Spot Pond pumping station, new engine first operated, . 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, first placed in service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, completed, . . 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established by 

Legislature, ......... 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, completed, . 
Weston Aqueduct, first contracts for construction made, 
Stoneham, admitted into Metropolitan Water District, . 
Wachusett Dam, first stone laid, ...... 

Metropolitan Water District, method of assessment changed, . 



May 


20, 


1898. 


July 


1, 


1898. 


Aug. 


26, 


1898. 


Sept. 


13, 


1898. 


Sept. 


20, 


1898. 


Dec. 


2, 


1898. 


Dec. 


9, 


1898. 


Dec. 


11, 


1898. 


Dec. 


31, 


1898. 


Jan. 


7, 


1899. 


Jan. 


31 


1899 


Jan. 


31, 


1899. 


April 


10, 


1899. 


June 




1899. 


June 


29, 


1899. 


June 


29, 


1899. 


June 


30, 


1899. 


Aug. 


31, 


1899. 


Sept. 


15, 


1899. 


Mar. 


7, 


1900. 


June 


1, 


1900. 


July 


12, 


1900. 


July 


16, 


1900. 


Sept. 


10, 


1900. 


Sept. 


15, 


1900. 


Oct. 


1, 


1900. 


Oct. 


7, 


1900. 


Oct. 


12, 


1900. 


Nov. 


1, 


1900. 


Nov. 


1, 


1900. 


Dec. 


31, 


1900. 


Feb. 


9, 


1901. 


Mar. 


20, 


1901. 


April 


3, 


1901. 


May 


9, 


1901. 


May 


23, 


1901. 


June 


5, 


1901. 


June 


13, 


1901. 



184 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Bear Hill Reservoir, construction begun, .... 
Lake Cochituate, improvement of Snake Brook Meadow begun, 
Forbes Hill Reservoir, first filled with water, 
Lake Cochituate, improvement of Pegan Meadow begun, 
Stoneham, supplied with water, ..... 
Lake Cochituate, improvement of Snake Brook Meadow com 

pleted, ......... 

Milton, supplied with water, ..... 

Weston Aqueduct, construction of reservoir begun, 
Relocation of Central Massachusetts R.R., agreement with 

Boston & Maine R.R. made, ..... 
Measuring water supplied to cities and towns, Act passed, 
Bear Hill Reservoir, first filled with water, . 
Relocation of Central Massachusetts R.R., contract for viaduct 

over Nashua River made, ..... 
Wachusett Aqueduct, water first introduced from Wachusett 

Reservoir, ........ 

Lake Cochituate, improvement of Pegan Meadow completed, 
Spot Pond Brook, report on improvement made to Legislature, 
Lexington, supplied with water, ...... 

Lexington, admitted into Metropolitan Water District, . 
Milton, admitted into Metropolitan Water District, 
Relocation of Central Massachusetts R.R., new road bed first 

used, . . . . ... 

Venturi meters for measurement of water supplied to cities 

and towns, installed, ....... 

Weston Aqueduct, Pipe Arch Bridge over Sudbury River 

completed, . . . . 

Weston Aqueduct, water first introduced, . . . . 

Report on Consumption and Waste of Water made to Legis- 
lature, .......... 

Spot Pond Brook, Act for improvement passed, 
Metropolitan Water District, method of assessment changed, 
Wachusett Reservoir, North Dike completed, 
Wachusett Dam, Lower Gate Chamber completed, 
Wachusett Reservoir, Worcester Street embankment and arch 

bridge completed, ........ 

Wachusett Dam, last stone laid, ...... 

Wachusett Reservoir, South Dike completed, 

Wachusett Dam, contract work completed, . . . . 

Metropolitan Water District, method of assessment changed, . 
Spot Pond, settlement for taking made, . . . . 

Wachusett Reservoir, Sterling filter-beds put into operation, . 
Metropolitan Water District, installation of service meters 

required, ......... 

Arlington pumping station, completed, ..... 



July 27, 1901. 

Aug. 21, 1901. 

Sept. 27, 1901. 

Sept. 28, 1901. 

Oct. 21, 1901. 

Jan. 22, 1902. 
Feb. 28, 1902. 
April 1, 1902. 

April 3, 1902. 
May 13, 1902. 
June 22, 1902. 

July 23, 1902. 

Nov. 20, 1902. 

Dec. 20, 1902. 

Jan. 15, 1903. 

Jan. 24, 1903. 

Feb. 13, 1903. 

Mar. 10, 1903. 

June 15, 1903. 

June 27, 1903. 

Oct. 19, 1903. 
Dec. 29, 1903. 

Feb. 11, 1904. 

June 3, 1904. 

June 4, 1904. 

Nov. 18, 1904. 

Dec. 22, 1904. 

Dec. 24, 1904. 

July 22, 1905. 

Sept. 30, 1905. 

Feb. 27, 1906. 

June 6, 1906. 

July 9, 1906. 

May 23, 1907. 

June 15, 1907. 
July 19, 1907. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 185 

Wachusett Reservoir, Sterling Junction filter-beds put into 

operation, ......... Sept. 16, 1907. 

Arlington pumping station, new engine placed in service, . Dec. 4, 1907. 

Wachusett Reservoir, first filled to high-water mark, . . May 10, 1908. 

New 48-inch main from Chestnut Hill Reservoir for Boston 

low service begun, ....... Sept. 16, 1908. 

Swampscott, admitted into Metropolitan Water District, . May 3, 1909. 

New 48-inch main from Chestnut Hill Reservoir for Boston 

low service completed, ....... July 10, 1909. 

60-inch main from Weston Aqueduct terminus into Metropoli- 
tan District begun, Aug. 26, 1909. 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, contract for new 

engine for high service made, . . . . , Sept. 21, 1909. 






186 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix ~N o . 2. 



Contracts made and pending during 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


2991 


4,160 tons cast-iron water 
pipes ; 4,100 tons 48-inch, 
60 tons 36-inch ; 130 tons 
special castings. 


3 


$103,831 00 


$99,164 002 


Warren Foundry and 
Machine Co., "Phil- 
lipsburg, N. J. 


2 


3001 


36 water valves; 836-inch, 
4 24-inch, 2 20-inch, 22 12- 
inch. 


4 


11,108 00 


9,750 002 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 


3 


3011 


18 water valves ; 1036-inch, 
8 12-inch. 


3 


7,240 00 


7,124 002 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 


4 


302 


4,000 tons 60-inch cast-iron 
water pipes. 


1 




98,800 002,3 


United States Cast 
Iron Pipe and 
Foundry Co., New 
York, N. Y. 


5 


3031 


2,270 tons cast-iron water 
pipes; 1,530 tons 24-inch, 
630 tons 16-inch, 100 tons 
12 inch, 10 tons 6-inch; 
50 tons special castings. 


4 


55,618 00 


54,018 002 


Standard Cast Iron 
Pipe and Foundry 
Co., Bristol, Pa. 


6 


3041 


Laying water pipes in 
Boston and Brookline, 
Sect. 31 of the distribu- 
tion system. 


11 


36,157 502 


32,791 00 


Bruno & Petitti, Bos- 
ton. 


7 


305 


4,000 tons, 60-inch cast- 
iron water pipes. 


1 


- 


98,800 002,3 


Florence Iron Works, 
Camden, N. J. 


8 


306 


200 tons special castings. 


2 


14,640 00 


9,400 002 


Standard Cast Iron 
Pipe and Foundry 
Co., Bristol, Pa. 


9 


3071 


Laying 3,900 feet of 16- 
inch water pipes in 
Revere, Sect. 32 of the 
distribution system. 


10 


3,298 00 


3,111 50 2 


Camoia & Williams, 
Boston. 


10 


308 


Laying 12,300 feet of 24- 
inch water pipes in 
Everett, Chelsea and 
Revere, Sect. 33 of the 
distribution system. 


9 


14,212 00 


13,197 50 2 


Camoia & Williams, 
Boston. 


11 


309 1 


Laying 1,600 feet of 12- 
inch water pipes in 
Arlington, Sect. 34 of 
the distribution system. 


15 


2,041 40 


1,884 40 2 


Angelo De Marco & 
Co., Boston. 












i Contract completed. 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



187 



Appendix No. 2. 



the Year 1909 — Water Works. 

1909 have been given in previous reports.] 



7. 



Date 
of Contract. 



Date of 

-Completion of 

Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1909. 



10. 

Value of "Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1909. 



Aug. 1, '08, Aug. 4, '09, 



May 21, '09, 

Aug. 26, '08, 

May 14, '09, 

May 7, '09, 

Sept. 5, '08, 

May 14, '09, 

May 14, '09, 

July 16, '09, 

July 16, '09, 



Aug. 12, '09, 



Nov. 15, '09, 



Feb. 17, '09, 



36-inch valves $755; 24-inch valves $270; 20-inch 
valves $215; 12-inch valves " 



Nov. 16, '09, 



July 22, '09, 



60-inch pipe $24.70 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



24-inch pipe $22.65; 16-inch pipe $22.95; 12-inch 
pipe $23.20; 6-inch pipe $23.50; special castings 
$47 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



Sept. 21, '09, 



Oct. 26, '09, 



60-inch pipe $24.70 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



Special castings $47 per ton of 2,000 pounds. 



For laying 16-inch cast-iron pipe, $0.72 per lin. 
ft.; for chambers for blow-offs and air valves 
$75 each. 



For laying cast-iron pipe: 24-inch, $0.90 per lin. 
ft. ; 12-inch, 16-inch and 20-inch for connections, 
$0.50 per lin. ft.; for rock excavation above 
regular grade, $4 per cu. yd. ; for chambers 
for 20-inch and 24-inch valve3, $90 each; for 
chambers for 16-inch valves and smaller $75 
each. 

For laying 12-inch cast-iron pipe, $0.53 per lin. 
ft.; for rock excavation, $3.49 per cu. yd. 



$101,990 55 

9,750 00 

7,198 00 

73,013 00 

55,984 50 

38,909 55 

50,684 00 

4,840 00 

3,431 99 

14,921 27 



1,822 56 



10 



11 



s Joint bid for 8,000 tons was made for contracts Nos.302 and 305. 



188 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the 



Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2. 

WORK. 



1 


310 


2 


311 1 


3 


312 


4 


11-M.i 


5 


12-M.i 


6 


14-M.i 


7 


15-M.i 


8 


16-M. 


9 


17-M. 


10 


18-M.i 



Laying 8,070 feet of 60- 
inch water pipes in 
Boston and Newton, 
Sect. 8 of the supply 
pipe lines. 

60-inch Yenturi meter 
tube. 



40,000,000-gallon pump- 
ing engine. 

6,000 tons Vulcan coal for 
Chestnut Hill Pumping 
Station. 

1,300 tons Davis coal; 900 
tons for Spot Pond 
Pumping Station, 400 
tons for Arlington 
Pumping Station. 

60-inch vertical fire tube 
boiler for West R ox- 
bury Pumping Station. 

Addition to West Rox- 
bury Pumping Station. 

650 tons Davis coal; 250 
tons for Arlington 
Pumping Station; 400 
tons for Spot Pond 
Pumping Station. 

7,500 tons Vulcan coal for 
the Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Stations. 

355 tons cast-iron water 
pipes, 30 tons special 
castings. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



10 



4 
10 



2 

4 

10 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to Low- 
est. 



Lowest. 



$37,044 50 



105,700 00 



$4.50 and 

S4.10 per 

ton. 



$890 00 



1,727 17 



$3.83 and 

$4.35 per 

ton. 



$3.70 per 
ton. 



$10,363 42 



834,908 602 



99,769 002 



$3.85 per $3,752 and 
ton. $3.85 per 

ton. 



6. 

Contractor. 



$4,192 and 

$3.95 per 

ton. 



$737 00 2 



1,720 002 



$3,702 and 

$4.20 per 

ton. 



.59 2 per 
ton. 



$10,24S 50 2 



Charles J. Jacobs Co., 
Boston. 



Builders Iron Foun- 
d r y, Providence, 
R. I. 

Holly Mfg. Co., Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Spring Coal Co., Bos 
ton. 






Davis Coal and Coke 
Co., Boston. 



Hodge Boiler Works, 
East Boston. 



John A. Rooney, Bos 
ton. 






New England Coal 
and Coke Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Spring Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Warren Foundry and 
Machine Co., Phil- 
lipsburg, N. J. 



i Contract completed. 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



189 



Year 1909 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




Date 
of Contract. 


Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 


Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1909. 


Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1909. 




Aug. 18, '09, 


~ 


For laying 60-inch cast-iron pipe, $3.03 per lin. 
ft.; for rock excavation above regular grade, 
$3.15 per cu. yd.; for chambers, for blow-offs 
and by-pass valves, $100 each; for concrete 
masonry, $5 per cu. yd. 


$25,902 53 


1 


June 21, '09, 


Oct. 26, '09, 


For whole work $2,350. 


2,350 00 


2 


Sept. 21, '09, 


- 


For whole work $99,769. 


- 


3 


July 1, '08, 


July 2, '09, 


- 


12,994 31 


4 


July 13, '08, 


July 9, '09, 


- 


1,473 36 


5 


Apr. 22, '09, 


July 13, '09, 


For whole work $737. 


737 00 


6 


May 4, '09, 


Sept. 21, '09, 


For whole work $1,720. 


1,720 00 


7 


June 18, '09, 


- 


$3. 70 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at 
the Arlington Pumping Station; $4.20 per ton 
of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at the Spot 
Pond Pumping Station. 


2,231 95 


8 


July 16, '09, 


- 


$3.59 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars at 
the Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 


12,919 87 


9 


Oct. 18, '09, 


Dec. 3, '09, 


48-inch cast-iron pipes $25 per ton of 2,000 
pounds; special castings $50 per ton of 2,000 
pounds. 


11,756 39 


10 



4 Competitive bids were not received. 



190 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1909 — Water Works 

— Concluded. 
Summary of Contracts. 1 



Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1909. 



Distribution Department, 14 contracts, 

293 contracts completed from 1896 to 1908, inclusive 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the City of Boston, . 
Total of 318 contracts 

i In this summary, contracts charged to maintenance are excluded 



$390,797 95 
15,838,951 22 



$16,229,749 17 
512,000 00 



$15,717,749 17 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 191 



Appendix JST o . 3. 



Cement Tests — Metropolitan Water Works. 

The following tables contain : — 

1. Long-time tests of cements used on construction work by the Dam and 
Aqueduct and Reservoir departments, from 1896 to 1900, inclusive. 

2. Tests of cements used in the construction of the Wachusett Dam and other 
works at the Wachusett Reservoir, from 1901 to 1907, inclusive. 

3. Tests of cements used in the construction of distributing works, from 1896 
to 1909, inclusive. 

The methods of testing were the same as described in Appendix ~No. 3 of the 
annual report for the year 1897. 



192 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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22.0 
24.4 
21.3 
27.5 


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Number of 

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•bib^ox 


491 

355 
3,793 

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Union, . 


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Alpha, . 

Alsen, . 

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Catskill, 

Giant, . 

Helderberg, 

Iron Clad, . 

Lehigh, 

Star, . 

Stettin-Girstow, 

Whitehall, . 


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Atlas, 
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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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198 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



199 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1909. 



Day of Month. 






P 
be 
P 
< 



2 

0.79 



0.123 
0.521 
0.303 

2 

1.383 



0.493 

2 

0.271 



0.213 



0.09 



0.28 



0.06 



- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1.39 


- 


2 


2 


2.003 


0.62 


- 


2 


- 


0.411 


- 


- 


- 



2 2 

* o.60 



0.413 
2 I 0.071 
2 I 0.161 

1.243 



2 

0.131 



2 

3.30 



0.33 

2 

0.31 

0.58 



1.60 



0.17 



0.23 



2 

1.27 



0.23 



0.34 



0.27 



0.61 



0.10 



0.83 



2.45 



0.403 



4.14 



6.29 



4.57 



0.84 

2 

0.47 = 



2.56 



0.54 



0.21 



0.49 



0.67 



0.45 

2 
2 

2.42 

0.08 



0.65 



2 
2 

0.48 



6.13 



2.31 



0.08 



3.22 



1.04 
0.64 



0.11 



0.30 



5.29 



4.22 



2 

0.65 



2 

1.81 



0.43 



0.15 



2 

0.27 



0.36 



1.1 



0.33 



4.13 



2 

0.58 

2 

0.87 



2.03 



2 
2 
2 
2 
1.103 



0.19 



1.89 



2 

2.091 



4.41 



i Snow. 



Total for the year 48.63 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. a R a i n and snow. 



200 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1909. 



Day of Month. 


>> 

u 
a 

3 
C 

3 


>> 

3 

s 
u 
,0 






u 

a 

3 


u 

a, 

< 


>> 
3 




a 


jA 

^ 


< 


u 

a 

-*3 
® 

02 


u 

.a 


O 


,0 

a 

> 



u 

a 


1, • 








- 


- 


2 


- 


0.30 


- 


- 


- 


0.21 


- 


- 


- 


2, • 








- 


- 


0.24 3 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


3, • 








- 


- 


2 


0.25 


0.08 


- 


0.14 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4, • 








2 


- 


0.35 3 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.61 


- 


5, . 








0.15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.42 


0.01 


2 


0.20 


- 


- 


- 


6, . 








0.92 


- 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


0.20 


0.63 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7, • 








- 


- 


0.01' 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.53 


8, . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


9, . 








- 


2 


2 


0.13 


0.02 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10, . 








0.03 


1.383 


0.65 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


11, . 








- 


0.011 


- 


- 


0.42 


0.42 


- 


- 


0.87 


- 


- 


- 


12, . 








0.413 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


13, . . 








- 


0.03 


2 


2 


- 


0.35 


- 


0.04 


- 


- 


- 





14, . . 








2 


2 


0.031 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.28 


- 


1.353 


15, . 








0.393 


5 


- 


1.95 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.05 


- 


- 


16, . . 








2 


1.353 


2 


- 


0.38 


- 


0.30 


0.13 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


17, • 








1.083 


- 


0.073 


- 


2 


2 


- 


2 


0.10 


- 


0.09 


- 


18, . . 

1Q 








- 


2 


2 


2 


0.05 


0.52 


0.36 


1.76 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


jy, . 

20, . . 








- 


1.10 


0.171 


0.08 


- 


- 


- 


0.07 




" 


- 


_ 


21, . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.36 


- 


- 


22, . . 








- 


- 


- 


0.38 


2 


2 


0.02 


- 


2 


- 


0.03 


- 


23, . . 








2 


2 


- 


0.49 


0.53 


0.07 


2 


- 


2 


2 


2 


- 


24, . . 








o 


1.88 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.60 


- 


1.63 


0.28 


2 


- 


25, . . 








0.593 


- 


2.03 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


26, . . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2.273 


2.061 


27, . . 








- 


2 


2 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.03 


- 


- 


28, . . 








- 


0.022 


0.52 


0.73 


0.29 


0.11 


- 


- 


1.52 


- 


- 


- 


29, . . 








2 


- 


- 


2 


0.22 


- 


- 


0.19 


- 


- 


0.22 


- 


30, . 








0.571 


- 


- 


0.513 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31, . . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


Total 




4.14 


5.77 


4.07 


4.53 


2.31 


2.89 


1.63 


2.82 


4.55 


1.09 


3.24 


3.94 



Total for the year 40.98 inches, 
i Snow. 2 Rainfall included in that of the following day. 3 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



201 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1909. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. Amount. 


Duration. 


Jan. 3, . 
Jan. 4, . 
Jan. 5, . 
Jan. 6, . 
Jan. 11, . 
Jan. 12, . 
Jan. 13, • 
Jan. 14, . 
Jan. 14, . 
Jan. 15, . 
Jan. 16, . 
Jan. 17, . 
Jan. 24, . 
Jan. 25, . 
Jan. 28, . 
Jan. 29, . 


j .09 

1.00 

|,7 

J .06 1 

.46 2 

.912 

1.00 
.09 1 
J .911 


6.30 P.M. to 

6.30 A.M. 
8.30 A.M. to 

7.15 A.M. 

6.50 A.M. to 

4.15 P.M. 
10.50 P.M. to 

12.30 P.M. 
1.00 P.M. to 

1.30 A.M. 
7.15 P.M. to 

6.00 P.M. 
7.10 A.M. to 

6.00 A.M. 
5.25 A.M. to 10.00 A.M. 
10.00 P.M. to 

11.00 P.M. 


May 1, . 
May 4, . 
May 5, . 
May 7, . 
May 11, . 
May 16, . 
May 16, . 
May 18, . 
May 21, . 
May 23, . 
May 27, . 
May 28, . 
May 29, . 

Total, 


.40 ■ 

.18 

.04 

.18 

.09 

.34 

J. 13 
|. N 

j .36 
.09 

2.44 


7-00 A.M. to 10.30 P.M. 

2.15 A.M. to 6.45 A.M. 

12.30 A.M. to 3.30 A.M. 

12.55 A.M. to 3.25 A.M. 

12 . 55 A.M. to 5 . 25 A.M. 

3.45 A.M. to 9.30 A.M. 

5.10 P.M. to 

7.30 A.M. 
11.30 P.M. to 

10.30 A.M. 
4.00 P.M. to 

5.25 A.M. 
2.40 P.M. to 6.30 P.M. 


Jan. 30, . 


June 5, . 
June 6, . 
June 10, . 
June 11, . 
June 13, . 
June 14, . 
June 17, . 
June 18, . 
June 23, . 

Total, 


J 2. OS 

.52 
.05 

[ .89 

j .53 
.05 

4.12 


3.40 A.M. to 

4.40 A.M. 
5.55 A.M. to 11.45 P.M. 


Total, 


4.79 


Feb. 9, . 
Feb. 10, . 
Feb. 14, . 
Feb. 15, . 
Feb. 15, . 
Feb. 16, . 
Feb. 19, . 
Feb. 20, . 


J 1.47 2 

.54 
J .80 
|.91 
jl.81 
j .081 


10.00 P.M. to 

7.00 P.M. 
8.00 P.M. to 

6.20 A.M. 
8.00 A.M. to 

11.00 P.M. 
2.30 P.M. to 

10.00 A.M. 
8.00 P.M. to 

2.10 A.M. 
11.05 P.M. to 

10.00 A.M. 


10.05 A.M. to 2.25 P.M. 
6.40 P.M. to 

1.45 A.M. 
11.30 P.M. to 

7.00 A.M. 
12.25 A.M. to 4.30 A.M. 


Feb. 23, . 
Feb. 25, . 
Feb. 27, . 
Feb. 28, . 


July 1, . 
July 3, . 
July 6, . 
July 16, . 
July 18, . 
July 19, . 
July 23, . 
July 24, . 

Total, 


.02 
.21 
.05 
.29 
.37 
.06 

}•» 

1.10 


8.00 P.M. to 8.15 P.M. 
2.20 A.M. to 7.30 A.M. 
1.00 A.M. to 9.00 P.M. 
4.00 P.M. to 10.00 P.M. 
7.00 P.M. to 9.00 P.M. 
11.15 A.M. to 11.50 A.M. 
1.35 P.M. to 

2.05 A.M. 


Total, 


5.61 


Mar. 1, . 
Mar. 2, . 
Mar. 3, . 
Mar. 4, . . 
Mar. 9, . 


J. r,- 

J .45 2 

J .76 

.04 
.09 2 

I .231 

1.90 
.53 

4.27 


11.50 P.M. to 

2.00 P.M. 
6.00 P.M. to 

10.00 A.M. 
12.30 P.M. to 

5.50 A.M. 
8.30 A.M. to 1.30 P.M. 
12.40 A.M. to 6.10 A.M. 
8.00 P.M. to 

6.25 A.M. 
7.00 A.M. to 10.40 P.M. 
2.35 A.M. to 2.30 P.M. 


Mar. 10, . 
Mar. 10, . 
Mar. 17, . 
Mar. 19, . 
Mar. 20, . 
Mar. 25, . 
Mar. 28, . 

Total, 


Aug. 4, . 
Aug. 6, . 
Aug. 16, . 
Aug. 17, . 
Aug. 18, . 
Aug. 20, . 
Aug. 29, . 

Total, 


} .95 
.03 

j 2.72 

.05 
.36 

4.11 


11.15 P.M. to 

7.30 A.M. 
4.25 A.M. to 5.25 A.M. 
7.30 A.M. to 

6.00 A.M. 
7.35 P.M. to 8.50 P.M. 
3.10 P.M. to 4.00 P.M. 


Apr. 2, . 


j .32 

.18 

j 1.60 

j .06 

|,1 

.53 

j .86 

j .67 
4.53 


11.00 A.M. to 

8.30 P.M. 
6.35 A.M. to 3.00 P.M. 
3.15 A.M. to 

3.30 P.M. 
5.00 P.M. to 

5.50 A.M. 
7.00 P.M. to 

7.30 A.M. 
11.15 A.M. to 4.45 P.M. 
| 11.15 P.M. to 

9.30 A.M. 
2.25 A.M. to 

7.00 A.M. 




Apr. 3, . 
Apr. 9, . 
Apr. 14, . 
Apr. 15, . 
Apr. 19, . 
Apr. 20, . 
Apr. 21, . 
Apr. 22, . 
Apr. 23, . 
Apr. 27, . 
Apr. 28, . 
Apr. 30, . 
May 1, . 


Sept. 1, . 
Sept. 5, . 
Sept. 10, . 
Sept. 11, . 
Sept. 17, . 
Sept. 17, . 
Sept. 23, . 
Sept. 24, . 
Sept. 24, . 
Sept. 25, . 
Sept. 26, . 
Sept. 28, . 

Total, 


.46 
.21 

J 1.08 

.02 
.23 

|.« 

| .78 
J 2.10 


2.10 P.M. to 5.15 P.M. 
6.50 A.M. to 12.30 P.M. 
1.45 P.M. to 

7.30 A.M. 
5.10 A.M. to 5.20 A.M. 
7.20 A.M. to 1.15 P.M. 
6.30 A.M. to 

2.35 A.M. 
10.10 A.M. to 

2.45 A.M. 
7.55 A.M. to 

10.15 P.M. 


Total, 


5.79 





i Snow. 



2 Rain and snow, 



202 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No 4. — ■ Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1909 — 

Concluded. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount 


Duration. 


Oct. 12, 
Oct. 15, 
Oct. 15, 
Oct. 18, 
Oct. 21, 
Oct. 22, 
Oct. 23, 
Oct. 25, 
Oct. 28, 




.17 
.21 
.10 
.04 

J .53 

.50 
.03 


7.05 A.M. to 12.30 P.M. 
12.25 a.m. to 3.45 A.M. 
7.55 A.M. to 1.00 P.M. 
5.00 P.M. to 8.15 P.M. 
6.00 P.M. to 

2.40 A.M. 
9.00 P.M. to 

3.35 A.M. 
12.05 A.M. to 2.25 A.M. 


Dec. 7, . 
Dec. 8, . 
Dec. 13, . 
Dec. 14, . 
Dec. 25, . 
Dec. 26, . 

Total, 


j.»7 

j 1.55 2 
J2.27 1 


4.30 P.M. to 

1.45 A.M. 
8.15 A.M. to 

6.00 A.M. 
6.00 P.M. to 

9.00 P.M. 


4.39 








Total, 


1.58 




Nov. 2, . 
Nov. 4, . 
Nov. 8, . 
Nov. 16, . 
Nov. 17, . 
Nov. 22, . 
Nov. 23, . 
Nov. 23, . 
Nov. 24, . 
Nov. 26, . 
Nov. 29, . 

Total, 


} .69 
.05 

1 * U 
.05 
.25 2 

j 3.44 
.27 

4.89 


2.25 P.M. to 

5.45 A.M. 
2.30 P.M. to 8.00 P.M. 
6.30 P.M. to 

3.45 P.M. 
11.15 A.M. tO 

7.00 A.M. 
1.00 P.M. to 10.00 P.M. 
2.10 A.M. tO 

10.15 A.M. 
5.20 A.M. tO 10.00 A.M. 









Total for the year 47.62 inches. 
1 Snow. 2 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 213 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 
drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into Sudbury Reservoir. 
7 : 00 a.m. Jan. 1 to 3 : 50 P.M. Feb. 10. 
11:10 a.m. Feb. 19 " 12:00 M. Feb. 20. 
5:20 p.m. Mar. 8 " 9:50 a.m. Apr. 15. 
7:00 p.m. Apr. 18 " 10:50 a.m. Apr. 30. 
7:00 p.m. May 3 « 10:00 a.m. Aug. 18. 
5:00 P.M. Aug. 19 " 10:00 p.m. Sept. 12. 
5:00 p.m. Sept. 18 " 9:00 p.m. Sept. 18. 
7:00 p.m. Oct. 2 " 7:00 a.m. Oct. 3. 
5:00 p.m. Oct. 9 " 7:00 a.m. Jan. 1, 1910. 
Total quantity, 36,255,900,000 gallons. 

From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to the Weston Reservoir. 
7:00 a.m. Jan. 1 to 7:00 a.m. Jan. 11. 
4:30 P.M. Jan. 12 " 6:00 a.m. Jan. 14. 
5:00 p.m. Jan. 15 " 11:00 p.m. Jan. 17. 
5:00 p.m. Jan. 20 " 7:00 a.m. Jan. 1, 1910. 
Total quantity, 10,745,600,000 gallons. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 2 through Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

7 : 00 a.m. Jan. 7 to 11 : 00 a.m. Feb. 12. 

Total quantity, 900,600,000 gallons. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

7:00 A.M. Jan. 1 to 7 : 00 A.M. Jan. 1, 1910. 
Total quantity, 29,581,800,000 gallons. 

From Lake Cochituate through Cochituate Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



1 


:00 P.M. 


Jan. 


26 


to 5 


: 15 P.M. 


Feb. 


2 


7: 


: 00 A.M. 


Apr. 


2 


" 12: 


: 00 M. 


Apr. 


5 


8: 


00 A.M. 


June 


6 


" 8: 


00 A.M. 


June 


23 


9: 


30 A.M. 


June 


23 


" 9: 


00 A.M. 


July 


9 


10: 


: 00 A.M. 


July 


9 


" 1: 


00 P.M. 


Sept. 


29 



Total quantity, 2,472,600,000 gallons. 



214 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 14. 



Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 
1909 by Months. 1 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 
into Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 
Aqueduct 
into Metro- 
politan District 
(Gallons). 


Sudbury 

Aqueduct into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons) . 


Cochituate 

Aqueduct into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons) . 


January, 








119,010,000 


30,539,000 


94,397,000 


3,581,000 


February, 








39,175,000 


29,557,000 


94,025,000 


1,096,000 


March, . 








94,435,000 


29,971,000 


90,174,000 


- 


April, . 








84,677,000 


29,690,000 


88,687,000 


2,123,000 


May, 








98,461,000 


29,326,000 


91,419,000 


- 


June, 








102,233,000 


28,747,000 


75,370,000 


17,200,000 


July, 








111,742,000 


28,977,000 


76,197,000 


21,119,000 


August, 








104,423,000 


27,687,000 


73,335,000 


20,487,000 


September, . 








51,133,000 


29,757,000 


71,820,000 


15,380,000 


October, 








93,561,000 


29,790,000 


86,626,000 


- 


November, 








182,790,000 


29,487,000 


78,673,000 


- 


December, 








105,042,000 


29,761,000 


81,826,000 


- 


Average, 




99,312,000 


29,440,000 


83,513,000 


6,774,000 



i Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



219 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



221 



Table No. 21. — (Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water during 
the Year 1909, in the Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water 
Works, including Boston, Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Everett, Quincy, 
Medford, Melrose, Revere, Watertown, Arlington, Lexington, Milton, Stone- 
ham, Winthrop, Swampscott, Belmont and Nahant. (For Consumption of 
Water in Whole Metropolitan Water District, see Table No. 24-) 



Month. 



Average 

Daily 

Consumption 

(Gallons). 



Estimated 
Population. 



Consumption 

per 

Inhabitant 

(Gallons). 



January, 
February, . 
March, . 
April, . 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, . 
October, 
November, . 
December, . 

For the year, 



129,656,200 
126,695,900 
122,297,500 
121,656,900 
120,308,100 
121,475,500 
122,695,700 
119,222,300 
113,840,000 
111,327,400 
108,025,900 
112,318,600 



953,020 
954,760 
956,500 
958,260 
961,380 
966,510 
969,360 
970,890 
970,920 
970,910 
971,510 
973,460 



136 
133 
128 
127 
125 
126 
127 
123 
117 
115 
111 
115 



119,119,100 



965,490 



123 



In addition to the above quantities, the United States Government Keservation on Peddocks 
Island was supplied with 34,632,200 gallons, equivalent to a daily average rate of 94,900 gallons, 
and a part of Saugus with 5,956,000 gallons, equivalent to a daily average rate of 16,300 gallons. 



Table No. 22. — (Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water in 
Gallons, from the Low-service System in 1909. 

















Southern 
Low Service. 


Northern 
Low Service. 




Month. 


Boston, 

excluding 

East Boston 

and 
Charlestown. 


Portions of Charles- 
town, Somerville, 
Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford, 
East Boston and 
Arlington. 


Total 

Low-service 

Consumption. 


January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

December, 














54,481,900 
52,558,900 
50,468,400 
49,810,700 
49,134,800 
48,529,800 
47,939,100 
46,857,900 
45,039,600 
44,550,600 
43,998,000 
46,838,300 


30,010,800 
29,427,500 
26,835,900 
26,037,300 
25,599,600 
26,383,600 
27,010,800 
26,615,400 
25,389,800 
25,022,400 
24,579,700 
25,447,800 


84,492,700 
81,986,400 
77,304,300 
75,848,000 
74,734,400 
74,913,400 
74,949,900 
73,473,300 
70,429,400 
69,573,000 
68,577,700 
72,286,100 


For the yea 


r, 












48,335,600 


26,531,500 


74,867,100 



222 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 23. — (Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water, in 
Gallons, from the High-service and Extra High-service Systems in 1909. 











Southern 
High Service. 


Southern 

Extra High 

Service. 


Northern 
High Service. 


Northern 

Extra High 

Service. 


Month. 


Quincy, Water- 
town, Belmont, 
and Portions 
of Boston and 
Milton. 


Portions of 

Boston 
and Milton. 


Revere, Winthrop, 
Swampscott, Nahant, 
Stoneham, Melrose, 
and Portions of Bos- 
ton, Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford 
and Somerville. 


Lexington 

and 

Portion 

of Arlington. 


January, 








37,191,200 


509,600 


6,944,200 


518,400 


February, 








36,725,100 


468,100 


6,990,100 


526,200 


March, . 








37,081,300 


524,300 


6,786,600 


601,000 


April, 








37,647,000 


579,300 


6,968,500 


614,100 


May, 








36,822,400 


583,800 


7,523,400 


644,100 


June, 








36,555,600 


644,300 


8,612,200 


750,000 


July, 








36,916,300 


777,200 


9,153,000 


899,300 


August, . 








35,839,700 


659,700 


8,450,900 


798,700 


September, 








34,752,800 


534,500 


7,437,300 


686,000 


October, 








33,794,100 


511,100 


6,806,000 


643,200 


November, 








31,888,500 


532,300 


6,425,500 


601,900 


December, 








'32,357,200 


531,400 


6,566,200 


577,700 


For the ye 


ar, 


35,629,4001 


572,500 


7,393,8002 


656,300 



In addition to the above i the United States Government Reservation on Peddocks Island was 
supplied with a daily average rate of 94,900 gallons, and - part of Saugus with a daily average 
rate of 16,300 gallons. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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226 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 25. — (Pump Basis.) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan 
Water District, as constituted in the Year 1909, and a Small Section of the 
Town of Saugus,from 1S93 to 1909. 

[Gallons per day.] 





Month. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1S9S. 


January, 






75,209,000 


67,506,000 


68,925,000 


82,946,000 


85,366,000 


83,880,000 


February, . 






71,900,000 


68,944,000 


80,375,000 


87,021,000 


83,967,000 


87,475,000 


March, 






67.63^,000 


62,710,000 


69,543,000 


86,111,000 


82,751,000 


85,468,000 


April, . 






62,309,000 


57,715,000 


62,909,000 


77,529,000 


79,914,000 


76,574,000 


May, . 






61,025,000 


60,676,000 


65,194,000 


73,402,000 


76,772,000 


76,677,000 


Jnne, . 






63,374,000 


68,329,000 


69.905,000 


77.639,000 


77,952,000 


83,463,000 


July, . 






69,343,000 


73,642,000 


69,667,000 


S0,000,000 


85,525,000 


88,228,000 


August, 






66,983,000 


67,995,000 


72,233,000 


78,537,000 


84,103,000 


87,55S,000 


September, 






64,654,000 


67,137,000 


73,724,000 


74,160,000 


84,296,000 


88,296,000 


October, 






63,770,000 


62,735,000 


67,028,000 


71,762,000 


79,551,000 


81,770,000 


November, . 






61,204,000 


62,231,000 


64,881,000 


71,933,000 


72.762.000 


78,177,000 


December, . 






66,700,000 


65,108,000 


70,443,000 


79,449,000 


76,594,000 


86,355,000 


Average, 


66,165,000 


65,382,000 


69,499,000 


78,360,000 


80,793,000 


83,651,000 


Population, 






723,153 


743,354 


763,557 


7S6,3S5 


809,213 


832,042 


Per capita, . 






91.5 


88.0 


91.0 


99.7 


99.8 


100.5 





Month. 1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


January, . 




96,442,000 


100,055,000 


111,275,000 


118,435,000 


125,176,000 


137,771,000 


February, 




103,454,000 


98,945,000 


117,497,000 


117,268,000 


122,728,000 


143,222,000 


March, 




90,200,000 


97,753,000 


105.509,000 


108,461,000 


111,977,000 


123,334,000 


April, 




86,491,000 


89,497,000 


93,317,000 


103,153,000 


107,179,000 


108,688,000 


May, . 




89,44S,000 


87,780,000 


95,567,000 


106,692,000 


111,589,000 


111,715,000 


June, . 




97,691,000 


98,581,000 


103,420,000 


110,002,000 


105,590,000 


111,209,000 


July, . 




96,821,000 


107,786,000 


106,905,000 


108,340,000 


107,562,000 


113,584,000 


August, 




92,072,000 


102,717,000 


102,815,000 


107,045,000 


103,570,000 


112,836,000 


September, 




91,478,000 


103,612,000 


102,103,000 


107,752,000 


106,772,000 


114,188,000 


October, . 




S9,580,000 


98,358,000 


103,389,(100 


106,560,000 


103,602,000 


108,290,000 


November, 




86,719,000 


93,648,000 


101,324,000 


105,175,000 


103,477,000 


108.0.54,000 


December, 




85,840,000 


97,844,000 


113,268,000 


125,434,000 


U4,72H)00 


125,119,000 


Average, 


92,111,000 


98,059,000 


104,645,000 


110,345,000 


110,277.000 


118,114,000 


Population, 




854,870 


877.69S 


892,740 


907,780 


922,820 


937,860 


Per capita, 




107.8 


in.: 


117.2 


121.6 


119.5 


125.9 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



227 






Table No. 25. 



(Pump Basis.) Consumption of Water, etc. — Concluded. 

[Gallons per day.] 



Month. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


January, . 


130,878,000 


126,093,000 


137,730,000 


132,376,000 


133,275,000 


February, 








140,595,000 


130,766,000 


150,822,000 


146,199,000 


130,763,000 


March, 








120,879,000 


123,570,000 


134,202,000 


128,884,000 


126,842,000 


April, 








111,898,000 


118,428,000 


121,556,000 


128,926,000 


125,335,000 


May, 








115,804,000 


122,404,000 


123,502,000 


131,040,000 


123,305,000 


June, 








117,441,000 


121,882,000 


125,623,000 


139,843,000 


125,179,000 


July, 








124,769,000 


118,726,000 


128,779,000 


138,232,000 


126,765,000 


August, . 








121,158,000 


120,591,000 


131,098,000 


128,073,000 


121,781,000 


September, 








120,103,000 


121,685,000 


124,751,000 


129,972,000 


118,043,000 


October, . 








118,301,000 


116,561,000 


124,051,000 


124,189,000 


115,939,000 


November, 








116,693,000 


113,746,000 


119,627,000 


117,119,000 


111,664,000 


December, 








122,696,000 


130,995,000 


122,407,000 


124,468,000 


115,733,000 


Average, 


121,671,000 


122,085,000 


128,561,000 


130,712,000 


122,851,000 


Population, 








953,556 


965,990 


9S6,680 


995,010 


1,022,540 


Per capita, 








127.6 


126.4 


130.3 


131.4 


120.1 



This table includes the water consumed in the cities and towns enumerated in Table No. 21, 
together with the water consumed in Newton and Hyde Park, which are included in the Metro- 
politan Water District, but have not been supplied from the Metropolitan Works. The populations 
for the years 1901 to 1904 were revised after the census of 1905 became available, and consequently 
the figures in the reports after 1904 differ from those published in a corresponding table in the 
preceding annual reports. 



228 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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234 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 32. 



Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 
from 1892 to 1909. 
[Parts per 100,000.] 



Year. 



1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 



1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 



Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation 


eg 


.si 

cSCC 
5 


Is 

o 
H 


C3 
_o 

op 

o 

Hi 


.37 


37 


4.70 


1.67 


.61 


53 


4.54 


1.84 


.69 


58 


4.64 


1.83 


.72 


59 


4.90 


2.02 


.49 


45 


4.29 


1.67 


.65 


55 


4.82 


1.S4 


.41 


40 


4.19 


1.60 


.23 


28 


3.70 


1.30 


.24 


29 


3.80 


1.20 


.24 


29 


4.43 


1.64 


.26 


30 


3.93 


1.56 


.25 


29 


3.98 


1.50 


- 


23 


3.93 


1.59 


- 


24 


3.86 


1.59 


- 


24 


3.86 


1.39 


- 


22 


3.83 


1.40 


- 


19. 


3.50 


1.35 


- 


18 


3.46 


1.43 



Ammonia. 





ALBUMINOID. 




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.0007 
.0010 
.0006 
.0006 
.0005 
.0009 
.0008 
.0006 
.0012 
.0013 
.0016 
.0013 
.0023 
.0020 
.0018 
.0013 
.0011 
.0011 



.0168 


.013S 


.0174 


.0147 


.0169 


.0150 


.0197 


.0175 


.0165 


.0142 


.0193 


.0177 


.0152 


.0136 


.0136 


.0122 


.0157 


.0139 


.0158 


.0142 


.0139 


.0119 


.0125 


.0110 


.0139 


.0121 


.0145 


.0124 


.0159 


.0134 


.0129 


.0109 


.0115 


.0092 


.0128 


.0103 



.0030 
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.0023 
.0016 
.0016 
.0014 
.0018 
.0016 
.0020 
.0015 
.001S 
.0021 
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.0020 
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Nitrogen as 


6 
o 

5 


02 

s- 


05 

G> 

43 

2 


.41 


.0210 


.0001 


.38 


.0143 


.0001 


.41 


.0106 


.0001 


.40 


.0171 


.0001 


.37 


.0155 


.0001 


.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.29 


.0097 


.0001 


.24 


.0137 


.0001 


.25 


.0076 


.0001 


.30 


.0173 


.0001 


.29 


.0092 


.0000 


.30 


.0142 


.0001 


.34 


.0110 


.0001 


.35 


.0083 


.0001 


.34 


.0054 


.0001 


.33 


.0068 


.0001 


.33 


.0092 


.0001 


.28 


.0034 


.0000 



.60 
.63 
.69 
.56 
.64 
.44 
.35 



1.9 
l.S 
1.7 
0.7 
1.4 
1.6 
1.4 
1.1 



38 J 1.3 



.42 

.40 
.39 
.37 
.35 
.36 
.32 
.26 



1.7 
1.3 
1.5 
1.5 
1.4 
1.3 
1.3 
1.2 
1.3 



Note relating to Chemical Examinations of Water, Tables Nos. 26-82. 
The chemical examinations contained in the tables were made by the 
State Board of Health. Previous to the year 1904 colors were deter- 
mined by the Nessler standard, but the corresponding values by the 
platinum standard are also given, for the purpose of comparison with 
colors determined in the laboratory of the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board, as given in subsequent tables. The odor recorded is 
taken in such a way that it is a much stronger odor than would be 
noticed in samples drawn directly from a tap or collected directly from 
a reservoir. The important samples are collected and examined semi- 
monthly or monthly. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



237 



Table No. 34. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various 

Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1909, inclusive. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 









Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Year. 


Sudbury Aque- 
duct Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 

Gate -house 

No. 2. 


Low Service, 

244 Boylston 

Street. 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898, 






207 


145 


Ill 


96 


- 


1899, 






224 


104 


217 


117 


123 


1900, 






248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901, 






225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902, 






203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903, 






76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904, 






347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905, 






495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906, 






231 


145 


246 


154 


261 


1907, 






147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908, 






162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909, 






198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


Mean 


> 


230 


177 


192 


153 


231 



238 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 35. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1909. {Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[Platinum Standard.] 

























Framingham 












Wachusett Reservoir. 


Sudbury 
Reservoir. 


Reservoir. 


Lake Cochiti 


JATE. 




No. 2. 


No. 3. 




Month. 


6 


0> 


a 


fcO 

CO ^j 


o 

a, 


u 
_> 

CD 
43 
03 


<£ 


+3 


n 


a 

V 
Oh 

<w a 
o a 


43 




6 


43 

® 




DO 

a 

03 

a 02 




03 


T3 


o 


W o> 




& 


03 


t3 


o 




-d 


'O 




-d 


o 


® 




S-i 

m 




o 
tt 




"B 


+5 
Xfl 


<4H 
f- 

w. 


t3 

i 


43 

o 


is 




Ti 
S 


S-l 

a 

CO 




43 
43 

o 
M 


ta 
a 

h- 1 


January, . 


14 


15 


15 


22 


47 


36 


16 


16 


16 


18 


61 


16 


28 


27 


27 


59 


February, . 


16 


16 


17 


46 


49 


45 


17 


17 


18 


49 


68 


20 


26 


28 


28 


71 


March, 


18 


18 


18 


46 


46 


42 


25 


23 


24 


43 


72 


25 


29 


31 


33 


80 


April, . 


20 


20 


20 


59 


60 


55 


29 


29 


30 


29 


93 


30 


31 


32 


34 


103 


May, . 


24 


24 


24 


61 


72 


65 


31 


31 


31 


70 


109 


33 


34 


35 


36 


124 


June, . 


24 


24 


25 


49 


68 


62 


30 


30 


31 


30 


113 


31 


31 


32 


82 


105 


July, . 


21 


21 


22 


31 


45 


42 


22 


22 


24 


22 


91 


22 


27 


29 


70 


65 


August, 


20 


21 


23 


25 


43 


32 


20 


20 


27 


22 


88 


21 


26 


34 


211 


48 


September, 


19 


20 


23 


24 


42 


28 


20 


20 


31 


24 


75 


19 


26 


33 


235 


46 


October, 


15 


15 


18 


18 


49 


31 


17 


17 


18 


18 


60 


17 


24 


30 


271 


39 


November, . 


13 


13 


13 


14 


44 


28 


14 


14 


14 


14 


51 


14 


28 


28 


60 


78 


December, . 


14 


14 


14 


35 


52 


44 
43 


14 


14 


14 


14 


55 


14 
22 


26 


26 


29 


92 


Mean, . 


18 


18 


19 


36 


51 


21 


21 


23 


29 


78 


28 


30 


93 


76 



i The colors given in this column represent the combined colors of the waters of the four prin- 
cipal feeders. The color of each is determined monthly, and due weight is given, in combining 
the results, to the sizes of the streams. 



Table No. 35. — Concluded. 

[Platinum Standard.] 





Chestnut Hill 


Spot 


Fells 


Northern 


Southern 




Rrservoir. 


Pond. 


Reservoir. 


Service. 


Service. 


Month. 


43 

a <d 
& H< 
a<1 

to 

43 


43 

03 

a 

43 

A A. 

O 43 
O O 

— 'O 

43 C7< 


6 

.to 

43 <D 

o3 S 

a 

m 


a 

43 

a 
o> 
■a 

2 


as 

to 

a 

o 
A 

i 

43 

o3 

43^ 

a 

CD 

a 


ap at Glenwood 
Yard, Medford 
(Low Service). 


ap at Fire Station, 
Hancock Street, 
Everett (High 
Service). 


ap at 244 Boylston 
Street, Boston 
(Low Service). 


ap at 1 Asliburton 
Place, Boston 
(High Service). 




1— 1 


1— 1 


m 


S 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


January, 


25 




22 


14 


14 


22 


14 


18 


22 


February, 






23 


27 


23 


16 


16 


23 


16 


21 


23 


March, 






24 


- 


24 


17 


17 


23 


17 


22 


23 


April, . 






31 


33 


30 


18 


18 


30 


18 


30 


30 


May, . 






31 


- 


30 


19 


19 


30 


19 


30 


30 


June, . 






32 


31 


31 


18 


IS 


31 


18 


30 


32 


July, . 






23 


28 


22 


16 


16 


22 


16 


22 


23 


August, 






20 


26 


21 


15 


15 


21 


15 


21 


21 


September, 






20 


26 


21 


16 


16 


21 


16 


21 


21 


October, 






17 


- 


18 


14 


14 


18 


14 


18 


IS 


November, 






14 


- 


14 


12 


12 


14 


12 


14 


14 


December, 






14 


- 


14 


11 
16 


11 


14 


12 


14 


14 


Mean, 






23 


29 


23 


16 


22 


16 


22 


23 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



239 



Table No. 36. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1909. {Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[The temperatures are taken at the same places and times as the samples for microscopical exami- 
nation; the depth given for each reservoir is the depth from high water mark.] 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 











Sudbury Reservoir 


Framing-ham Reser- 


Lake 


Cochituate 




Wachtjsett 


(Depth at 


Place op 


voir No. 3 (Depth 


(Depth at Place 




Reservoir. 




Observation 




at Place of Obser- 


of Observation 












54.5 Feet). 




vation 20.5 Feet). 


62 


.0 Feet). 


Month. 














b 
o> . 
















» 

o 
cS 

q-< 
u 
B 

02 


A 
P* 

03 

3 


a 

o 


6 
o 
oS 

3 

02 


A 

a, 

03 


a 

o 

O 

pq 


Og 

O cS 


<s 

o 

u 

B 

02 


A 
ft 

93 


a* 

o 

-p 
o 
pq 


93 
o 

f* 

B 

02 


A 
-p 

ft 

93 


a" 

o 

o 
pq 


January, 


33.5 


33.7 


34.7 


34.1 


36.9 


38.1 


33.8 


34.8 


34.2 


35.3 


36.5 


35.0 


. 


February, . 


33.8 


34.8 


35.3 


34.6 


36.3 


37.5 


33.6 


35.8 


36.4 


36.8 


35.7 


36.5 


36.6 


March, 


35.5 


36.0 


36.5 


36.9 


37.5 


38.0 


35.3 


38.0 


37.5 


38.4 


37.7 


38.0 


38.0 


April, . 


42.0 


42.3 


42.0 


46.0 


45.5 


44.6 


43.1 


47.9 


48.5 


47.5 


46.0 


45.5 


43.6 


May, . 


51.5 


50.3 


49.5 


55.7 


54.1 


52.3 


51.8 


62.0 


61.3 


61.0 


53.8 


49.7 


44.2 


June, . 


63.6 


52.8 


51.6 


67.9 


64.7 


60.9 


56.8 


70.4 


70.1 


68.8 


65.1 


54.8 


50.5 


July, . 


69.8 


56.0 


53.8 


72.1 


69.3 


65.0 


58.0 


73.9 


73.6 


73.0 


73.1 


55.4 


50.8 


August, 


71.6 


61.0 


54.0 


72.2 


68.9 


65.4 


58.1 


72.4 


72.1 


71.9 


71.0 


53.9 


48.9 


September, . 


66.0 


63.3 


54.0 


65.8 


65.0 


64.0 


60.8 


66.0 


65.7 


65.5 


64.5 


54.8 


48.0 


October, 


58.8 


58.5 


54.5 


57.8 


57.5 


57 • 5 


54.4 


56.4 


56.2 


55.9 


57.3 


53.9 


48.6 


November, . 


48.8 


49.0 


49.0 


47.9 


48.2 


48.2 


47.9 


44.7 


44.8 


44.7 


46.6 


46.1 


45.8 


December, . 


37.8 


38.3 


38.3 


35.8 


36.0 


36.8 


37.0 


34.8 


34.7 


34.4 


35.9 


36.5 


36.5 


Mean, . 


51.1 


48.0 


46.1 


52.2 


51.7 


50.7 


47.6 


53.1 


52.9 


52.8 


51.9 


46.7 


44.6 



Table No. 36. — Concluded. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 









Chestnut 

Hill 
Reservoir. 


Spot Pond (Depth at 

Place of Observation 

28.0 Feet). 


Northern 
Service. 


Southern 
Service. 




c<i 








§3 , 


2 03 *> 


B B 

So ■ 


B a 
2o^ 


Month. 


93 

-p 03 
eS 2 




+3 




Glenw 

, Medf 
Service) 


-P U "* 

02 •— - 

.a «-g1T 


apat244Boyls 
Street, Bost 
(Low Service) 


Ashbur 

Bost 

Service 




03 

B 
& 


03 
O 

e3 

u 

B 


03 


a 

o 

-p 

o 


ap at 
Yard 
(Low 


apatF 
Hancc 
Evere 
Servic 


ap at 1 
Place, 
(High 




H 


02 


S 


pq 


H 


H 


H 


H 


January, 


36.6 


37.6 


38.1 


38.5 


42.5 


45.0 


40.5 


42.5 


February, 






37.7 


38.1 


38.9 


39.3 


39.6 


40.8 


40.4 


41.1 


March, . 






39-4 


38.5 


38.5 


38.8 


40.8 


40.8 


42.3 


41.6 


April, . 






49.2 


46.1 


46.1 


46.1 


48.0 


49.3 


50.6 


49.7 


May, . 






56.1 


54.3 


54.1 


53.4 


54.8 


55.3 


59.7 


57.8 


June, . 






67.3 


66.8 


65.5 


63.3 


64.4 


65.1 


66.5 


67.7 


July, . 






72.5 


72.4 


71.9 


69.9 


70.9 


71.0 


73.4 


72.5 


August, 






72.8 


73.1 


73.1 


71.8 


71.4 


71.9 


72.4 


72.8 


September, 






66.3 


66.8 


66.6 


66.6 


67.0 


66.1 


67.7 


66.9 


October, 






58.8 


57.9 


59.4 


59.3 


60.8 


59.8 


60.5 


60.4 


November, 






46.2 


46.1 


46.4 


46.5 


51.7 


50.2 


52.2 


49.7 


December, 






37.3 


35.4 


35.8 


35.8 


41.4 


39.6 


42.1 


43.1 


Mean, 




• 


53.4 


52.8 


52.9 


52.4 


54.4 


54.6 


55.7 


55.5 



240 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 37. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1909. 
[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 









Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


a 

3 


S 

a 


P 

c3 


a 

3 

03 


3 


a 


1 
| 


'I 




January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

December, 






59.0 
58.0 
54.0 
85.0 
82.0 
95.0 
98.0 
9S.0 
83.0 
83.0 
74.0 
52.0 


—2.0 
0.0 
15.0 
22.0 
33.0 
41.0 
47.0 
41.0 
40.0 
25.0 
22.0 
1.0 


29.4 
31.6 
35.2 
48.6 
56.2 
69.4 
70.9 
71.0 
62.7 
52.6 
45.3 
28.4 


57.0 
57.0 
53.0 
82.0 
83.0 
93.0 
95.0 
94.0 
81.0 
81.0 
75.0 
52.0 


—7.0 
—4.0 
14.0 
22.0 
32.0 
39.0 
47.0 
40.0 
38.0 
25.0 
18.0 
—5.0 


29.2 
31.5 
34.9 
47.8 
56.8 
68.0 
70.1 
67.9 
61.8 
50.6 
44.2 
27.5 


56.0 
53.0 
53.0 
81.0 
82.0 
90.0 
90.0 
90.0 
7S.0 
79.0 
75.0 
55.0 


—8.0 
0.0 
13.0 
20.0 
35.0 
43.0 
46.0 
35.0 
37.0 
24.0 
17.0 

—4.0 


25.7 
27.4 
32.1 
45.3 
55.6 
67.4 
68.4 
65.7 
60.7 
48.5 
42.3 
26.9 


Average, 


- 


- 


50.1 


- 


- 


49.2 


- 


- 


47.2 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



241 



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p 


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OQ 


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co 

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a 


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l> 


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p 


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Ph 




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R 


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IO 


P 


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^1 



242 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



S3 



"S3 
S3 



s 




cs 




"+-^ 




'<>> 




> — i 




o 




ft. 




o 




*~ 








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rO 




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14) 




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ft. 




c> 




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e 




ts 




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s 




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co 


o 


cd 


o, 


Wh 


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^ 


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ss 


so 


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rs 


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8 




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o 



a 



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CO 

d 

w 

l-J 
m 

< 







CO 


to 






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o 




o 


<N 




© 


e-T 








<M 


i— l 






vD 


■* 




* 


r-T 








CO 


eo 






o< 


CO 




ce 


CO 








iO 


ft 




OR 


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1 


o3 








w 








w 








o 








5 








HH 








13 


9 


CO 


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N 


l-H 




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Ph 








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h 








o 




m 


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« 


CO 


CO 


M 


lO 






rt 


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W 








a 








<j 














A 












o 


CO 






lO 


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to 


c^ 






H 


csT 






C 


CO 

03 


1 




91 


CM 






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CM 


1 




W 


CO 








• 


• 






















o> 








o 








«H 








v - y 


^ 






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OS 






O 


o 






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c: 






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i— i 






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eo 






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© 








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a 


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e9 


rt 






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o 


O 






H 


H 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



243 



r~o 
ft 

<~H 



&3 

© 
e 



O 



CQ 



^c; 


or, 




O 




05 

>H 


sJ* 


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r> 


9 


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co 


^ 




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K 


V 


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rhS. 




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© 





■+0 


s 




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£ 




« 






<u 


O 


S 


$*, 


•-H 


O 




S- 





C£ 


^ 





Oh 









o 

6 

<j 

Eh 







CO 


CM ->*i 





CO 


00 


C5 


10 


c< 


CD 


-H 


O 


— 1 


OS 


Cl 


r-t 


in 


CO 


OS 1 




f)J 




on 


lO 


CM CO 


cc 


00 


l~ 





CO 


CI 


O 


t- 


CC; 





I- 


CO 


CC 


Cl 


iC 


in 


| 


CO 




Ol 


C5 00 


■* 


r-t 


.0 


CO 


m 


cc 


05 


Cl 


CC 


CO 


CC 


Cl 


rH 


x* 


CD' 


ir- 1 




CM 


rx 
< 


% 


05 


IO 00 

tr- 


00 


"* 


-t< 




rH 


10 


-* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"* 


CM 


Cl 


Cl 


Cl 


r-t 


r-t 1 




O 

CO 

r-T 




CO 


cs co 


CM 


O 


CD 


CC 


1— 


r— 


t- 


CO 


Cl 


CC 


"* 


CC 


CD 


-r 


CC 


"* 1 


I- 




O 




lO 


00 C5 


C5 


CD 


O 


CI 


cc 


OS 


iO 


OS 


cc 


CD 


O 




CC 


CC 


05 


m 


Cl 




H 




lO 


CC^ OS_ 


r-< 


00 


t> 


cc 


CI 


lO 


Cl 


-CD 


X 


rH 


O 


x* 







CM 


X 


X 
















































s> 


00 


00" r-^" 


t- 


CD 




-rh 


CI 


-* 


CO 


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t- 


Cl 


os 


in 


X 


t- 


CM 


rH 






0) 


CO 


O CD 


-f 


CM 


"* 


"* 


C5 


m 





I— 


OS 


Cl 


m 


^-t 


r-* 


Cl 


X 


OS 


CO 






Ph 


X* 


O x»l 

XTI 


X* 


(M 


CI 


IO 


CI 


CI 


Cl 


r-t 




Cl 


i-^ 


rH 


rH 


rH 






x*_ 

x" 










Ox 00 


05 


_! 





CI 


I— ( 


CD. 





CD 


cc 


m 


CO 


CC 


Cl 


O 


X 


O 1 


xH 


X 








O t- 


O 







1- 


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cc> 


in 


CD 


CD 


CO 


1- 


cc 


CC 


Cl 


IO 




X 


x* 






1 


m x* 


CD 


1- 


CD 


CD 


CO 


Cl 




CD 


CD 


CO 


CD 


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cc 


10 







t- 






*# 








































CO 
CM 






IO O 




CO 


O 


CD 


CO 


cc 


■* 


Cl 


Cl 


m 


x* 


cc 




-f 


X 


C5 


t— 








CO CM 


O 




CO 


O 


CO 


m 


t- 


r-t 


Cl 


r-t 


CO 


1-t 




CC 


CO 




CO 
















— 1 


























CO 
















00 


























X 


X 




IS) 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


x* 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


x* 


-H 














Ci 


























OS 














































O 




Ci 


CO 10 


CO 





CI 


r-H 


CI 


in 


CD 


CD 


OS 


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-f 


CD 


x* 


Zj 





IO 


rH 


rH 






CM 


CO r- 


CM 


1- 


CO 


CI 


os 





rH 


CC 


t-> 


CC 


Cl 





OS 


OS 


-rt- 


t- 


xj" 


rH 






OS 


xH CM 


l^ 




I- 


co 


I- 


c^ 


Cl 


CD 


1— 


m 


cc 


C. 


os 


H" 


t- 


m 


X 

























































t-^ 


>o 


cd" 


0" 


cT 


t~^ 


CC 


l> 


CD 


1- 


r+ 


*i 




Cl 


Cl 


01 


CO 


O 








I— O 


O 


cc 


CO 


IO 





Cl 


10 




X 




CO 


DC 


I- 


l- 


CO 


iO 


r~ 


co 








*i CM 


CM 


^ - 


rH 


CI 


r-^ 


r- 




rH 




1 — 1 














T-H^ 










-* 


































CO 
















** 


























xj* 


C5 




iy 


' 


1 ! 


1 


1 


1 


D5 
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1 


1 


1 


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1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


' 


1 


1 


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OS 


O 




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00 iO 


cc 


— 


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~ 


cc 


05 


m 


r^ 


m 


—r 


cc 


IO 


05 


CD 


3 


X 


OS 


X 






c- 


lO -* 


00 


c 


cc 


CC 


"* 


<* 


m 




Cl 


Cl 


CD 


tr- 


r^ 


CC 


CD 


CO 




t- 






iC 


r- 1 t~ 


05 







X 


C2 


Cl 


cc 


lO 


O 


CM 


-r 


i- 


t- 


CC 


X 


1— 


IO 














































t-. 




00 


l-H 


CO t^ 


CO 


I-- 




10 


-f 




1^ 




Cl" 


CD 




ce 


05 


OS 


x# 


05 


IO 


eo 








-<* O 


I- 


CM 


CI 


OS 


t- 


Cl 


rH 


rH 


cc 


in 


Cl 












IO 


CM 








CO 


































or 

l-H 


~X 




,-4 


05 O 


x^ 


O 


CD 


-H 


00 


X 


CD 


-* 


-H 


m 


01 


10 


Cl 


x* 





rH 


x* 






lO 


-«*• IO 


-r 


CM 


x* 


CC 


cc 


(M 


IO 


1* 


Cl 


cc 


05 


C4 


CD 


CO 


m 


x* 


X 


CD 




O 


t- 


O -* 




00 


CO 


w 


t- 


L— 


CD^ 


CD 


» 


OS 


c 


l- 


1- 


CD 


m 


O 


10 


















































W4 


10 


■* O 


t- 


OS 


c-. 


1^ 


1- 


CC 


t~ 


** 




CD 


CD 


x* 


Cl 


Cl 




-* 


X 


O 








00 lO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cc 


l-H 


r^ 




Cl 


(M 


C4 




rt 




rt 


rH 


CO 

10 


r-t 




00 


CO 1— 1 


CD 


cc 


s 


X* 


c> 


CO 


CD 


05 


x* 


X 


~ 


■n 


C5 


CD 





O 


CO 


CD 






X* 


10 10 


tr- 


OS 


t~ 





lO 


cc 


CC 


IO 





r-f 


-H 


Cl 


X 




in 


C5 


X 


t- 









iO lO 


IO 


t- 


iC 


1— 1 


"* 


os 




CO 


CC 


m 


CD 


ic 


eo 


c 




CO 


10 






H 








































CM 




co 


t^ CM 


"* 


o< 


IO 


CD 


CD 


Cl" 


CD 


m 




Cl 


x* 


x* 


Cl 


os 




t- 


X 


O 




CM 


CO X 


CD 






c> 


CI 


CM 


r-^ 




cc 


Cl 














OS 
lO 


eo 










































r-^ 






cc 


l^ 


■M 




CD 




cc 





O 


t- 




xH 














O 


CM 




<* 


CM 


. M 


iO 




O 




OS 


Cl 


O 


i- 




x* 














CO 


r-i 






1 o_ 


r^ 


1 


00 


1 


IO 


os 


t- 


» 


1 




1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


I-H 






FN 




00" 


0? 








05" 


cT 


IO 


rH 


















CO 

xH 


OS 




CM 


co r— 




-+ 


CC 


CI 


»o 


cc 


O 


C 




CC 














CM 


O 






00 


l~ CO 




.0 


cc 


CO 


1^ 


Cl 


IO 


O 




CD' 














CO 


CM 




C0 


O 


CO 


1 


CO 


N 


CI 


t-^ 


CM 


CO 


»* 


1 


1— 1 




1 




1 


1 


1 


CM 




GQ 

H 

HI 

ft 


H 


OS 


CO CO 




t- 


cf 


CO 


cd" 


10" 


e=f 




















x*" 


IO 

CO 




iO 










CI 






Cl 




















x* 






CM 


































CO 




(X) 




t-. 


































t- 


r~ 


r-t 


1 


1 00 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


l 


1 


1 


X 







FN 




CO 


































CO 


CD 




(M 


-0* CO 









0: 


cc 
























x* 


in 






1^ 


<M 05 






c 


t- 


1- 
























x* 


X 




© 


°1 


I- iO_ 


1 


1 


—._ 


eo 


CD 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




00^ 






w 


t- 


irT eo 






cT 


Cl" 


























cT 


© 
eo 






IO 


C5 


































CO 










































r^ 






-# 









-* 




























X 


cs 






O 


eo 






00 




























rH 


CO 




<# 


O^ 


00 1 


1 


1 


-* 




1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 






w 


as 


t-^" 






cf 




























05" 


CO 






10 


i- 


































CO 










































•~< 




90 




•^ 


































x*l 


m 




1 


-* I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


| 


1 


1 


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1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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w 




CM 


































CM 


O 




t- 


CM 


































OS 


05 






CM 


03 




































eo 




© 


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in 1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 




1 


1 


l 


I 


1 


"\ 






M 


co" 


co" 


































CO 


CO 
CM 






5-1 


05 


































CM 










































"H 






. "O 


CD 




































X 




ce 


rH 


O 


































CM 






C5 


CO 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 






| 


1 


1 


I 




1 


1 


I 


1 


C-*_ 






09 


CD~ 


CO 


































OS 


t- 






x* 


































x* 


X 












































O 


eo 




1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 




I 


1 


1 




I 


1 


1-^ 






<* 




eo" 

CM 


































eo 


x# 




10 


CO 


































X 


— . 




w 


t^ 




































X 


tr- 







00^ 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


cc_ 






* 


00 


cd" 


































xjT 

CM 


x* 




r-l 


iO 


































1 CO 


t- 






CO 


t- 


































O 


eo 




ao 


10 


I-H 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


fc- 












































CM 

x* 




** 


"** 


05 


































CO 






00 


CO 


































CM 






l-H 




































CM 






00 




































X 


CO 






rH 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


I— 1 


t— 







'*_ 




































xdH_ 









x# 

— 1 




































x*" 


CM 




Q 


PI 










































H 


ei 




































O 

XH 

"cl 

Hi 
O 

H 


CO 
CJ 






a 

w 

M 


O 
ft 
O 

rH 
<X> 
S3 


Water Wo 
Boston, 
Somerville. 


Maiden, 
Chelsea, 
Everett. 


Quincy, 
Med ford, 
Melrose, 
Eevere, 1 
Watertown. 


Arlington, 

Milton, . 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 

Belmont, 

Lexington, 

Nahant, 

Swampscott 


"3 

+H 





244 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 41. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 
Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 
31, 1909, and the Number of Services and Meters installed during the Year 
1909. 



City or Town. 


Services. 


Meters. 


Fire 
Hydrants. 


Services 
Installed. 


Meters 
Installed. 


Boston, . 








96,132 


11,690 


8,330 


1,151 


6,584 


Somerville, 








12,018 


5,147 


1,056 


211 


822 


Maiden, . 








7,303 


6,978 


437 


171 


147 


Chelsea, . 








6,613 


2,212 


331 


99 


847 


Everett, . 








5,320 


843 


525 


81 


339 


Qnincy, . 








6,814 


2,032 


776 


365 


94 


Medford, . 








4,624 


2,594 


530 


10S 


1,037 


Melrose, . 








3,510 


3,510 


316 


43 


194 


Kevere,i . 








3,214 


590 


177 


193 


29S 


Watertown, 








1,973 


1,973 


338 


54 


54 


Arlington, 








2,032 


1,121 


384 


56 


129 


Milton, 








1,380 


1,380 


347 


52 


52 


Winthrop, 








2,320 


1,533 


183 


103 


1,126 


Stoneham, 








1,447 


430 


117 


31 


256 


Belmont, 








883 


883 


171 


4S 


48 


Lexington, 








780 


362 


128 


42 


117 


Nahant, . 








398 


179 


75 


8 


4S 


Swamp scott, . 








1,439 


1,398 


134 


47 


189 


Total, 


158,200 


44,855 


14,355 


2,863 


12,381 



i Includes small portion of Saugus. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



245 






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246 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CD 

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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



247 



Appendix 'No. 5 . 



Water Works Statistics for the Year 1909. 
The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict, which includes the following cities and towns : — 



City or Town. 



Population, 
Census of 1905. 



Estimated 
Population 
July 1, 1909. 



Boston 

Somerville 

Maiden 

Chelsea 

Newton, 1 

Everett, 

Quincy 

Medford 

HydePark.i 

Melrose, 

Revere, . 

Watertown 

Arlington 

Milton 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, . 

Lexington, 

Belmont, 

Nahant, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 
Saugus, 2 



595.3S0 

69,272 

38,037 

37,289 

36,827 

29,111 

28,076 

19,6S6 

14,510 

14,295 

12,659 

11,258 

9,668 

7,054 

7,034 

6,332 

5,141 

4,530 

4,360 

922 



951,441 
200 



632,960 

75,440 

41,280 

33,600 

42,600 

33,280 

31,440 

21,890 

15,500 

15,350 

14,830 

12,630 

10,700 

7,800 

9,140 

6,750 

5,760 

5,370 

5,000 

940 



1,022,260 
280 



i No water supplied to these places during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 
2 Only a small portion of Saugus is supplied with water. 



248 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Mode of Supply. 

25 per cent, by gravity. 
75 per cent, by pumping. 

Pumping. 

Chestnut Hill High-service Station: — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintarcl 

Iron Works and E. P. Allis Company. 
Description of coal used : — Bituminous : New River, Blossburg, Imperial, 

Vulcan and Logan. Anthracite: Buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins: 

bituminous $3.85 to $4.19, buckwheat $2.73. Average price per gross 

ton $3.70. Per cent, ashes, 9.5. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Station : — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Vulcan. Anthracite : buckwheat. 

Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $3.86 to $4.06, buckwheat $2.61. 

Average price per gross ton $3.44. Per cent, ashes, 9.6. 

Spot Pond Station: — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company 

and Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Davis. Anthracite : screenings. 

Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $4.19 to $4.25, screenings $2.24 to 

$2.50. Average price per gross ton $3.43. Per cent, ashes, 13.2. 



Chestnut Hill High-service 
Station. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, . 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons) , . 

Average dynamic head (feet) 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, .... 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot 



16,000,000 

2,124,272 

$7,502.01 

1,321.95 

120.04 

622.31 

64,270,000 

85.675 

.0473 



20,000,000 

1,565,681 

$6,528.08 

1,404.59 

127. S4 

S97.ll 

103,220,000 

$4.(548 

.0364 



30,000,000 

8,625,393 

8:12,447.96 

10.70S.46 

130.25 

1,241.50 

138,840,000 

$3.03 

.0233 



No, 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



249 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons) 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, . 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 

Average dynamic head (feet), 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot, .... 



Chestnut Hill 

Low-service 

Station. 



Engine Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 



105,000,000 

7,160,584 

$32,171.73 

19,183.42 

45.82 

2,679.03 

105,380,000 

$1,677 

.0366 



Spot Pond 
Station. 



Engines Nos. 
and 9. 



30,000,000 

2,424,886 

$14,048.86 

2,693.51 

129.76 

1,110.78 

123,760,000 

$5,216 

.0402 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the nineteen cities and towns 

supplied wholly or partially during the year 1909, . . 965,490 

Total consumption (gallons), pump basis, .... 43,575,790,000 

Average daily consumption (gallons), pump basis, . . 119,386,000 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, punrp basis, . . . 123.7 



Distribution. 



Owned and 

operated 

by Metropolitan 

Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



Total in District 

supplied 

by Metropolitan 

Water Works. 



Kinds of pipe used, .... 

Sizes, 

Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 
Length in use (miles), .... 

Stop gates added, 

Stop gates now in use, ..... 

Service pipes added, .... 

Service pipes now in use, 

Meters added, 

Meters now in use, . . . . 

Fire hydrants added 

Fire hydrants now in use, 



60 to 6 inch. 

7.88 

92.53 

32 

404 



_ 2 

60 to 4 inch. 
33.77 
1,602.62 



2,863 

158,200 

12,381 

44,855 

276 

14,355 



1 Cast-iron and cement-lined wrought iron. 

2 Cast-iron, cement lined wrought-iron and kalamine. 



250 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix ~N o . 6. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



6S 



691 



<0l 



721 



73 



78 



2. 

WORK. 



Additions to the pumping 
plant at Deer Island, 
Boston Harbor. 

450 tons, Georges Creek 
Cumberland Coal for 
Alewife Brook pump- 
ing station. 

6,150 tons of coal : — 
2,250 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Bos- 
ton pumping station. 
900 tons for Charlestown 
pumping station. 

Extensions of engine and 
coal houses at Deer Is- 
land, Boston Harbor. 

Additions to the pumping 
plant at East Boston. 



Extension and repair of 
engine, boiler and 
screen houses and new 
coal house at East Bos- 
ton. 

2,950 tons of coal : — 
2,500 tons for East Bos- 
ton pumping station. 
450 tons for Alewife 
Brook pumping station 

3,050 tons of coal : — 
2,100 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
950 tons for Charlestown 
pumping station. 

Additions to the boiler 
plant at East Boston 
pumping station. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



10 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



5. 

Lowest. 



),230 00 2 



1.60 per 
ton. 



.15 per 


$3.75 per 


ton. 2 


ton. 


.22 per 


$3.69 per 


ton. 


ton. 2 


00 per 


$3.95 per 


ton. 


ton. 2 



$37,294 00 



123,722 00 



$3.96 per 

ton. 
$4.30 per 

ton. 



$3.85 per 

ton. 
$3.65 per 

ton. 

$31,933 00 



$51,990 00 



$4.50 per 
ton. 2 



$34,495 00 2 



37,000 00 



110,940 00 2 



$3.69 per 
ton. 2 

$4.25 per 
ton. 2 



$3.74 per 

ton. 2 
$3.64 per 

ton. - 

$29,000 00 



6. 

Contractor. 



Allis-Chalmers Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Locke Coal Co., Mai- 
den. 



Davis Coal and Coke 
Co., Boston. 



Walter A. Wentworth 
Co., Boston. 



Allis-Chalmers Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Woodbury & Leigh- 
ton Co., Boston. 



New England Coal 
and Coke Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Staples Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Robb-Mumford Boiler 
Co., South Framing- 
ham. 



1 Contract completed. 



2 Contract based on this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



251 



Appendix X o . 6 



the Year 1909 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 



Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1909. 



10. 

Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1909. 



Nov. 2, 1908, 



July 8, 1908, 



July 13, 1908, 



Mar. 8, 1909, 



June 5, 1909, 



Aug. 13, 1909, 



June 18, 1909, 



June 25, 1909, 



Dec. 15, 1909, 



June 1, 1909, 



June 1, 1909, 



Sept. 13, 1909, 



For extensions of the engine and coal houses com- 
plete with all appurtenances. 



For furnishing and setting' up, complete and ready 
to operate, one pumping engine actuating ver- 
tical shaft and centrifugal pump with connec- 
tions. 

For extension and repair of engine, boiler and 
screen houses and for building new coal house 
complete with all appurtenances. 



$3.69 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at East 

Boston pumping station. 
$4.25 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at 

Alewife Brook pumping station. 



$3.74 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Deer 

Island pumping station. 
$3.64 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at 

Charlestown pumping station. 

For furnishing-and erecting six vertical fire tube 
boilers on foundations furnished by the Board, 
with smoke flues and galleries. 



$34,615 00 1 



1,762 47 



24,072 87 



34,755 56 



8,075 00 



4,175 07 



6,334 10 



252 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the 
Contracts retating to the South 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2. 
WORK. 



64i 



651 



671 



ru 



70 



Part of Section 85, Exten- 
sion of the High-level 
Sewer, Brighton, 69- 
inch by 72-inch concrete 
sewer in tunnel. 

Part of Section 85, Exten- 
sion of the High-level 
Sewer, Brighton, 69- 
inch by 72-inch concrete 
sewer in tunnel. 

Section 86, Extension of 
the High-level Sewer, 
Brighton, 69-inch by 72- 
inch and 72-inch by 48- 
inch concrete sewers,in 
trench. 

3,400 tons of coal : — 
2,400 tons forward Street 

pumping station. 
500 tons for Quincy 

pumping station. 
500 tons for Nut Island 

screen-house. 

2,500 tons of coal : — 
2,100 tons forward Street 

pumping station. 
400 tons for Nut Island 

screen-house. 

400 ton s of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



14 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to Low- 
est. 



$94,150 00 



71,400 00 



38,716 00 



1.55 per 

ton. 
1.95 per 

ton. 
1.20 per 

ton .2 



1.14 per 
ton. 
1. 10 per 
ton. 

1.40 per 
ton. 



Lowest. 



$92,400 00 2 



67,450 00 2 



38,054 50 2 



$4.41 per 
ton. 2 

$4.45 per 
ton. 2 

$4.15 per 
ton. 



$4.09 per 
ton. 2 

$3.74 per 
ton. 2 

$4.15 per 
ton. 2 



6. 

Contractor. 



D. F. O'Connell Co., 
Boston. 



Hugh Nawn Contract- 
ing Co., Boston. 



Charles J. Jacobs Co., * 
Boston. 



Davis Coal and Coke 
Co., Boston. 



Staples Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Neponset River Coal 
Co., Dorchester. 



1 Contract completed. 



2 Contract based on this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



253 



Year 1909 — Sewerage Works — Continued. 
Metropolitan System. 



7. 



Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1909. 



10. 

Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1909. 



Nov. 25, 1907, Feb. 13, 1909, 



Nov. 25, 1907, 



Aug. 4, 1908, 



July 13, 1908, 



June 25, 1909, 



June 30, 1909, 



Dec. 9, 190S, 



Mar. 5, 1909, 



June 1, 1909, 



$4.09 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at 

Ward Street pumping station. 
$3.74 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at 

Nut Island screen Jaouse. 



4.15 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at 
Quincy pumping station. 



$92,884 02 



70,432 00 



37,423 4S 



11,127 54 



3,763 98 



431 00 



254 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1909 — Sewerage Works 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. J 



Value of Work 

done December 

31, 1909. 



North Metropolitan System, 5 contracts, 
South Metropolitan System, 3 contracts, 



Total of 8 contracts made and pending during the year 1909, 



$77,445 56 
200,739 50 



$278,185 06 



i In this summary the cost of day work and contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 255 



Appendix ISTo. 7. 



Financial Statement presented to the Geneeal Court on 

January 12, 1910. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board respectfully presents 
the following abstract of the account of its doings, receipts, expenditures, 
disbursements, assets and liabilities for the year ending November 30, 
1909, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of 
the year 1906. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 

Construction. 
The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan Water 
acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the expenditures 
for the construction and acquisition of works, and the balance available 
on December 1, 1909, have been as follows : — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, $41,798,000 00 

Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropolitan Water District, 

paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of real estate, and from labor, tools and supplies, which are 
placed to the credit of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1909, ...... $5,715 03 

For the period prior to December 1, 1908 161,336 53 

167,051 56 

$42,055,051 56 
Amount approved for payment by the Board out of the Metropolitan Water Loan 
Fund: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1909, $334,760 00 

For the period prior to December 1, 1908, 40,666,195 40 

41,000,955 40 

Balance December 1, 1909 $1,054,096 16 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loans outstanding at the be- 
ginning of the fiscal year was $40,500,000. At the end of the year the 
amount of the loans was $40,898,000. The Metropolitan Water Loan 
Sinking Fund amounted at the beginning of the year to $6,400,807.56 
and at the end of the year to $7,203,406.48. The net decrease in the 
debt for the Metropolitan Water Works was $404,598.92. 



256 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and operation of works, for the 
year ending November 30, 1909 8416,500 

Amount appropriated for the improvement of the Cochituate watershed, . 30,000 

$446,500 00 

Amount approved by Board for maintenance and operation of works during year 
ending November 30, 1909 381,350 97 



Balance December 1, 1909, $65,149 03 

This balance includes the sum of $30,000 appropriated for the im- 
provement of the Cochituate watershed, which sum has not been ex- 
pended, as it was deemed necessary to delay the active work upon the 
improvements until the coming season. 

The Board has also received during the year ending November 30, 
1909, $11,937.03 from rentals, land products and other sources, which, 
according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act, are applied by 
the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the pajmient of interest on the 
Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking fund requirements, and expenses 
of maintenance and operation of works, thus reducing the amount of the 
assessment upon the Metropolitan Water District for the year. 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging to 
the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for ad- 
mission to the District, have been applied as follows : — 

For the year prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities and towns of the 
District, as provided by section 3 of the Metropolitan Water Act, .... $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 1, 1908, applied 
to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, as provided by chapter 238 of the 
Acts of 1907, 14,076 04 

For the year beginning December 1, 1908, and ending November 30, 1909, applied to 
the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, as provided by said last-named act, . 2,775 17 



$236,716 86 



Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for 
the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the receipts which 
are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expenditures for con- 
struction, are given below, as follows : — 






No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 257 



North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, including those for the 
Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions and North System enlarge- 
ment and extension, $6,573,865 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources, which 
are placed to the credit of the North Metropolitan System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1909 10,576 01 

For the period prior to December 1, 1908, 35,731 17 

Amount approved for payment by the Board 1 out of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Loan Fund North System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1909, - $137,924 83 

For the period prior to December 1, 190S, - 6,165,415 67 

$6,620,172 91 $6,303,340 50 

Balance December 1, 1909, - . $316,832 41 

South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, appjied to the construction of 
the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset valley sewer, High-level 

Sewer and Extension, $8,867,046 27 

Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and from miscellaneous 
sources, which are placed to the credit of the South Metropolitan 
System : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1909, 325 10 

For the period prior to December 1, 1908, 11,08172 

Amount approved by the Board for payment as follows : — 

On account of the Charles River valley sewer $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, 911,531 46 

On account of the High-level Sewer and Extension : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1909 64,341 63 

For the period prior to December 1, 1908, 7,007,590 02 

§8,878,453 09 $8,783,509 38 

Balance December 1, 1909, . $94,943 71 

The loans for the Metropolitan Sewerage Works outstanding at the 
beginning of the fiscal year amounted to $15,027,912, and at the end 
of the year to $15,327,912. The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Sinking Fund was at the beginning of the fiscal year $1,491,275.67, and 
at the end of the year was $1,672,017.97. The net debt accordingly in- 
creased from $13,536,636.33 to $13,655,894.03, a total increase of 
$119,257.70. 

Maintenance. 
North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1909 $146,900 00 

Appropriated in the year 1908 for the restoration and equipment of the East Boston 

pumping station, injured by fire ($40,000), remaining, 17,284 43 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are returned to the appro- 
priation : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1909, 1,582 12 

$165,766 55 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1909, 144,195 03 

Balance December 1, 1909 $21 571 52 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board. 



258 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

This balance of $21,571.52 includes the sum of $13,884.43 which still 
remains out of the special appropriation for the restoration and equip- 
ment of the East Boston pumping station, which have not yet been 
completed. The general balance remaining is consequently $7,687.09. 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1909 $105,700 00 

Receipts from sales of property and for pumping, which are returned to the appro- 
priation : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1909 255 54 

$105,955 54 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1909 96,538 50 

Balance December 1, 1909, $9,417 04 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 259 



Appendix NTo. 8. 



Legislation of the Year 1909 affecting the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



ACTS OF 1909. 

[Chapter 74.] 

An Act to exempt the towns of hingham and hull 
from certain provisions of law relative to the 
metropolitan water system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section twenty-three of chapter four hundred 1895, 488, § 23, 

x amended. 

and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and (Hingham 



ninety-five is hereby amended by inserting after the word exempted.) 

" town ", in the first line, the words : — except the towns of 

Hingham and Hull, — so as to read as follows : — Section 23. 

No city or town, except the towns of Hingham and Hull, 

any part of which is within ten miles of the state house, or 

any water company owning a water pipe system in any such 

city or town shall, except in case of emergency, use, for 

domestic purposes water from any source not now used by it 

except as herein provided or as shall be hereafter authorized 

by the legislature. If any town or towns in said district shall 

take the franchise, works and property in such town or towns, 

of any water company, the compensation to be allowed and 

paid therefor shall not be increased or decreased by reason 

of the provisions of this act. No town in said water district 

now supplied with water by a water company owning the 

water pipe system in such town, shall introduce water from 

the metropolitan water works until it shall first have acquired 

the works of such company. 

Section 2. This act shall be given effect as if the excep- Not t0 affect 
tion were originally a part of said section twenty-three of certain rights, 
chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year 



260 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

eighteen hundred and ninety-five, except that it shall not be 
construed as affecting the provisions of chapter three hundred 
and thirty-six of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-seven, so far as the same apply to said towns of Hing- 
ham and Hull, and shall not be so construed as to affect the 
rights of any third party for damages for an}^ taking made 
prior to the passage of this act. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 18, 1909. 



[Chapter 90.] 

An Act making appropriations for the maintenance 
and improvement of the metropolitan water sys- 
TEM. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
^?mafnte- tion Section 1. The sums hereinafter mentioned are appro- 
ropoi e itan met " Plated, to be paid out of the Metropolitan Water Maintenance 
waterworks. Fund, f r the maintenance and operation of the metropolitan 

water system for the cities and towns in what is known as 

the metropolitan water district, during the fiscal yean ending 

on the thirtieth day of November, nineteen hundred and 

nine, to wit : — 

For the maintenance and operation of the metropolitan 

water system, a sum not exceeding four hundred and sixteen 

thousand five hundred dollars. 

For the improvement of the Cochituate watershed, a sum 

not exceeding thirty thousand dollars. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

[Approved February 25, 1909. 



[Chapter 104.] 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 
south metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
Appropriation Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and five 

for mainte- ° 

mSro )oiitan th thousand seven hundred dollars is hereby appropriated, to be 

system? 6 P a ^ ou * °^ the South Metropolitan System Maintenance 

Fund, for the cost of maintenance and operation of the south 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 261 

metropolitan system of sewage disposal, comprising a part 
of Boston, the cities of Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and 
the towns of Brookline, Watertown, Dedham, Hyde Park 
and Milton, during the fiscal year ending on the thirtieth day 
of November, nineteen hundred and nine. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect npon its passage. 
[Approved February 26, 1909. 



[Chapter 105.] 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 
north metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and forty- ^f^3Sj. tton 
six thousand nine hundred dollars is hereby appropriated, to ^Sp^ma?* 1 
be paid out of the North Metropolitan System Maintenance gyS ge 
Fund, for the maintenance and operation of the system of 
sewage disposal for the cities and towns included in what is 
known as the north metropolitan system, during the fiscal year 
ending on the thirtieth day of November, nineteen hundred 
and nine. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 26, 1909. 



[Chapter 177.] 

An Act relative to the use and care of water meters 
in the cities and towns of the metropolitan water 
district. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section three of chapter five hundred and 1907, 524, § 3, 
twenty-four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
seven is hereby amended by striking out the last sentence and 
inserting in place thereof the following : — It shall be the 
duty of the metropolitan water and sewerage board to super- Metropolitan 
vise and promote the enforcement of the provisions of this sewerage 
act, and if any city, town, district or corporation violates or vise and en- 
neglects in any respect to comply with the provisions hereof, provisions of 
said board shall forthwith give written notice of such viola- act. 
tion or neglect, together with the facts relative thereto, to the 
attorney-general for his action in the premises. The supreme 
judicial court shall have jurisdiction, upon an information 



262 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



(Care and 
maintenance of 
water meters, 
etc.) 



1907,524, §4, 
amended. 



Penalties for 
refusal to in- 
stall water 
meters. 



When to take 
effect. 



in equity filed by the attorney-general, to enforce all the terms 
and provisions of this act, — so as to read as follows : — Sec- 
tion 3. Meters shall receive the necessary care and mainte- 
nance to secure proper efficiency and shall be tested or replaced 
by the city, town, district or water company whenever there 
is reason to believe that the records furnished by them are 
inaccurate, or whenever the service furnished is in other re- 
spects inefficient. Cities, towns, districts and corporations 
may make rules and regulations relative to the care, main- 
tenance and protection of meters, and for properly ascer- 
taining and recording the amount of water actually used 
during specified periods by each water consumer. It shall 
be the duty of the metropolitan water and sewerage board 
to supervise and promote the enforcement of the provisions 
of this act, and if any city, town, district or corporation vio- 
lates or neglects in any respect to comply with the provisions 
hereof, said board shall forthwith give written notice of 
such violation or neglect, together with the facts relative 
thereto, to the attorney-general for his action in the premises. 
The supreme judicial court shall have jurisdiction, upon an 
information in equity filed by the attorney-general, to enforce 
all the terms and provisions of this act. 

Section 2. Said chapter five hundred and twenty-four is 
hereby further amended by striking out section four and in- 
serting in place thereof the following : — Section J/.. If a city, 
town, district or corporation in any year neglects or refuses 
to comply with the provisions of section one, it shall forfeit 
to the commonwealth for the use of the metropolitan water 
district not less than twenty dollars and not more than one 
hundred dollars for each day after the expiration of said year 
during which such violation or neglect continues. The pen- 
alties or forfeitures which may be incurred hereunder may be 
recovered in an action of contract brought in the county of 
Suffolk in the name of the commonwealth, or may be recovered 
by an information in equity in the name of the attorney- 
general at the relation of the metropolitan water and sewerage 
board, brought in the supreme judicial court for the county 
of Suffolk. 

Section 3. Section one of this act shall take effect upon 
its passage, and section two shall take effect on the first day 
of January, nineteen hundred and ten. [Approved March 
IS, 1909. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 263 

[Chapter 243.] 

An Act relative to payments in lieu of taxes on prop- 
erty HELD BY THE COMMONWEALTH FOR WATER SUPPLY 
PURPOSES. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. All general laws relating to annual payments Provisions of 

° . . ,, law relative to 

in lieu of taxes on property held by a city or town in another payment in a 

lieu of taxes to 

city or town for water supply purposes shall, so far as they apply to land 

j rr J r r > i j . neld for metro- 

are applicable, apply to the metropolitan water supply and to poiitan water 

the lands held by the commonwealth and used by the metro- 
politan water and sewerage board for such supply in cities and 
towns other than the towns of Ashland, Boylston, Holden, . 
Hopkinton, Sterling and West Boylston. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 31, 1909. 






[Chapter 258.] 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage BOARD TO SUPPLY WATER TO SECTIONS OF CITIES AND 
TOWNS NOT INCLUDED IN THE METROPOLITAN WATER DIS- 
TRICT. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section one of chapter one hundred and eighty- 1902, 189, §1, 

• . . amended. 

nine of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and two is hereby (including city 

. or town.) 

amended by inserting after the word " any ", in the second 
line, the words : — city, town or, — and by inserting after the 
word " the ", in the eighth line, the words : — city, town or, 
— so as to read as follows: — Section 1. The metropolitan Metropolitan 

x n in j?j.*j_x'j?-i water and 

water and sewerage board may from time to time furnish sewerage 

11 'j. j. 1 i • i ji board may fur- 

Water to any city, town or water company which owns the nisn water 

■ , • ■• _» ., , j, j, under certain 

water pipe system in a section of a city or town, for the sup- conditions, 
ply of such section, although the city or town, or a part of the 
city or town, is within ten miles of the state house, and the 
city or town has not been admitted into the metropolitan 
water district, on payment by the city, town or water com- 
pany of such sum of money as the said board may determine : 
provided, however, that the sum so determined in any case p roV iso. 
shall in the opinion of the board exceed the proper proportion 



264 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



of the entire assessment which would be imposed upon the city 
or town were it a part of the metropolitan district. 

Section" 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 2, 1909. 



Dug pond in 
Natick exclud- 
ed from the 
metropolitan 
water system. 



[Chapter 282.] 

An Act to exclude dug pond in the town of natick from 
the metropolitan water system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
may close and terminate the existing connection between Lake 
Cochituate and Dug pond in the town of Natick, and transfer 
and release to the town of Natick all interest in and control 
over the waters of the said pond. Thereafter Dug pond shall 
not be used as a source of water supply by the metropolitan 
water district or by any city or town, nor shall it be allowed 
to overflow into Lake Cochituate or be connected with the 
water supply of said district or of any city or town; and said 
pond shall be subject to the control and regulation of the park 
commissioners of the town of Natick, who are hereby author- 
ized to impose penalties for the violation of any regulations 
made by them in respect to the said pond. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 9, 1909. 



Appropria- 
tions for con- 
struction for 
certain pur- 
poses in metro- 
politan 
water district. 



[Chapter 320.] 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage BOARD TO MAKE CERTAIN IMPROVEMENTS IN THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The sum of nine hundred and thirty-nine thou- 
sand five hundred dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid 
out of the treasury of the commonwealth from the Metropoli- 
tan Water Loan Fund for the following purposes : — For a 
sixty inch main from the terminus of the Weston aqueduct to 
connect with the present mains near Chestnut Hill reservoir; 
for additional pumping machinery for the high service at the 
Chestnut Hill pumping station; for the construction of sewers 
and cesspools and for other improvements necessary for the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 265 

watershed of the Wachusett reservoir ; for a new main for the 
water supply of the town of Winthrop; and for small exten- 
sions of the distribution system. 

Section 2. For the purposes aforesaid the metropolitan issue of bonds 

1 x x authorized. 

water and sewerage board may, in addition to providing for 
the improvements for which expenditures are authorized by 
chapter five hundred and fifty-eight of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and eight, expend any sum heretofore ap- 
propriated for the construction of the metropolitan water 
works. To meet the further expenditures incurred under the 
provisions of this act, and not so provided for, the treasurer 
and receiver general shall, from time to time, issue upon the 
request of said board, bonds in the name and behalf of the 
commonwealth, to be designated on the face thereof, Metro- 
politan Water Loan, Act of 1909, to an amount not exceeding 
nine hundred thousand dollars, in addition to the sum of forty 
million eight hundred and ninety-eight thousand dollars au- 
thorized to be issued under the provisions of chapter four hun- 
dred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and ninety-five, chapter four hundred and fifty-three of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and one, chapter three hun- 
dred and sixty-seven of the acts of the year nineteen hundred 
and six and chapter five hundred and fifty-eight of the acts 
of the year nineteen hundred and eight, and the provisions of 
said chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-five and of acts in amend- 
ment thereof and in addition thereto shall apply to this addi- 
tional loan. 

Section 3. All sums which shall be received from the Application of 
town of Swampscott for the admission of said town into the from town of 
metropolitan water district shall be paid into the Metropoli- for admission, 
tan Water Loan Fund, and may be applied by the metropoli- 
tan water and sewerage board to the construction of works 
made necessary by the admission of said town into the metro- 
politan water district. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 26, 1909. 



266 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



A dequate 
works to be 
provided by 
cities and 
towns, etc., for 
the treatment 
of sewage. 



Regulations, 
etc. 



Board of 
health may 
prohibit the 
entrance of 
waste, etc., 
into a sewer 
system. 



[Chapter 433.] 

An Act to provide for the proper maintenance and en- 
largement OF WORKS FOR THE TREATMENT OR PURIFICA- 
TION OF SEWAGE. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Cities, towns, persons, firms or corporations, 
owning or operating filter beds or other works for the treat- 
ment or purification of sewage shall provide and maintain 
works adequate for the treatment of the sewage at all times, 
and shall operate such works in such manner as will prevent 
a nuisance therefrom or the discharge or escape of unpurified 
or imperfectly purified sewage or effluent into any stream, pond 
or other water, or other objectionable result. 

Section 2. The board of sewer commissioners or other 
board or officer having charge of the sewers in cities and towns 
shall have authority to make such regulations regarding the 
use of the sewers as are necessary to prevent the entrance or 
discharge therein of any substance which may tend to interfere 
with the flow of sewage or the proper operation of the sewerage 
system or disposal works. 

Section 3. The state board of health, if convinced, upon 
examination, that a filter bed or other works for the treatment 
or purification of sewage causes the pollution of a stream, 
pond or other water, or is likely to become a source of nuisance 
or create objectionable results in its neighborhood by reason 
of defective construction, inadequate capacity or negligence or 
inefficiency in maintenance or operation or from other cause, 
may issue notice in writing to the city, town or person owning 
or operating such works requiring such enlargement or im- 
provement in the works or change in the method of operation 
thereof as may be necessary for the proper maintenance and op- 
eration of the works and the efficient purification and disposal 
of the sewage. In case the state board of health is satisfied 
after investigation that the unsatisfactory operation of a sew- 
age disposal system is due wholly or partly to the discharge 
into the system of manufacturing waste or other substance of 
such character as to interfere with the efficient operation of 
said works, said board may if necessary prohibit the entrance 
of such waste or other material or may regulate the entrance 
thereof into the system, or may require the treatment of such 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 267 

waste or other material in such manner as may be necessary 
to prevent its interference with the operation of the works. 

Section 4. The supreme judicial court, or the superior Enforcement 
court, shall have jurisdiction in equity to enforce the provi- pi 
sions of this act upon petition of the state board of health or 
of any party interested. 

Section 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 21, 1909. 



[Chapter 473.] 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage BOARD TO SELL OR LEASE CERTAIN LAND EOR THE 
TRANSMISSION OF ELECTRIC POWER. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Section eleven of chapter four hundred and i895, 488, § 11, 
eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five is hereby amended by inserting after the word 
" needed ", in the fourteenth line, the words : — and may, in 
their discretion, by lease, license or other agreement, permit 
the construction and maintenance on any land under their con- 
trol of towers, poles, wires and other structures for the purpose 
of transmitting electric power over lands and waters of the com- 
monwealth held for water supply purposes : provided, that, in 
the opinion of the board, such lease, license or agreement will 
not affect or interfere with the metropolitan water supply; 
and provided, further, that no lease, license or agreement shall 
be given or made for a period of more than fifteen years, — 
so as to read as follows: — Section 11. Said board and any (storing or 

J pumping of 

city, town or water company aforesaid, may asrree with each water, pur- 

J ? r j y j o chase of prop- 

other for the storing or pumping of water, or the furnishing erty, etc.) 
of the same as aforesaid by either party to any city, town or 
company; and any such city, town or company may sell to 
said board, and said board may purchase any property of such 
city, town or company, whether taken by eminent domain or 
otherwise, that said board may deem desirable for use in fur- 
nishing, as aforesaid, water to any city, town or water com- 
pany; and said board may sell at public or private sale any 
property, real or personal, whether taken by eminent domain 
or otherwise, no longer needed for the water works under their 
charge, or may from time to time lease any property not then 
so needed; and may, in their discretion, by lease, license or 



268 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

other agreement, permit the construction and maintenance on 
any land under their control of towers, poles, wires and other 
structures for the purpose of transmitting electric power over 
lands and waters of the commonwealth held for water supply 
Provisos. purposes: provided, that, in the opinion of the board, such 

lease, license or agreement will not affect or interfere with the 
metropolitan water supply; and provided, further, that no 
lease, license or agreement shall be given or made for a period 
of more than fifteen years. The proceeds from the operations 
of said board shall be paid into the treasury of the common- 
wealth. 

Section" 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June J/-, 1909. 



[Chapter 479.] 

An Act to authorize the town of framingham to pro- 
cure AND USE ELECTRICITY FOR CERTAIN MUNICIPAL PUR- 
POSES. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
Jgham may m " Section 1. The town of Framingham is hereby authorized 
turel fartrans- ^° erec ^ maintain and use poles, wires and other fixtures, ap- 
Sectricity pliances and apparatus in, under, over and upon any lands, 
public ways or lanes therein for the transmission of electricity 
generated by it or purchased from any person, firm or corpora- 
tion now or hereafter authorized by law to distribute and sell 
electricity in said town, the same to be used in its water works 
and sewage disposal pumping stations, and for the purification 
of its sewage and water supply, but for no other purpose: 
Lands of com- provided, however, that no such poles, wires, fixtures, appli- 

monwealth ex- . ' , ,, , . -. . . . , . -. 

cepted. ances or apparatus shall be erected or maintained m, under, 

over or upon any lands belonging to the commonwealth or 
subject to the jurisdiction of the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage board. The authority to generate electricity for the 
purposes of this act shall only be exercised after the affirma- 
tive vote of two thirds of the voters present and voting thereon 
at each of two town meetings called for the purpose and held 
at intervals of not less than two nor more than four months. 
Nothing herein contained shall authorize said town to acquire 
a plant for the manufacture or distribution of electricity for 
other municipal uses or for the use of its inhabitants, save 
upon the proceeding required by and subject to the provisions 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 269 

of chapter thirty-four of the Revised Laws and all amend- 
ments thereof now or hereafter enacted. The said town, for 
the purpose aforesaid, may take, or acquire by purchase or 
otherwise, and hold such lands, easements and rights of way 
as may be needed therefor. Such taking shall be in the man- 
ner provided by chapter two hundred and six of the acts of 
the year eighteen hundred and ninety-three, and the town shall 
be liable for all damages to property sustained by any person 
or corporation by reason of any taking or other act made or 
done under authority hereof. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 9, 1909. 



RESOLVES. 

[Chapter 56.] 

Resolve in favor of michael nagle. 
Resolved, That there be allowed and paid out of the North Michael Nagie. 
Metropolitan System Maintenance Fund, to Michael Nagle of 
Boston, the sum of forty-five dollars, in full compensation for 
loss of clothing, money and personal effects, sustained by him 
while endeavoring to protect the property of the common- 
wealth at the time of the Chelsea fire, April twelfth, nineteen 
hundred and eight. [Approved April 26, 1909. 



Crowley. 



[Chapter 57.] 

Resolve in favor of Patrick crowley. 

Resolved, That there be allowed and paid out of the North £j^*j* v 
Metropolitan System Maintenance Fund, to Patrick Crowley 
of Boston, the sum of one hundred three dollars and fifty cents, 
in full compensation for loss of clothing, money and articles 
of personal adornment, sustained by him while endeavoring to 
protect the property of the commonwealth at the time of the 
Chelsea fire, April twelfth, nineteen hundred and eight. [Ap- 
proved April 26, 1909. 



Index to Legislation of the Year 1909 



AFFECTING THE 



Metropolitan water and sewerage board. 



A. 

APPROPRIATIONS. Chap. Sect. 

for construction for certain purposes in Metropolitan Water Works, . . 320 1 

for maintenance of Metropolitan Water System, . . . 90 1 

for maintenance of North Metropolitan Sewerage System, . . . 105 1 

for maintenance of South Metropolitan Sewerage System, . . . 104 1 

c. 

CROWLEY, PATRICK. Res. 

may have compensation for loss by fire at East Boston station, . . 57 

D. 

DUG POND. Chap, 

to exclude from Metropolitan Water System, 282 1 

E. 

ELECTRIC POWER. 

Board may permit structures on land of Commonwealth for transmission of, 473 1 

F. 

PRAMINGHAM. 

town of, may erect structures for transmission of electricity except on land 

of Commonwealth, . . . 479 1 

H. 

HINGHAM. 

town of, exempt from certain provisions of law relative to Metropolitan 

Water System, 74 1 

HULL. 

town of, exempt from certain provisions of law relative to Metropolitan 

Water System, 74 1 

L. 

LOAN. 

for Metropolitan Water Works, 320 2 

M. 
METERS. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board to supervise and enforce pro- 
visions of act relative to, . 177 1-2 



272 INDEX. 



Chap. Sect. 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

may permit structures on land for transmission of electric power, . . 473 1 
may supply water to sections of cities and towns not in Metropolitan 

Water District, . . . . ' . . 258 1 

to make certain improvements in Metropolitan Water System, . . 320 1 

to supervise and enforce provisions of meter act, 177 1-2 

METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, 90 1 

to exclude Dug Pond from, . . 282 1 

to exempt town of Hingham from certain provisions of law relative to, . 74 1 

to exempt town of Hull from certain provisions of law relative to, . 74 1 

N. 
NAGLE, MICHAEL. Res. 

may have compensation for loss by fire at East Boston station, . 56 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. Chap. 

appropriation for maintenance of, 105 1 

S. 

SEWAGE. 

to provide for proper maintenance and enlargement of works for treat- 
ment of, 433 1-4 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, . . . . . . . 104 1 

T. 

TAXES. 

relative to payments in lieu of, on property held for water supply purposes, 243 1 








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